Foundation for Advancement in Cancer Therapy

Non-Traditional Approaches to
the Theories, Treatments and Prevention of Cancer

Cherry

July 26, 2011

Filed under: Foods of the Week, What's New? — admin @ 5:56 am

Garden cherries originated chiefly from two species, the sour cherry and the sweet cherry. Both are native to Eastern Europe and Western Asia, where they have been cultivated since ancient times. Cherry pits have been found in prehistoric cave dwellings.

Cherries are grown in every state. Leading cherry producers are New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, Montana, Idaho, Colorado, Utah, Washington, Oregon, and California. Washington, Oregon, and California leading sweet cherry production, while Michigan leads in production of sour cherries.

The Tartarian variety, which is mahogany to black in color, and medium to large in size, is a popular early to mid-season variety of sweet cherry. The cherry in heaviest demand for the fresh market is the Bing: an extra large, heart-shaped, deep maroon to black fruit. It is firm, high-flavored, and stands up well. Bing cherries are on the market through the months of June and July. The Black Republican and Lambert are similar in appearance to the Bing. The Royal Ann is the leading light-colored cherry, and is used primarily for canning. It is large, is light amber to yellow with red blush, and has a delightful flavor. The Schmidt is a dark red to black sweet cherry grown widely. The Windsor is another popular sweet cherry, and its color is dark red to almost black.

The leading sour varieties of the cherry are the Early Richmond of the East and Middle West, The Montmorenci and the English Morello.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

The cherry is high in Iron, and is an excellent laxative as well as a wonderful blood builder. The black cherry is best for eating.

Cherries mix well with other fruits and with proteins, but never with starches. They are wonderful in an elimination diet. The cherry should not often be mixed with dairy foods. This fruit, which has high alkaline content, also gets rid of toxic waste, and it has a wonderful effect on the glandular system.

Black cherry juice is wonderful for flavoring teas so that sugar can be avoided. It is a wonderful gall bladder and liver cleanse because of its high iron content. Take a six-ounce glass of black cherry juice each morning before breakfast for the gall bladder and liver.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 286

Protein: 5.3 g

Fat: 1.2 g

Carbohydrates: 71 g

Calcium: 90 mg

Phosphorus: 78 mg

Iron: 1.6 mg

Vitamin A: 450 I.U.

Thiamine: .20 mg

Riboflavin: .24 mg

Niacin: 1.7 mg

Ascorbic acid: 41 mg

Guava

July 18, 2011

Filed under: Foods of the Week, What's New? — admin @ 4:55 am

The guava is called the apple of the tropics. It is native to tropical America, but has been dispersed throughout all equatorial regions. It is grown in subtropical Florida and California, and the tree is a hearty one.

The guava tree produces large quantities of fruit. The fruit is round, with a white or yellow skin and a pulp of the same color, although the pulp is sometimes crimson. It ranges from the size of a small cherry to that of a pear or apple.

THERAPUETIC VALUE

The guava is subacid and alkaline in reaction. It is a high vitamin C content, and also contains potassium, phosphorus, sulfur, and chlorine. It is good for skeletal and lymphatic systems.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 273

Protein: 3.5 g

Fat: 2.6 g

Carbohydrates: 66 g

Calcium: 101 mg

Phosphorus: 185 mg

Iron: 4.0 mg

Vitamin A: 1230 I.U.

Thiamine: .23 mg

Riboflavin: .21 mg

Niacin: 5.1 mg

Ascorbic acid: 1,065 mg

Rethinking Cancer Newsletter 20

July 11, 2011

Filed under: Rethinking Cancer Newsletters — ggrieser @ 2:27 pm

When F.A.C.T. was established in 1971, the idea that stress had anything to do with the disease process was regarded by the conventional medical community as pretty much a wacko New Age notion. Today, thanks to the work of pioneers like Hans Selye, Ph.D., Bernie Siegel, M.D., Herbert Bensen, M.D. and others, who have demonstrated measurable scientific benefits with patients, in orthodox circles there is now a certain grudging appreciation, if not total embrace, of the mind/body connection. Even some insurance companies are realizing the money saving potential in supporting treatments like visualization, meditation, biofeedback, yoga, cognitive therapy, etc.

Chronic stress plays havoc with body function! In our film, Rethinking Cancer, as well as all the material on this website about the metabolic/Biorepair program, a key component in regaining and maintaining health is a take charge attitude and a relaxed frame of mind. In our experience, the psychological aspect to healing cannot be ignored!

There are many stress management strategies afoot today. We’d like to dedicate this edition of the newsletter to just a few ways you might enhance your mental well-being and, while you’re at it, do your body a huge favor.

Check out the new video on our Video Presentation page: Ruth Sackman on “Making Sense of Alternative Cancer Therapies.” This is vital information for anyone trying to navigate the mishmash of alternative, as well as conventional therapies.

To Your Health!
Foundation for Advancement in Cancer Therapy (F.A.C.T.)

As always, thanks so much for your support and don’t forget to sign up with us at Facebook and Twitter to get weekly updates!

Are You Over-Tense?

We live in an increasingly fast-paced world or, more aptly, whirl! Chronic stress and tension have become problems for many of us and can lead to serious physical ailments. While, in some cases, professional help may be called for, there’s a lot we can do to help ourselves. Here are some self-help measures recommended by the National Association for Mental Health: Read More

Meditation Made Easy
By Sally Kempton

“For 20 years, I’ve meditated before stressful meetings, when I’m slammed by deadlines and during all kinds of domestic crises,” reports one successful lawyer. “In the middle of a tough day or any time I feel like I’m about to lose it, I’ve learned that if I close my eyes for two minutes, and find that inner place of calm, it will give me the strength to deal with just about anything.”
A string of clinical studies since the 1970’s supports meditators’ claims that the activity works to counteract the negative effects of both acute and chronic stress. Research from Herbert Benson’s Mind-Body Institute and other studies shows that meditation can turn a natural stress response into a natural relaxation response. Instead of the body becoming flooded with chemicals that prepare us to fight or take flight or freeze, meditation releases a flood of calming neurotransmitters and hormones that soothe the system and stimulate immune functions. Meditating helps to bring the body back into balance. Read More

Laugh More!

Gelotology (from the Greek gelos meaning laugh, laughing) is the study of the psychological and physiological effects of laughter on the body — proponents of which recommend a daily dose of laughter for its therapeutic value based on scientific grounds:

  • Laughter relaxes the whole body. A good, hearty laugh relieves physical tension and stress, leaving your muscles relaxed for up to 45 minutes after.
  • Laughter boosts the immune system. Laughter decreases stress hormones and increases immune cells and infection-fighting antibodies, thus improving your resistance to disease.
  • Laughter triggers the release of endorphins, the body’s natural feel-good chemicals. Endorphins promote an overall sense of well-being and can even temporarily relieve pain.
  • Laughter protects the heart and the brain. Because laughing acts on the inner lining of blood vessels, called endothelium, it causes vessels to relax and expand, increasing blood flow. This helps protect you against a heart attack and other cardiovascular problems. It’s also good for your brain, another organ that requires the steady flow of oxygen via the blood vessels.

Most gelotologists suggest at least 15 minutes of laughter a day (along with good diet, regular exercise, etc.). If this exceeds your current laugh proficiency, here are some simple steps to get you up to speed: Read More

A Few De-Stressing Drinks

Watermelon Cooler

If you’re having a busy day and feeling hot and bothered, try this soothing drink. All the ingredients have cooling properties and are very hydrating.

  • 2 cups watermelon, chopped and seeded
  • 1 small cucumber, unpeeled if organic and cut in chunks
  • a few drops rosewater to taste (optional)

Process the watermelon and cucumber in a juicer. Add rosewater to taste, if desired and stir. Makes 1 serving.

Strawberry Soother

Valerian is a sedative herb that calms the nerves and induces sleep. Because it is a medicinal herb, it should be taken occasionally rather than on a daily basis. Lettuce also has calming properties.

  • 1 valerian tea bag
  • 1/2 cup boiling water
  • 1 cup fresh, or thawed frozen, strawberries
  • 1 1/3 cups iceberg lettuce, chopped

Put the tea bag in a cup and add the boiling water. Let steep for 10 minutes, then remove the tea bag and refrigerate the tea until cold, about 20 minutes. Process the strawberries and lettuce in a juice. Pour into the tea and stir. Makes 1 serving.

Chamomile Nightcap

Chamomile tea is a relaxant and helps to reduce anxiety. Like valerian, it is a medicinal tea and is most effective when taken occasionally so the body doesn’t become too accustomed to it. Honey is also known for its soporific qualities, while apple and vanilla add a delicious twist.

  • 1 chamomile tea bag
  • 1/2 cup boiling water
  • 2 apples, unpeeled if organic, cut in chunks
  • 3 drops vanilla extract
  • raw honey, to taste

Put the tea bag in a cup and add boiling water. Let steep for 5 minutes, then remove the tea bag. In a juicer, process the apples. Stir in apple juice, vanilla, honey to taste and sip. Makes 1 serving.

Cheers!

Lettuce

Filed under: Foods of the Week, What's New? — admin @ 6:36 am

Lettuce is one of the oldest vegetables and probably originated in India or Central Asia. According to the writings or Herodotus, lettuce was served to the Persian kings as far back as the sixth century BC. It was a popular Roman food at about the beginning of the Christian era, and in the first century AD a dozen distinctively different varieties were described by Roman writers of the era. There is also evidence that lettuce was grown in China in the fifth century AD.

Columbus may have carried lettuce seeds to the New World, for it was being cultivated in the Bahamas in 1494. It was a common vegetable in Haiti as early as 1565, and Brazil was reported to have cultivated before 1650. The early colonists evidently introduced lettuce into the US, and in 1806 16 varieties were reported growing in American gardens.

Both the English and Latin words for lettuce are based on the heavy, milky juice of the vegetable, which is characteristic of the lettuce family. The primitive forms of lettuce has long stems and large leafs grew at the end of these stems. These closed –packed lettuce heads were well developed in Europe by the 16th century, while the loose common head type of developed later.

Lettuce has become the most valuable truck crop, and 85% of the commercial crop is produced in the west-California, Arizona, Colorado, Washington, Oregon, and Idaho. The northeast and south Atlantic states are also important lettuce growing regions.

Lettuce is available all year, and the peak months are May, June, and July. Although the crisp head and butter head types are the most important from a commercial standpoint, the Cos or Romaine type are bets from a health standpoint, as the sun is allowed to penetrate each leaf. The leaves generally have less of the bitterness that is characteristic of some types of head lettuce. The “leaf” or the “bunching” type of lettuce is distinguished by loose leaves that do not form a head. This type is best for home gardening, as it can be grown in areas where the temperature is too high for successful growing of the other types of lettuce. The stem type lettuce has an enlarged stem and no head. The leaves are not as palpable as the other types of lettuce leaves except when young and tender. The stems are pulled and eaten raw or cooked.

Lettuce of good quality should be fresh, crisp, and tender, and if in head lettuce form, the head should be fairly firm to hard. Lettuce with a well developed seed stem has a bitter flavor.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Leaf lettuce is much richer in iron than head lettuce. We do not advocate using head lettuce in the diet, for it contains little nourishment. It contains significantly lower amounts of vitamins A and C than green Romaine lettuce. The darker green outside leaves contain a much higher proportion of the valuable food elements than the light colored inner leaves. Head lettuce is very gas forming , and really only offers bulk to the intestinal tract. It has an alkaline ash, however, and is not stimulating. Also, it is excellent for those who would like to lose weight. It also has many sleep promoting elements and makes good lettuce juice, which help promote sleep. It tends to slow down the digestive effect of the intestinal tract.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (head lettuce)

Calories: 57

Protein: 3.8 g

Fat: 0.6 g

Carbohydrates: 0.1 g

Calcium: 86 mg

Phosphorus: 78 mg

Iron: 1.6 mg

Vitamin A: 1,710 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.20 mg

Riboflavin: 0.21 mg

Niacin: 0.5 mg

Ascorbic acid: 24 mg

Lemon

July 5, 2011

Filed under: Foods of the Week, What's New? — admin @ 5:40 am

Lemons, one of the most highly alkalinizing foods, are native to tropical Asia, where cultivation goes back at least 2,500 years. In the twelfth century the Arabs brought lemons to Spain and Africa. It was Christopher Columbus, according to Las Casa, the Spanish historian, who brought seeds of lemons with him from the Canary islands on his second voyage.

In the New World, lemons were introduced by the Spanish adventurers in Haiti, then known as Hispaniola. In the US, Florida was the first lemon-producing area, and this state led in production of lemons until the heavy freeze in 1895 killed the lemon groves. They were never replanted. Now, about 95 percent of the lemons used in the US and Canada are produced in southern California. The other 5 percent are grown in Italy. Italy and California together produce all of the world’s entire supply of lemons.

In 1870, a variety of lemon called the Eureka was started from the Sicilian lemon seed planted in Los Angeles by C.R. Workmen. The Eureka, along with Libson, are the two varieties most commonly grown commercially. The Eureka grows in prolific quantity and is early-bearing, from late spring to summer; the Libson tends to bear only one large crop a year, in either spring or winter. A single lemon tree has been known to produce 3,000 lemons a year. This is because lemon trees bloom and ripen fruit every month of the year. The most fruit is produced between January and May.

The best lemons have skin of an oily, fine texture and are heavy for their size. This type is more apt to be full of juice, with a minimum of seeds and waste fibers. Choose lemons of a deep yellow color for ripeness and juice. They should be firm, but not hard, to the touch. Avoid using lemons that show signs of bruises, as fruits that have been mechanically injured are more subject to mold. Decay on the fruit appears as a mold or a discolored soft area at the stem end. Shriveled or hard-skinned fruits, or those that are soft or spongy to the touch, are not desirable. They may be old, dried out, mechanically injured, or affected by a rot at the center.

Lemon juice makes a good substitute for vinegar, especially in salad dressing, and for flavorings generally. Use a little lemon juice to cut the sweetness in very sweet fruit juices and use lemons in milk or cream, or canned milk, to curdle it, or when you want to make cheese. Use lemon to soften water to make an excellent rinse.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

The lemon is rich in alkaline elements. Fresh lemon juice is an outstanding source of vitamin C. However, most of this valuable vitamin is lost if the juice is left exposed to air too long. Lemons are high in potassium, rich in vitamin B, and maybe considered a good source of vitamin G. Both lemons and limes contain 5-6 percent citric acid as compared with oranges, which contain 1 to 2 percent. The lemon is classified as an acid fruit, along with other citrus fruits, cranberries, loganberries, loquats, pineapples, pomegranates, strawberries and tamrinds.

Lemons are ideal for getting rid of toxic materials in the body, but citric acid in lemons can really stir up inactive acids and inactive toxic settlements of the body. The mineral content of the lemon is alkaline-forming in its ash. However, before this alkaline ash goes into the tissues, the citric acid is stirring up many of the acids in the body and it is difficult to get rid of the toxic conditions. We cannot get rid of these toxins because the kidneys, bowels, lungs and skin are not throwing off the body acids fast enough. When these acids are not thrown off quickly enough, they stay in the body becoming so active that academia and other irritating conditions may arise. A person with a highly acid stomach and acid reactions in the body will find that he/she is allergic to many foods. Citric acid would not produce as many irritating effects in persons with this problem if they would first make sure that the eliminative organs were working properly.

Lemons, and all citric acid fruits, are good in cases of putrefaction, especially of the liver. In many cases, they will help stirrup any latent toxic settlements in the body that cannot be eliminated any other way. Lemon drinks help tremendously when we need to remove the impurities and fermentative effects of a bad liver. We have often used citric acid diets with excellent results. But citric acid juices do thin the blood and we must remember that the elimination diet is only a part of what we require for right living.

Lemons are wonderful for throat trouble and catarrh. At the first sign of a cold, drink a glass of warm, unsweetened lemonade, and the cold maybe prevented. Lemons may aid in digestion and can strengthen resistance. A little lemon and the yolk of a raw egg in a glass of orange juice is an excellent mild laxative, as well as a nutritious drink. But, if you are extremely irritable, nervous, sensitive, or highly toxic, use vegetable juices or vegetable broths instead of citric acid fruits.

Lemons are wonderful for fevers, because a feverish body responds to citric acid fruits better than any other food. If we could live correctly, we would find that citrus fruits are one of the most wonderful foods to put in the body. By “living correctly,” I , mean that if the skin is eliminating properly, it would be able to take care of its share of the waste materials that have to be eliminated. When the skin is not eliminating well and acids are stirred up with citrus fruit, the kidneys have to do more work than they are capable of doing. In this case, it is best to use vegetable juices instead of citrus juice to avoid stirring up the toxemia acids in the body. Vegetable juices carry off toxemia acids and act more as a sedative. Before we use lemons, we should make sure that the eliminative organs are working well, because if they are not, the citric acid will cause over activity. This over activity will result in constant catarrhal discharges, as well as many highly acid reactions in the body.

Lemons can be used very effectively in cases of influenza. My late teacher, Dr. V. G. Rocine, gave me this remedy for influenza many years ago: Bake a lemon for twenty minutes in the oven. Cut it in half and squeeze one half of the baked lemon into a glass of hot water. Drink this every half hour, as long as the fever is present.

The lemon seems to have the properties of increasing elimination through the skin, and therefore helps reduce the fever. The lemon also has certain effects on the germ life found in influenza, since it is a wonderful germicide. In fact, there are at least twenty different germs that can be destroyed by the use of lemon itself. To make this influenza remedy more complete, Dr. Rocine used a boneset tea along with it to control the calcium that is necessary whenever there is a fever.

Nutrients in One Pound (including peel)

Calories: 90

Protein: 3.3 g

Fat: 0.9 g

Carbohydrates: 41 g

Calcium: 274 mg

Phosphorus: 67 mg

Iron: 3.1 mg

Vitamin A: 301 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.06 mg

Riboflavin: 0.18 mg

Niacin: 0.9 mg

Ascorbic acid: 346 mg

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