Foundation for Advancement in Cancer Therapy

Non-Traditional Approaches to
the Theories, Treatments and Prevention of Cancer

Pea

September 26, 2011

Filed under: Foods of the Week, What's New? — admin @ 5:58 am

Evidence shows that the pea has been around since prehistoric times. Although the pea is of uncertain origin, it is probably native to Central Europe or Central Asia. It is also probable that peas were brought from Greece or Italy by the Aryans 2,000 years before Christ.

The green pea is a natural soluble mixture of starch and protein. Fresh peas are alkaline-forming, while dried peas have a tendency to produce allergic reactions and to cause gas, particularly when eaten with too much protein or concentrated starch. The best quality pea is one that is young, fresh, tender, and sweet. Use fresh, young peas in order to obtain the greatest food value and flavor. The pod should be velvety soft to the touch, fresh in appearance, and bright green in color. The pods should be well filled and the peas well developed, but not bulging. The large ripe pea is really a seed and should not be considered a vegetable.

The real “sugar” pea is grown primarily in Europe and is little known in the United States. Because Chinese food is so popular in this country, there is a variety of pea grown and picked for the thick, soft, green pods that are used in these dishes. Their roughage is great for the intestinal tract, and they are very nourishing. However, this herbaceous, tendril-climbing legume can be eaten, pod and all, in any variety, if picked young enough. Those people who are troubled with a lot of gas or with a sensitive stomach wall or intestinal tract may find the hulls of the more mature pea irritating. In such cases, the peas should be pureed, or liquefied, to avoid irritating disturbances.

Fresh green peas tend to lose their sugar content unless they are refrigerated to about 32 degrees F shortly after being picked. They should be cooked soon after they have been picked, for they lose their tenderness and sweetness as they age. Shell just before cooking, retaining a few of the pods to cook with the peas for additional flavor. Cook in as little water as possible, so that no water need be discarded after cooking. If some pot liquor does remain after cooking, use it soup or as a base in the liquefied vegetable drink.

Never cook peas in bicarbonate of soda water in order to keep their fresh green appearance. This method not only destroys the food value and digestibility of the pea, but is totally unnecessary. Peas cooked in a vessel that is vapor-sealed or that has a tight lid, or steamed in parchment paper, with little water, retain their flavor, greenness, and vitamins. When combined with carrots or turnips, peas are particularly tasty, and when a little onion is added, they need not be seasoned. If seasoning is desired, add a little dehydrated broth powder after cooking and serve with butter.

The pea is a fairly rich source of incomplete protein. As an alkaline ash vegetable, it is highly nutritious when eaten raw, and is more easily digested than beans. However, it takes a strong digestive tract to properly digest raw peas. To eat in their raw state, liquefy, and combine with other vegetables, proteins, or starches, to help aid in their digestion. Do not combine with fruits.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

This alkaline-reacting vegetable is an outstanding source of vitamins A, B1, and C. The pea pods are very high in chlorophyll, iron, and calcium-controlling properties. Discarded pods are discarded vitamins and valuable minerals. Fresh garden peas are slightly diuretic in action. They also give relief to ulcer pains in the stomach because they help use up the stomach acids. In cases of ulcers, however, peas should be pureed. People who have a vitamin A deficiency should eat them raw, liquefied, or in juice. They should be eaten in combination with non-starchy vegetables to get the full value of the vitamin A they contain.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 201

Protein: 13.7g

Fat: 9.8g

Carbohydrates: 36.1g

Calcium: 45mg

Phosphorus: 249mg

Iron: 3.9mg

Vitamin A: 1,390 I.U.

Thiamine: .69mg

Riboflavin: .33mg

Niacin: 5.5mg

Ascorbic Acid: 54mg

Lima Bean

September 19, 2011

Filed under: Foods of the Week, What's New? — admin @ 6:00 am

Records found in old Peruvian tombs show that lima beans have been around for centuries. European explorers found this vegetable in Lima, Peru, and this is where the name comes from. Lima beans probably originated in Guatemala, and are still grown in tropical regions.

The flourishing dry lima bean industry of southern California seems to have started in 1865. In this year, Henry Lewis bought a few hundred pounds of lima bean seeds from a tramp steamer from Peru that had put in port at Santa Barbara. Most of the dry lima bean crop is produced along the Pacific coast from Santa Ana to Santa Barbara, and Florida is also a large producer of lima beans. The peak months of supply are July through October.

There are two types of lima beans. The large “potato” type have large pods and are fleshy and not likely to split at maturity. The baby lima bean is an annual plant that matures early. The pods are small and numerous, and are likely to split open at maturity.

When selecting lima beans, look for quality pods that are fresh, bright green in color, and well-filled. Lima beans, when shelled, should be plump with tender skins, green to greenish white. The skin should puncture when it is tested. Hard, tough skins mean that the bean is over mature, and these beans usually lack flavor. Lima beans are often called “butter” beans.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Lima beans can be used either dry or fresh. Fresh lima beans are alkaline and have high protein value. Dry limas are hard to digest, and the dry skin is irritating to an inflamed digestive system. Lima beans are beneficial to the muscular system.

Lima beans are excellent as a puree in soft diets for stomach disorders. They make a tasty baked dish, such as bean loaf. One pound of lima beans contains as many nutrients as two pounds of meat!

Dry beans have high protein content of almost 18%, but fresh beans are only 4% protein. The kidney bean and navy bean are very similar in makeup and therapeutic value to the lima bean.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (unshelled)

Calories: 234

Protein: 13.6 g

Fat: 1.5 g

Carbohydrates: 42.8 g

Calcium: 115 mg

Phosphorus: 288 mg

Iron: 4.2 mg

Vitamin A: 520 I.U.

Thiamine: .38 mg

Riboflavin: .21 mg

Niacin: 2.5 mg

Ascorbic acid: 48 mg

Spice of the Month: Cinnamon

September 13, 2011

Filed under: Spice of the Month — Tags: — ggrieser @ 5:54 pm

cinnamon-bspCinnamon (Cinnamomum cassia, Cinnamomum zeylanicum), believed to have come originally from Sri Lanka, is the dried, fragrant bark of the cinnamon tree.

In the ancient world, cinnamon was more precious than gold – not too surprising though, as in Egypt gold was abundant and, thus, a fairly common ornamental metal.Nero, emperor of Rome in the first century A.D., burned a year’s supply of cinnamon on his wife’s funeral pyre — an extravagant gesture meant to signify the depth of his loss.

Egyptians used cinnamon medicinally to treat coughing, hoarseness and sore throats and as a flavoring for beverages. Because of its preservative qualities, the spice was rubbed into meats to inhibit bacterial growth, delaying spoilage, with the added bonus that the strong cinnamon aroma masked the stench of aged meats. It was also used in embalming,where body cavities were filled with spiced preservatives (mummification).

Preparation and Storage

Cinnamon comes in ‘quills’, strips of bark rolled one in another. Whole quills will keep their flavor indefinitely. Unfortunately it is difficult to grind, so for many recipes the powdered variety will be preferred. Like other powdered spices, cinnamon loses flavor quickly, so should be purchased in small quantities and kept away from light in airtight containers.

Medicinal Properties

Ironically, studies have found that cinnamon, a spice most often used in sweet confections, actually helps control blood sugar. People with Type II diabetes taking one gram (about 1/2 tsp.) of cinnamon a day for three months experienced a drop in blood sugar, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine (09/10/09). This amount of cinnamon per day also has been shown to reduce cholesterol (especially LDL or “bad cholesterol) and triglyceride levels by as much as 20% in Type II diabetes patients. Controlling diabetes can help prevent coronary artery disease and high blood pressure.

American researchers found that cinnamon may slow angiogenesis, the development of new blood supplies to tumors. Their conclusion, published in the journal Carcinogenesis, was that that an extract of the spice “could potentially be useful in cancer prevention and/or treatment.”

Cinnamon is being recommended to help curb the urge for tobacco. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) recommends chewing cinnamon sticks when trying to quit the use of tobacco. Another effective product that people use to help with overeating and tobacco use is cinnamon toothpicks.

Old folk remedies use cinnamon in preparations to combat diarrhea and morning sickness

because it’s a carminative (an agent that helps break up intestinal gas). Due to its mild astringency, it is particularly useful in infantile diarrhea. The spice is also a good source of manganese, fiber, iron, and calcium.

A study by Alan Hirsch, M.D. at the Smell and Taste Treatment and Research Foundation in Chicago found cinnamon scored high as an aphrodisiac for males. Another Study, conducted by Phillip R. Zoladz, Ph.D., assistant professor of psychology at Ohio Northern University, discovered that, after smelling or tasting cinnamon, students scored better on several mental performance tests, showing improved memory, more focused attention, faster reflexes. Researchers concluded that cinnamon has potential for decreasing test anxiety and even preventing age-related memory loss.

In the Kitchen

In Medieval Europe, Cinnamon was a staple ingredient, along with ginger, in many recipes. Since most meals were prepared in a single cauldron, casseroles containing both meat and fruit were common and cinnamon helped bridge the flavors. When the Christian Crusaders (11th – 13th centuries) brought home sugar, it too was added to the pot. Mince pie is a typical combination of this period, which still survives.

Today, cinnamon, is used in many dessert dishes — cakes and other baked goods, milk and rice puddings, chocolate dishes and fruit desserts, particularly apples and pears. In many Middle Eastern and North African dishes, it’s popular in flavoring lamb tagines or stuffed aubergines (eggplant). It is added to curries and pilau and in garam masala (Indian spice blend). It may be used to spice mulled wines, creams and syrups. The largest importer of Sri Lankan cinnamon is Mexico, where it is drunk with coffee and chocolate and brewed as a tea.

Sprinkle cinnamon onto apples, bananas, melons and oranges for a flavor kick. Add it to rice pilaf and stir it into hot cocoa. Mix cinnamon with mint and parsley in ground beef for burgers and meatloaf.

Sources:

The Epicentre: Encyclopedia of Spices
Healing Spices by Bharat Aggarwal, PhD (Sterling Publishing)
About.com: Homecooking

SPINACH

September 12, 2011

Filed under: Foods of the Week, What's New? — admin @ 6:12 am

Spinach is a small, fleshy-leaved annual of the goose-foot family. It is a quick-maturing, cool season crop that is hardy and will live outdoors over winter throughout most of the area from New Jersey southward along the Atlantic Coast and in most parts of the lower South. Spinach has been both praised and abused. It has been popularized in the comic strips by the herculean feats of Popeye the sailor. On the other hand, Dr. Thurman B. Rice of the Indiana State Board of Health says, “If God had intended for us to eat spinach he would have flavored it with something.” But flavoring is a job for cooks. The way spinach is thrown in a pot with a large quantity of water and boiled for a half hour or more, it’s a wonder even Popeye relished it. Spinach should be cooked in a steamer with very little or no added water other than that clinging to the leaves after washing. If you insist on boiling it, again use only the water clinging to the leaves after washing, and cook in a covered pan for not more than ten minutes.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Spinach is an excellent source of both vitamins C and A, as well as iron, it also contains about 40 percent potassium. It leaves an alkaline ash in the body. Spinach is good for the lymphatic, urinary, and digestive systems. Spinach has a laxative effect and is wonderful in weight-loss diets. It has a high calcium content, but also contains oxalic acid. This acid combines with calcium to form a compound that the body cannot absorb. For this reason, the calcium in spinach is considered unavailable as a nutrient. This is of small importance, however, in the ordinary diet. The oxalic acid factor would become important only if a person relied largely on spinach for calcium. The only effect the acid would have is if a large quantity of spinach juice were taken. This might cause disturbing results in the joints.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 89

Protein: 10.4g

Fat: 1.4g

Carbohydrates: 14.5g

Calcium: 368mg

Phosphorus: 167mg

Iron: 13.6mg

Vitamin A: 26,450 I.U.

Thiamine: .5mg

Riboflavin: .93mg

Niacin: 2.7mg

Ascorbic Acid: 167mg

Endive and Escarole

September 6, 2011

Filed under: Foods of the Week, What's New? — admin @ 6:13 am

Native to the East Indies, endive and escarole were introduced into Egypt and Greece at a very early period and references to them appear in history. The plants were brought to America by colonists. Endive is closely related botanically to chicory and the two names are sometimes incorrectly used as synonyms. Escarole is another name for a type of endive with broad leaves and a well-blanched heart. The word “endive” is used to designate plants with narrow, finely divided, curly leaves. These greens are used raw in salad, or may be cooked like spinach. The slightly bitter flavor adds zest to a mixed salad.

Crispness, freshness, and tenderness are essential factors of quality. Wilted plants, especially those that have brown leaves, are undesirable, as are plants with tough, coarse leaves. Such leaves will be excessively bitter. Tenderness can be determined by breaking or twisting a leaf. In the unblanched condition leaves should be green, but when blanched, center leaves should be creamy white or yellowish white.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Escarole and endive are very high in vitamin A, and work very well in ridding the body of infections. They are both high in iron and potassium and are alkaline in reaction. Escarole and endive are both useful as an appetite stimulant because of their bitter ingredients. Escarole also helps to activate the bile. They are best when used raw.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (both escarole and endive)

Calories: 80

Protein: 6.8g

Fat: .4g

Carbohydrates: 16.4g

Calcium: 323mg

Phosphorus: 216mg

Iron: 6.8mg

Vitamin A: 13,170 I.U.

Thiamine: .27mg

Riboflavin: .56mg

Niacin: 2mg

Ascorbic Acid: 42mg

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