Foundation for Advancement in Cancer Therapy

Non-Traditional Approaches to
the Theories, Treatments and Prevention of Cancer

Spice of the Month

October 23, 2012

Filed under: Spice of the Month — ggrieser @ 8:56 pm

spiceHumans have been sprinkling spices on their foods as far back as 50,000 B.C. But, beyond adding flavor, these dried seeds, fruits, root or bark can also add years to your life.

Spices are rich in phytonutrients and other active ingredients that protect against disease and promote healing. In worldwide studies, spices have been linked to the prevention and treatment of chronic conditions such as heart disease, cancer, Type II diabetes, and Alzheimer’s. And, unlike pharmaceutical drugs, spices can be used long- term without concern for side effects.

In short, spices are among the great gifts Nature has bestowed upon us.

We hope you’ll enjoy learning about them and partake of their life enhancing qualities.

Spices of the Month:

Artichoke

September 18, 2017

The artichoke is believed to be native to the area around the western and central Mediterranean. The Romans were growing artichokes over 2000 years ago, and used it as a green and a salad plant.

Artichokes were brought to England in 1548, and French settlers planted them in Louisiana in the mid-nineteenth century. California is now the center of the artichoke crop, and its peak season is March, April, and May.

The name “artichoke” is derived from the northern Italian words “articiocco” and “articoclos,” which refer to what we know to be a pine cone. The artichoke bud does resemble a pine cone.

There is a variety of vegetable called the Jerusalem artichoke, but it is not a true artichoke. It is a tuberous member of the sunflower family. Here, we refer to the two types of true artichokes, the Cardoon (cone-shaped) and the Globe. The most popular variety is the Green Globe.

The artichoke is a large, vigorous plant. It has long, coarse, spiny leaves that can grow to three feet long. The artichoke plants may grow as high as six feet tall.

A perennial, the artichoke grows best in cool, but not freezing, weather. It likes plenty of water, and rain and fog, so is best suited to the California coast, especially the San Francisco area.

For a good quality artichoke, select one that is compact, plump, and heavy, yields slightly to pressure, and has large, tightly clinging, fleshy leaf scales that are a good color. An artichoke that is brown is old or has been injured. An artichoke is over mature when it is open or spreading, the center is fuzzy or dark pink or purple, and the tips and scales are hard. March, April, and May are the months when the artichoke is abundant.

The parts of the artichoke that are eaten are the fleshy part of the leaves and heart, and the tender base. Medium-sized artichokes are best—large ones tend to be tough and tasteless. They may be served either hot or cold, and make a delicious salad.

To prepare artichokes, cut off the stem and any tough or damaged leaves. Wash the artichoke in cold running water, then place in boiling water, and cook twenty to thirty minutes, or until tender. To make the artichoke easier to eat, remove the choke in the center, pull out the top center leaves, and, with a spoon, remove the thistle-like inside.

To eat artichokes, pull off the petal leaves as you would the petals of a daisy, and bite off the end.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Artichoke hearts and leaves have a high alkaline ash. They also have a great deal of roughage, which is not good for those who have inflammation of the bowel. They are good to eat on a reducing diet.

Artichokes contain vitamins A and C, which are good for fighting off infection. They are high in calcium and iron.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (including inedible parts)

Calories: 60

Protein: 5.3 g

Fat: 0.4 g

Carbohydrates: 19.2 g

Calcium: 93 mg

Phosphorus: 160 mg

Iron: 2.4 mg

Vitamin A: 290 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.14 mg

Riboflavin: 0.09 mg

Niacin: 1.7 mg

Ascorbic acid: 22 mg

Endive and Escarole

September 11, 2017

Native to the East Indies, endive and escarole were introduced into Egypt and Greece at a very early period and references to them appear in history. The plants were brought to America by colonists. Endive is closely related botanically to chicory and the two names are sometimes incorrectly used as synonyms. Escarole is another name for a type of endive with broad leaves and a well-blanched heart. The word “endive” is used to designate plants with narrow, finely divided, curly leaves. These greens are used raw in salad, or may be cooked like spinach. The slightly bitter flavor adds zest to a mixed salad.

Crispness, freshness, and tenderness are essential factors of quality. Wilted plants, especially those that have brown leaves, are undesirable, as are plants with tough, coarse leaves. Such leaves will be excessively bitter. Tenderness can be determined by breaking or twisting a leaf. In the unblanched condition leaves should be green, but when blanched, center leaves should be creamy white or yellowish white.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Escarole and endive are very high in vitamin A, and work very well in ridding the body of infections. They are both high in iron and potassium and are alkaline in reaction. Escarole and endive are both useful as an appetite stimulant because of their bitter ingredients. Escarole also helps to activate the bile. They are best when used raw.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (both escarole and endive)

Calories: 80

Protein: 6.8g

Fat: .4g

Carbohydrates: 16.4g

Calcium: 323mg

Phosphorus: 216mg

Iron: 6.8mg

Vitamin A: 13,170 I.U.

Thiamine: .27mg

Riboflavin: .56mg

Niacin: 2mg

Ascorbic Acid: 42mg

Rethinking Cancer Newsletter #63

September 7, 2017

Filed under: Rethinking Cancer Newsletters — ggrieser @ 5:30 pm

Occasionally, we get a question on our info@rethinkingcancer.org that makes us wonder if we’re getting our message across as effectively as we’d like. Here’s a recent example:

“I take two 500 mg of clove caps. Is this too much? I read it was the top antioxidant food.”

Clove may contain many beneficial elements, including antioxidants, but taking this amount routinely, particularly as a supplement, can be too harsh on the system. Supplements should be used sparingly and only for as long as needed to resolve a difficiency or other issue. Real food is what the body is designed for. Moreover, doubling down on one food, like clove, because of its antioxidant content is flawed thinking. Antioxidants are found to some degree in a multitude of fresh, whole foods, but to focus on one edible item because of one attribute is to miss the panoply of vital elements — many of which may not yet even be known by science— in other so-called “lesser” foods. There is no “magic bullet” food to insure health or protect us from all disease. Nature has provided us with a food supply of stunning diversity, each creation containing its unique tapestry (essential synergism) of phytochemicals, antioxidants, minerals, vitamins, etc., for sustaining life. Don’t miss out on any of the goodness. Mix it up! Listen to your body! One day you may find yourself drawn to a cauliflower, the next day it’s something else. Some days you’re very hungry, others not. The body is a dynamic instrument and does not do well on “automatic

”Cloves are nice, but variety is truly the “top” spice of life.

To your health!

Foundation for Advancement in Cancer Therapy (F.A.C.T.)

P.S. Take a look at our Donate page, now with links to a “variety” of classic books essential for your health library.  And don’t forget, you can stream our film on iTunes and on Amazon. Do keep in touch on TwitterFacebook and our YouTube channel!

A New Breed of Doctor

By Alan H. Nittler, M.D.

The great need of the average citizen of planet Earth is to know how to live a healthy, productive life, free of disease. In 1972, Dr. Alan Nittler wrote a book called A New Breed of Doctor in which he lamented the fact that very few doctors focus on teaching this sort of thing in their practice. He hoped that a new breed would emerge who considered it infinitely more important to keep you well than to try to help you when you’re sick. Today, 45 years later, there are more doctors who understand this (many of whom can be found on our (Practitioner Directory), but there is still a great need for more. Here are some of his thoughts:

The doctor of the future will influence the political process and the food and drug laws. He will see that restaurants do not serve food that brings on degeneration. He will have a voice in food processing, manufacturing and packaging. In the future, we will have hospitals that will not allow patients to check out before they know how to change their habits and prevent future recurrences of their condition. We will learn how to cook right. Read More

A Travel Tip: Grapefruit Seed Extract

As the Northern Hemisphere moves into summer, many of us will be heading for exotic locales. But nothing can ruin a vacation faster than picking up some exotic bacteria or other assorted critters from the local water or food, leading to a case of  “Montezuma’s Revenge” (a.k.a. Traveler’s Diarrhea) — a quick way to turn a dream trip into a nightmare.

So here’s a little known secret: grapefruit seed extract (GSE). Read More

On the Rebound

The simple act of bouncing on a rebounder (mini-trampoline) is a uniquely powerful form of exercise. While most types of workouts target specific muscles or just increase cardiovascular function, rebounding uses the forces of acceleration and deceleration to activate literally every cell in the body without stressing any particular part.

The idea of rebounding has been around for quite a while. However, it really picked up steam in the 1980’s when NASA was looking for the most effective way to counteract the harmful effects of weightlessness on the body, namely, that after as little as 14 days in space, astronauts can lose up to 15% of bone and muscle mass. After conducting studies comparing the benefits of various forms of exercise, they found rebounding to be the superior choice. Read More

Iced Turmeric Lemonade

After bouncing on your rebounder, you might be up for something refreshing to drink. Iced turmeric lemonade combines the flavor of earthy turmeric with fresh lemon and natural sweetness for a surprisingly delicious, salubrious drink. A spice superstar, turmeric has long been known for its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties which benefit virtually every organ of the body. Current studies focus on it’s potential to lower the incidence and severity of chronic diseases, such as cancer, heart disease, Alzheimer’s, and to improve blood sugar balance, support kidney function, lessen the severity of arthritis and some digestive disorders.

  • 1 cup pure water (preferably distilled)
  • 3/4 cup of ice
  • 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice (or more to taste)
  • ½ -1 tsp. teaspoon turmeric powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon stevia drops (or more to taste), or about a teaspoon of other natural
  • sweetener like raw honey, maple syrup, etc.
  • tiny pinch of black pepper (increases the benefits of turmeric)
  1. Combine all ingredients in a high speed blender and blend until ice is completely blended in.
  2. Let rest about 30 seconds before pouring. Serve over more ice, if you like.
  3. Drink immediately for peak flavor and potency.

You can also substitute limes for lemons; for oranges, double the juice and reduce the water by 1/4 cup.

Thanks to Wellness Mama for this recipe!

Blackberry

September 5, 2017

Blackberries are native to both North America and Europe, but cultivation of this fruit is largely limited to North America. In the early days of the United States, when land was cleared for pasture, blackberry bushes began to multiply. There are many hybrids of blackberries, and both man and nature have had a hand in this process. By 1850, cultivated blackberries had become very popular. Blackberries are now cultivated in almost every part of the United States. Texas and Oregon probably have the largest numbers of acres planted with blackberries. Cultivation of this berry has been slow, because wild berries grow in abundance all over the country. The summer months are the peak season for blackberries.

A quality berry is solid and plump, appears bright and fresh, and is a full black or blue color. Do not choose berries that are partly green or off-color, because the flavor will not be good.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Blackberries are high in iron, but can cause constipation. They have been used for years to control diarrhea. If blackberry juice is mixed with cherry or prune juice, the constipating effect will be taken away. If one can take blackberry juice without constipating results, it is one of the finest builders of the blood.

Much like spinach, raisins, apples, plums and grapes, blackberries are rich in bio-flavonoids and Vitamin C, but other nutritional benefits include a very low sodium count and having only 62 calories to a cup. The dark blue color ensures blackberries have one of the highest antioxidant levels of all fruits. Antioxidants, well-known for lowering the risk of a number of cancers, are a huge bonus, but be aware the berries are best consumed in their natural state to get the full benefits.

The berries are known by a variety of names, which include brambleberries, bramble, dewberry, thimbleberry and lawers. Consumption of blackberries can help to promote the healthy tightening of tissue, which is a great non-surgical procedure to make skin look younger. Prolonged consumption also helps keeps your brain alert, thereby maintaining clarity of thought and good memory. The high tannin content of blackberries provides a number of benefits to reduce intestinal inflammation, alleviate hemorrhoids and soothe the effects of diarrhea.

Traditionally, the leaves and barks of the plant have also been consumed. The leaves of blackberries have been used to treat mild inflammation of the gums and sometimes even sore throats. The astringent tannins are effective in oral hygiene when used as a gargle or mouthwash. The leaves can also be used in a refreshing cup of tea or enhanced as a therapeutic drink. Not everyone will like the flavor, so to mask the bitter taste, honey or another form of sweetener may be added. The healthy dose of Vitamin K aids in muscle relaxing, so some women use the berries to alleviate labor pains. As part of a regular diet, the juice can also be used to regulate menstruation as it is very effective in helping blood to clot.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 294

Protein: 5.4 g

Fat: 3.6 g

Carbohydrates: 59.9 g

Calcium: 163 mg

Phosphorus: 154 mg

Iron: 4.1 mg

Vitamin A: 1,460 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.12 mg

Riboflavin: 0.03 mg

Niacin: 1.3 mg

Ascorbic acid: 106 mg

Broccoli

August 28, 2017

Broccoli was grown in France and Italy in the sixteenth century, but was not well known in this country until 1923, when the D’Arrigo Brothers Company made a trial planting of Italian sprouting broccoli in California. A few crates of this were sent to Boston, and by 1925 the market was well established. Since then, the demand for broccoli has been steadily on the increase.

Broccoli is a member of the cabbage family. California, Arizona, and Texas are the main broccoli-producing states.

When choosing broccoli, look for tenderness in the stalk, espcially the upper portion. If the lower portion of the stalk is tough and woody, and if the bud dusters are open and yellow, the broccoli is over mature and will be tough. Fresh broccoli does not keep, so purchase only as much as you can immediately use.

Broccoli is often gas-forming, but if cooked in a steamer or over a very low fire, this may be avoided. Broccoli is best if under-cooked, because the more green that is left in broccoli, the more chlorophyll will be left to counteract the sulfur compounds that form gas.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

All of the foods in the cabbage family, including broccoli, are best if eaten with proteins, because the combination helps drive amino acids to the brain. Broccoli is high in vitamins A and C, and is low in calories. It is beneficial to the elimination system.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 103

Protein: 9.1 g

Fat: 0.6 g

Carbohydrates: 15.2 g

Calcium: 360 mg

Phosphorus: 211 mg

Iron: 5.6 mg

Vitamin A: 9,700 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.26 mg

Riboflavin: 0.59 mg

Niacin: 2.5 mg

Ascorbic acid: 327 mg

Cherry

August 21, 2017

Garden cherries originated chiefly from two species, the sour cherry and the sweet cherry. Both are native to Eastern Europe and Western Asia, where they have been cultivated since ancient times. Cherry pits have been found in prehistoric cave dwellings.

Cherries are grown in every state. Leading cherry producers are New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, Montana, Idaho, Colorado, Utah, Washington, Oregon, and California. Washington, Oregon, and California leading sweet cherry production, while Michigan leads in production of sour cherries.

The Tartarian variety, which is mahogany to black in color, and medium to large in size, is a popular early to mid-season variety of sweet cherry. The cherry in heaviest demand for the fresh market is the Bing: an extra large, heart-shaped, deep maroon to black fruit. It is firm, high-flavored, and stands up well. Bing cherries are on the market through the months of June and July. The Black Republican and Lambert are similar in appearance to the Bing. The Royal Ann is the leading light-colored cherry, and is used primarily for canning. It is large, is light amber to yellow with red blush, and has a delightful flavor. The Schmidt is a dark red to black sweet cherry grown widely. The Windsor is another popular sweet cherry, and its color is dark red to almost black.

The leading sour varieties of the cherry are the Early Richmond of the East and Middle West, The Montmorenci and the English Morello.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

The cherry is high in Iron, and is an excellent laxative as well as a wonderful blood builder. The black cherry is best for eating.

Cherries mix well with other fruits and with proteins, but never with starches. They are wonderful in an elimination diet. The cherry should not often be mixed with dairy foods. This fruit, which has high alkaline content, also gets rid of toxic waste, and it has a wonderful effect on the glandular system.

Black cherry juice is wonderful for flavoring teas so that sugar can be avoided. It is a wonderful gall bladder and liver cleanse because of its high iron content. Take a six-ounce glass of black cherry juice each morning before breakfast for the gall bladder and liver.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 286

Protein: 5.3 g

Fat: 1.2 g

Carbohydrates: 71 g

Calcium: 90 mg

Phosphorus: 78 mg

Iron: 1.6 mg

Vitamin A: 450 I.U.

Thiamine: .20 mg

Riboflavin: .24 mg

Niacin: 1.7 mg

Ascorbic acid: 41 mg

Blueberry

August 14, 2017

Blueberries originally grew wild in North America, and in many places they still do. By 1910 there were at least two varieties being cultivated for market. Breeding and selection have made these berries popular, but wild fruit is also marketed.

Blueberries are available from early May through August, and the peak month is July. Canada and the northeastern United States produce the greatest amount of blueberries, because they grow best when the days are long and the nights cool. In any one area the blueberry season usually lasts from six to seven weeks.

Quality blueberries are plump, look fresh, clean, and dry, are fairly uniform in size, and are a deep blue, black, or purplish color. Overripe berries are dull in appearance, soft and watery, and moldy.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Blueberries contain silicon, which helps rejuvenate the pancreas. They are said to be good for diabetic conditions.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 310

Protein: 2.9g

Fat: 2.1g

Carbohydrates: 63.8g

Calcium: 63mg

Phosphorus: 54mg

Iron: 3.6mg

Vitamin A: 420 I.U.

Thiamine: —

Riboflavin: —

Niacin: —

Ascorbic Acid: 58mg

Pomegranate

August 7, 2017

Mohammad once told his followers: “Eat the pomegranate, for it purges the system of envy and hatred.” The pomegranate is one of the oldest fruits known to man. Frequent references to it are found in the Bible and in ancient Sanskrit writings. Homer mentions it in his Odyssey, and it appears in the story of The Arabian Nights. The pomegranate is native to Persia and its neighboring countries, and for centuries has been extensively cultivated around the Mediterranean, spreading through Asia. King Solomon was known to have an orchard of pomegranates, and history speaks of the children of Israel wandering in the wilderness and remembering with longing the cooling taste of the pomegranate. Ancient Assyrian and Egyptian sculpture has depicted this fruit, and it is sometimes on ancient Carthaginian and Phoenician medals.

The word pomegranate is derived from the Latin world meaning “apple with many seeds.” The fruit grows on a bush or small tree from twelve to twenty feet high. It grows to about the size of an orange or larger.

A pomegranate of good quality may be medium or large in size and the coloring can range from pink to bright red. The rind is thin and tough, and there should be an abundance of bright red or crimson flesh, with a small amount of pulp. The seeds are contained in a reddish, juicy pulp that is subacid and of fine flavor. They should be tender, easy to eat, and small in proportion to the juicy matter that surrounds them, while the juice should be abundant and rich in flavor.

There are many varieties of pomegranate. At least ten varieties were growing in southern Spain in the thirteenth century, as described by a writer of the time. It is a warm-climate fruit, and the leading producers in this country are California and the Gulf states. This fruit will not mature in cooler climates, although there are dwarf forms grown in cool climates which have striking scarlet flowers that are sold commercially. Pomegranates are in season September through December, and October is the peak month.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Use only the juice of the pomegranate. This juice is one of the best for bladder disorders and has a slightly purgative effect. For elderly people, it is a wonderful kidney and bladder tonic.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (edible portion)

Calories: 160

Protein: 1.3 g

Fat: 0.8 g

Carbohydrates: 41.7 g

Calcium: 20 mg

Phosphorus: .8 mg

Iron: .8 mg

Vitamin A: trace

Thiamine: 0.07 mg

Riboflavin: 0.07 mg

Niacin: 0.7 mg

Ascorbic acid: 10 mg

Onion

July 31, 2017

Onions are believed to have originated in Asia. When the Israelites were in the wilderness after being led out of Egypt by Moses, they yearned for onions and other vegetables they were used to eating. Onions were used by the Egyptians as offerings to their gods. They were fed to the workmen who built the pyramids, and Alexander the Great gave onions to his troops to promote their valor.

The odiferous onion and the dainty lily are members of the same family, Liliaceae. The substance that gives the onion its distinctive odor and flavor is a volatile sulfurous oil which is about half eliminated by boiling. This volatile oil is what causes tears. Holding onions under cold water while peeling them prevents the oil fumes from rising, so use water and spare your handkerchief.

Onions lose approximately 27% of their original ascorbic acid (vitamin C) after five minutes of boiling.

There are two classes of onions—strong and mild. The early grown onions are generally milder in flavor and odor and are preferred for raw use. Each of these two classes can be again categorized into four colors—red, brown, white and yellow. The white onions are the mildest. Each has many varieties.

Onions are also further divided by size for different uses. The smallest size is the pickling onion, also knows as pearl or button onion, and is not more than one inch thick. The next size is the boiling onion, which is usually an inch to two inches in diameter. The next larger size is preferred for chopping or grating. The very large Spanish or Bermuda onions are mild and sweet and good for slicing. They average two and one-half to two and three-quarters inches in diameter. In the trade, the term Valencia is used to mean Spanish-type yellow onions. The globe and flat-type yellow onions are generally referred to as yellows, and white onions of the globe and semi-globe types are generally referred to as whites.

Texas is the main early spring producer; California and Texas the main late spring states; California and New Jersey the most important early summer producers; and New York, Michigan, Minnesota, Colorado, California, Idaho, and Oregon the principal late summer states.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Onions are one of the earliest known food medicines, and were used for hundreds of years for colds and catarrhal disorders and to drive fermentations and impurities out of the system. The liquid from a raw onion that has been chopped up fine, covered with honey, and left standing for four or five hours, makes an excellent cough syrup. It is wonderful for soothing an inflamed throat. Onion packs on the chest have been used for years in bronchial inflammations.

Onions contain a large amount of sulfur and are especially good for the liver. As a sulfur food, they mix best with proteins, as they stimulate the action of the amino acids to the brain and nervous system. Whenever onions are eaten, it is a good idea to use greens with them. Parsley especially helps neutralize the effects of the onion sulfur in the intestinal tract.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 157

Protein: 6 g

Fat: 0.4 g

Carbohydrates: 36 g

Calcium: 111 mg

Phosphorus: 149 mg

Iron: 2.1 mg

Vitamin A: 160 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.15 mg

Riboflavin: 0.10 mg

Niacin: 0.6 mg

Ascorbic acid: 38 mg

Lettuce

July 24, 2017

Lettuce is one of the oldest vegetables and probably originated in India or Central Asia. According to the writings or Herodotus, lettuce was served to the Persian kings as far back as the sixth century BC. It was a popular Roman food at about the beginning of the Christian era, and in the first century AD a dozen distinctively different varieties were described by Roman writers of the era. There is also evidence that lettuce was grown in China in the fifth century AD.

Columbus may have carried lettuce seeds to the New World, for it was being cultivated in the Bahamas in 1494. It was a common vegetable in Haiti as early as 1565, and Brazil was reported to have cultivated before 1650. The early colonists evidently introduced lettuce into the US, and in 1806 16 varieties were reported growing in American gardens.

Both the English and Latin words for lettuce are based on the heavy, milky juice of the vegetable, which is characteristic of the lettuce family. The primitive forms of lettuce has long stems and large leafs grew at the end of these stems. These closed-packed lettuce heads were well developed in Europe by the 16th century, while the loose common head type of developed later.

Lettuce has become the most valuable truck crop, and 85% of the commercial crop is produced in the west-California, Arizona, Colorado, Washington, Oregon, and Idaho. The northeast and south Atlantic states are also important lettuce growing regions.

Lettuce is available all year, and the peak months are May, June, and July. Although the crisp head and butter head types are the most important from a commercial standpoint, the Cos or Romaine type are bets from a health standpoint, as the sun is allowed to penetrate each leaf. The leaves generally have less of the bitterness that is characteristic of some types of head lettuce. The “leaf” or the “bunching” type of lettuce is distinguished by loose leaves that do not form a head. This type is best for home gardening, as it can be grown in areas where the temperature is too high for successful growing of the other types of lettuce. The stem type lettuce has an enlarged stem and no head. The leaves are not as palpable as the other types of lettuce leaves except when young and tender. The stems are pulled and eaten raw or cooked.

Lettuce of good quality should be fresh, crisp, and tender, and if in head lettuce form, the head should be fairly firm to hard. Lettuce with a well developed seed stem has a bitter flavor.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Leaf lettuce is much richer in iron than head lettuce. We do not advocate using head lettuce in the diet, for it contains little nourishment. It contains significantly lower amounts of vitamins A and C than green Romaine lettuce. The darker green outside leaves contain a much higher proportion of the valuable food  elements than the light colored inner leaves. Head lettuce is very gas forming , and really only offers bulk to the intestinal tract. It has an alkaline ash, however, and is not stimulating. Also, it is excellent for those who would like to lose weight. It also has many sleep promoting elements and makes good lettuce juice, which help promote sleep. It tends to slow down the digestive effect of the intestinal tract.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (head lettuce)

Calories: 57

Protein: 3.8 g

Fat: 0.6 g

Carbohydrates: 0.1 g

Calcium: 86 mg

Phosphorus: 78 mg

Iron: 1.6 mg

Vitamin A: 1,710  I.U.

Thiamine: 0.20 mg

Riboflavin: 0.21 mg

Niacin: 0.5 mg

Ascorbic acid: 24 mg

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