Foundation for Advancement in Cancer Therapy

Non-Traditional Approaches to
the Theories, Treatments and Prevention of Cancer

Rethinking Cancer Newsletter #35

November 28, 2012

Filed under: Rethinking Cancer Newsletters — ggrieser @ 7:24 pm

We receive many emails from people around the world looking for individual help for themselves or for a loved one. However, as an educational organization, we are not permitted to provide individual medical advice or prescription. Our goal is to make this website a repository of the widest range of information, derived from our 40 plus years, so that you can become your own best medical advisor. This is why we’re continually adding new material, as well as working to build up our Practitioner Directory - sponsoring doctor training programs, seeking out healthcare practitioners and clinics worldwide who have in-depth experience in the Biorepair concepts we support – all made possible by the donations we receive.

Natural Healing is very different from conventional doctoring. It requires knowledge and active participation on the part of the patient. The patient, not the doctor or well meaning friends or relatives, is in charge of his/her path to healing. But it’s valuable to have a good support network, including partnering with a competent medical advisor, whether M.D., naturopath, nutritional expert, etc. In our experience, those who have a clear understanding of the concepts of Biorepair – how their body works and what materials and conditions they need to regain and maintain good health – are the best positioned to find a competent advisor and achieve the results they’re seeking.

We always love to hear from readers and are glad to offer general information and guidelines when possible. But perhaps the best place to begin is with our article “What is the Point of RethinkingCancer.org?” – the link for which is now prominently displayed on the Home page under “What Is F.A.C.T.?”

To your health!
Foundation for Advancement in Cancer Therapy (F.A.C.T.)

P.S. Another way to embark on the great adventure of Natural Healing is with our DVD, Rethinking Cancer(all sales of which are U.S. tax-deductible donations.) As always, we hope you’ll be in touch on Twitter and Facebook and check out our YouTube channel.

Is Organic Worth the Expense?

A recent Stanford University study caused a big flurry when it concluded that organically-grown food is not necessarily more nutritious than factory-farmed, though organic had fewer pesticides.

Many criticized the study because it was based on a questionable evaluation of previous studies and for its very narrow concept of “nutritious”as just about nutrients rather than the overall health value of a food. Wouldn’t it be more nutritious in the long term to get your nutrients from vegetables without synthetic poisons rather than chemically-laced produce? Wouldn’t pesticide-free food be better for the health of the environment, which, of course, ultimately impacts the health of everyone? Some pundits, however, reacted to the news with glee, declaring, aha, just as they’d always thought: organics is just an elitist fad and that, if we’re really serious about feeding the world’s hungry, we must use chemical fertilizers, pesticides, genetically-modified crops and other big Agra “advanced” industrial methods of food production.

We find this latter view insulting and ill informed. Here’s one informed response from Marion Nestle, professor in the Department of Nutrition, Food Studies and Public Health at New York University, author of Why Calories Count: From Science to Politics and blogger at FoodPolitics.comRead More

Dry Skin Brushing -
Your 3-5 Minute Daily Detox

Here’s an easy, invigorating way to start the day: dry skin brushing.

The skin is our largest organ of elimination, sometimes called the third kidney because of its role in detoxifying the body. Toxins exit the body through the pores by sweating, which is why aerobic exercise, saunas, and steam baths are good detoxifying aids. But it’s quite common for the skin to get clogged with cosmetics, dead skin cells or other metabolic wastes. If the skin isn’t breathing properly, additional stress is put on the liver and kidneys to detoxify.

Daily dry skin brushing, used for centuries by Scandinavians and Russians, is a simple technique that removes dead skin cells and helps keep the elimination channels open. It promotes circulation, stimulates the lymphatic system – a vital part of the body’s immune system, improves skin elasticity and tone, and generally energizes the whole body. Read More

Cacao – The Real Deal

Not too long ago, the news rang out: chocolate, the quintessential decadent pleasure, is actually good for our health! Mass rejoicing ensued, as all manner of chocolate bars flew off the shelves. Unfortunately, the media neglected to point out that the good news had nothing to do with the typical commercial, highly processed, sugar and chemical-laden type chocolate. What’s good is cacao, the powder that gives chocolate its distinct flavor – the rest is filler, the cause of so many health problems!

Cacao (Theobroma cacao, meaning “food of the gods”) is the fruit (i.e., bean) of the cacao tree that was the key ingredient in a ceremonial drink to honor the gods of the Aztecs, Mayans and other ancient peoples of Central and South America. Believed to possess great strengthening and healing powers, the drink was imbibed daily in vast quantities. Aztec leader Montezuma was said to have drunk 50 cups a day!

Numerous studies now show that those early cacao connoisseurs were attuned to something special. Forget about regular chocolate! Cacao, preferably raw, but often roasted, and available in different forms – beans, butter, nibs or powder – is one of the richest sources of flavanols, plant compounds that protect the heart in a multitude of ways, as well as help prevent stroke, diabetes, cancer and other chronic degenerative diseases so common in our advanced industrialized age. Cacao is also high in minerals, especially calcium, iron and, one of the most deficient minerals in modern cultures, magnesium, vital to over 300 essential metabolic reactions – all of which may explain the ancients good feeling when they imbibed copious amounts. Read More

Raw Chocolate Bars Supreme

1/4 – 1/3 cup agave/maple syrup/raw honey, or you can use a paste of dates and water
3/4 cup raw cacao powder
2/3 cup coconut butter or oil, melted on very low heat just until liquified
dash seasalt (opt.)

  1. Mix all the ingredients together in a bowl until smooth and ridiculously delicious-looking. This is the basic recipe, but you can take it to another level by stirring in additional healthy ingredients, like vanilla, maca powder, ground cayenne, cloves, cinnamon, minced figs, chopped nuts, peppermint or almond extract, orange or lemon zest, shredded coconut, cacao nibs, etc. Possibilities are endless! (Dry ingredients can be mixed separately from the liquids. Combine and adjust consistency by adding a little more dry or wet. Experiment with different consistencies – thinner gives a more delicate but brittle bar; on the thicker side makes for harder, hunkier pieces.)
  2. Pour the mixture into a large dinner or soup plate. Spread the “batter” out more or less evenly. Place in the fridge for an hour or so to harden. Crack into edible pieces and eat! That’s it! (This keeps well for weeks in a container in the fridge or freezer, but usually doesn’t last that long!)

Note: The amounts here are approximate, so feel free to improvise. Just try to keep the consistency from getting too watery thin or too thick and stiff. Exactitude is not necessary because, honestly, it’s very hard to mess this one up. It’s gonna taste great and be really good for you pretty much no matter what you do!

Orange

November 26, 2012

The citrus fruit is one of the oldest fruits known in the history of cultivation. As early as 500 B.C. the fruit of the citrus tree was mentioned in a collection of old documents believed to be edited by Confucius himself. In the year A.D. 1178, Han Yen-Chi, a Chinese horticulturist, wrote on the subject of oranges, and the seedless orange was mentioned in these writings. This author speaks of twenty-seven varieties of “very valuable and precious” oranges.

Oranges were originally brought from China to India, and gradually spread over the entire world where the climate was mild enough for their cultivation. The sour orange, or “Naranga,” as it was referred to in Sanskrit about A.D. 100. came into cultivation in the basin of the Mediterranean long before the fall of the Roman Empire. The sweet variety, or “Airavata,” does not appear to have been cultivated until early in the fifteenth century, and then became so popular that it was soon being cultivated extensively throughout Southern Europe. The Moors brought the Seville orange from the East.

Wild oranges were found in the West Indies and Brazil as early as1600. The early Spanish explorers are believed to have brought oranges with them to this country in the time of Ponce de Leon’s quest for the Fountain of Youth. In California, the orange was cultivated at the San Diego Mission in 1769 and, in the year 1804, 400 seedlings grew into a grove of considerable size around the San Gabriel Mission. The popularity of the orange, particularly in the favorable climate of California, grew rapidly, until it soon developed into a leading industry. The orange became known as “California’s liquid sunshine.”

The original orange was very small, bitter, and full of seeds, but through constant efforts in cross-fertilization and selection, many varieties of this delicious fruit are now cultivated with a tremendous improvement in the quality of the fruit. The sweet oranges are, by far, the most popular, while the sour orange is used more for its propagating stock than for its fruit. Unless killed by frost or fire, the orange tree lives to an old age and continues to bear fruit throughout its lifetime.

More than two hundred varieties of oranges are grown in the United States. In 1919 the United States produced only about 25 percent of the world’s total output of oranges, but now it produces about half. Oranges comprise about 60 percent of the citrus fruit grown in the United States.

Oranges are available every day of the year, but are most abundant in the United States from January to May. California, Florida, and Texas are the orange-producing states, and each of these states ships great quantities. California’s vast Valencia orange acreage is now more extensive than the Navel orange plantings. This state now has about 150.000 acres of Valendas, and about 100,000 acres of Navels, with an additional few thousand acres of miscdanmus orange varieties. The largest proportion of the California orange crop-about 85 to 90 percent, comes from southern California.

Choose the first oranges of the season, for they are the richest in mineral values. Tree-ripened oranges have, by far, the greatest mineral content. The best quality orange is firm and heavy, has a fine-textured skin varying in texture according to variety, and is well-colored. The light orange lacks juice. Avoid the soft, flabby, or shriveled orange and those oranges with any soft or moldy areas upon them. Do not eat unripe oranges because they can cause stomach upsets. particularly in small children. Once the skin is cut or broken, the fruit should be eaten immediately as the vitamin C is banned by exposure to the air. If orange juice is kept for a period of time, store in the refrigerator in an airtight container.

The orange is classified as a subtropical fruit and has a citric add content of 1.5 percent. This alkaline-reacting fruit is best eaten with other tropical or subtropical fruits, with add fruits, or with nuts or milk. It is best to avoid eating this fruit with starches or sweets, or with dried fruits.

Use oranges as a dessert fruit, with yogurt, or in combination salads. Make a cup of a segmented orange the thick-skinned seedless orange is best for segmenting-and nil with cottage cheese. Make liquefied drinks, mixing orange juice with other subtropical or tropical fruits such as cactus fruits, loquats, mango, papaya, persimmon, pineapple, pomegranate, apples, and citrus fruits. Many have advised eating oranges or drinking orange juice with meals, early in the morning on an empty stomach, or directly following a meal if the body is in a highly add condition.

The orange is one of the best sources of water-soluble vitamin C. The absence or insufficiency of this causes scurvy. As vitamin C is the least stable of all the vitamins, storage of orange juice at low temperature destroys the vitamin to some extent, and sterilization may destroy it completely. Generally, it is best to use the citric add fruits in sections rather than in juices. When the orange is eaten in sections, the mineral material found in the pulp will help to neutralize the citric add effect as it goes into the body.

Citrus fruits are high in sodium, but only when completely matured in the sunshine. The fruit acids from green or immature fruit cause many adverse body reactions.

If the section and bulk of the orange is fresh and sweet, it is an excellent food for children as a supplement for those who must drink cow’s milk, or any milk, because it seems to help in the retention of calcium in the body. Ripe oranges contain as much as 10 percent fruit sugar, which can be immediately assimilated by the body.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Oranges are the most popular source of Vitamin C. They are excellent for treating over acid body conditions, constipation, or a particularly sluggish intestinal tract. In cases of acidosis, drink orange juice, or eat oranges after meals. If the intestinal tract is not functioning properly, drink a large glass of orange juice upon wakening in the morning, or about one-half hour before breakfast. In the cases of stomach acid deficiency, start the meal with a peeled orange or a glass of orange juice.

Those who suffer from tooth decay or poor gums are probably lacking in vitamin C and should drink large amounts of orange juice for a period of a few weeks. People with gastric and duodenal ulcers are deficient in ascorbic acid, and their diet should be supplemented with a high potency vitamin C such as that found in fresh oranges and orange juice.

Orange are very good for elimination. They stir up the acid accumulations and catarrhal settlements in the body very quickly. However, sometimes this is not a good idea if the channels of elimination, such as skin and kidneys, are not able to take out these acids fast enough.

Eat the whole orange, excluding the very outer skin, to get all the good from the fruit. The luscious orange is rated tops in importance in the contribution to health.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 164

Protein: 2.9g

Fat: 0.7 g

Carbohydrates: 36.6 g

Calcium: 108 mg

Phosphorus: 75 mg

Iron: 1.3 mg

Vitamin A: 9101 I.U.

Thiamine: .25mg

Riboflavin: .08 mg

Niacin: .08 mg

Ascorbic acid: 162 mg

Potato

November 19, 2012

The potato is one vegetable that is abundant throughout the year. It comes in many varieties. Though called “Irish”, the white potato is native to the mountains of tropical America from Chile to Mexico, and was widely cultivated in South America at the time of the Spanish Conquest. The Spaniards introduced the potato into Europe early in the sixteenth century, and it was Sir Walter Raleigh who showed England how to eat the potato with beef gravy. He, too, started the potato fad in colonial Virginia, but it was Sir Francis Drake who was supposed to have brought the potato to Ireland. The potato soon became second only to Indian corn as the most important food contribution of the Americas, and is now one of the most valuable vegetable crops in the world.

The potato is classed as a protective vegetable because of its high vitamin C content. It has been noted in the past that, as the potato became common, scurvy, which is prevalent where vitamin C is absent, became uncommon, and soon disappeared almost entirely in potato-eating countries.

If we had to confine ourselves to one food, the potato is the one on which we could live almost indefinitely, exclusive of other foods, as it is a complete food in itself. It was Professor Hinhede of Denmark, a food scientist during the last war, who proved to the world that a person could live on potatoes for a long period of time without any depreciation of body energy. In fact he and his assistant lived three years solely on potatoes-raw and cooked. He not only proved the potato to be a complete food, but he also showed how inexpensive a diet it was at a cost of approximately only six cents a day. It is good, however, to eat potatoes with other vegetables; eating them by themselves may eventually cause constipation.

When selecting potatoes make sure they are smooth, shallow-eyed, and reasonably unblemished. Avoid the extra large .potato as it may have a hollow or pithy center. Potatoes with a slight green color are sunburned and may have developed a bitter taste.

The energy value of the potato is approximately the same as bread, but it is a far better balanced food than bread, particularly in its content of potassium, iron, and vitamins C, B1 , and G. The potato is also lower in calories. Because potatoes are a starchy food, they put less work on the kidneys.

It is best to eat potatoes in as raw a form as possible. However, raw, cut potatoes should be eaten as soon as they are cut, as their oxidation is very rapid. I know of no other food that will turn green, ferment, and break down quicker than potatoes will when they have been juiced.

Potatoes may be sliced raw and used in salads. Juice them, mixed with parsley, beets, or other vegetables for flavor. Potato juice is . a great rejuvenator and is a quick way to get an abundance of vitamin C as well as other vitamins and minerals. Why not munch on a raw potato? It is no more peculiar for a child to eat a piece of raw potato than it is for him to eat a raw apple.

Instead of throwing away the potato peeling, eat it, because it is rich in mineral elements. At least 60 percent of the potassium contained in the potato lies so close to the skin that it cannot be saved if the potato is peeled. Furthermore, potassium is a salt, and you do not need to salt potatoes if the potato peelings are used. If you feel you need more seasoning, use a mineral broth powder (dehydrated vegetables) instead of table salt. Even using sweet butter in place of salted butter is better, and is not difficult to get used to when the flavor is enhanced with the addition of broth powder.

There are numerous ways to prepare and serve potatoes. They have a bland flavor, so they can be used frequently in meals. It is best to cook potatoes on a low heat, if possible, and if they are not baked they should be cooked in a vapor-sealed vessel to retain their goodness. The art of cooking can be used to build or to destroy.

It is necessary that we realize the difference between a properly steamed potato and a boiled potato-one is alkaline and the other is acid. According to the Bureau of Home Economics, United States Department of Agriculture, when ordinary cooking methods are used, from 32 to 76 percent of the essential food values, minerals, and vitamins are lost due to oxidation, or are destroyed by heat or dissolved in water. In a vapor-sealed utensil, oxidation is practically eliminated, less heat is required, and waterless cooking is possible . The vitamins and minerals are preserved for you and are not carried away by escaping steam.

The outside of the potato is the positive side. The negative side is the inside. The inside is carbohydrate and is acid in body reaction. So, it is best, when making alkalinizing broths for example, that you discard the center of the potato before adding the potato to the broth ingredients. Throw this part of the potato into your garden if you have one and it will do its part to rebuild the soil.

In preparing potatoes for cooking, scrub and wash them thoroughly. Use a stiff brush to remove the dirt. To bake, drop them first in very hot water to heat them, then rub them with oil to keep their skins from getting too hard in the process of baking and to help them be more easily digested. Remember to bake them at a slow oven heat. In the last five minutes of baking raise the oven heat to about 400°F to break down the starch grains.

Before serving baked potatoes, they may be cut in half, scooped out, and mashed with nut butter, avocado, or a little grated cheese. Garnish with parsley or chives. Or, take plain, baked potatoes, split open, and serve with a Roquefort, cream, and chive dressing.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Potatoes leave an alkaline ash in the body, are low in roughage, and may be used in the treatment of acidosis. They can also be used for catarrhal conditions.

When trying to overcome catarrhal conditions, cut the potato peeling about a half-inch thick and use it in broth or soup, cooking very little. The resulting broth will contain many important mineral elements.

Potato soup can also be used to great advantage in cases of uric acid, kidney, and stomach disorders, and for replacing minerals in the system. To make potato soup, peel six potatoes, making sure the peelings are about three-quarters of an inch thick. Place in water in a covered kettle and simmer twenty minutes. Add celery to change the flavor if desired. Add okra powder if the stomach is irritated.

The potassium in the potato is strongly alkaline, which makes for good liver activation, elastic tissues, and supple muscles. It also produces body grace and a good disposition. Potassium is the ”healer” of the body and is very necessary in rejuvenation. It is good heart element also, and potatoes can be used very well in all cases of heart troubles.

Anyone with ailments on the left side of the body-the negative side, or the heart and intestinal side of the body-can use carbohydrates that are negative in character. Potatoes are one of the best negative foods to use for building up the left side of the body.

To use an old remedy, take slices of potatoes and use as a pack over any congested part of the body. This type of pack draws out static, toxic material, or venous congestion in any part of the body. Use a narrow, thumb-shaped piece of potato to help correct hemorrhoid conditions.

To control diarrhea, cook potato soup with milk. The milk controls the diarrhea-it has a constipating effect, if boiled. The potato adds bulk, which is also necessary to control this trouble.

The raw potato juice is one of the most volatile juices and the strongest juice that can be taken into the body. It is used in many cases of intestinal disorders, as well as for rejuvenation.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (raw and pared)

Calories 279

Protein 7.6g

Fat 0.4g

Carbohydrates 6.8g

Calcium 26mg

Phosphorus 195mg

Iron 2.7g

Vitamin A trace

Thiamine 0.40mg

Riboflavin 0.15mg

Niacin 4.4 mg

Ascorbic acid 64mg

Cranberry

November 12, 2012

Cranberries are native to the swampy regions of both the temperate and arctic zones of North America and Europe. Because they grow on slender, curved stalks, suggesting the neck of a crane, they were named “crane-berry,” or “cranberry.”

Long before the first colonists arrived in this country the cranberry was in common use by the Indians. The Pilgrims found them in the low marshes near the shore on the Cape Cod peninsula, and the women preserved them as a delicacy and served them with wild turkey at Thanksgiving and Christmas feasts.

Cultivation of the cranberry began early in the nineteenth cen­tury. The earliest records show that the business was largely carried on by retired seamen. Howe and McFarlin were the names of two of these men, and important varieties of cranberries are named for them. By 1870, a flourishing business had developed. It was re­corded in 1832 that ”Captain Henry Hall of Barnstable, Massachu­setts, had then cultivated the cranberry for twenty years,” and that “Mr. F. A. Hayden of Lincoln, Massachusetts, gathered from his farm in 1830, 400 bushels of cranberries which brought him in the Boston market $600.”

It has been said that the old clipper ships out of Gloucester, New Bedford, and the “Down East” ports carried supplies of raw cranberries in casks so that the sailors could help themselves. They did this to prevent scurvy, just as the sailors of England and South­ern Europe used limes to prevent this disease.

Cranberries grow on low, thick vines in a bog. The bogs are built on peat swamps that have been cleared, drained, and leveled. Water must be available and arranged so that the bog can be drained or flooded at the appropriate time. The surface, usually sand, on top of a subsoil that will hold moisture, must be level so the bog can be covered with water to a uniform depth when neces­sary. A cranberry bog takes three to five years to come into full production.

There are only five states that produce the greater supply of cranberries for market. They are, in order of production: Massa­chusetts, Wisconsin, New Jersey, Washington, and Oregon. The berries are marketed from September through March, and the peak months are October, November, and December.

The quality of the berry is determined by its roundness and size, and from its color, which varies from light to dark crimson, depending on the degree of maturity. Some varieties of cranberries are more olive-shaped or oblong. They have a fresh, plump appear­ance combined with a high luster and firmness. Avoid a shriveled, dull, soft-appearing berry.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Cranberries have a heavy acid content, and therefore should not be eaten too frequently. They increase the acidity of the urine. Be­ cause of their extremely tart taste, people drown them in sugar syrup, which makes them unfit for human consumption. They are best if cooked first; then add raisins and a little honey.

One of the finest therapeutic uses for cranberries is as a remedy for rectal disturbances, piles, hemorrhoids, and inflammation of the rectal pouch.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 218

Protein: 1.8g

Fat: 3.18g

Carbohydrates: 51.4g

Calcium: 63.5mg

Phosphorus: 50mg

Iron: 2.7mg

Vitamin A: 182I.U.

Thiamine: .13mg

Riboflavin: .09mg

Niacin: 0.45mg

Ascorbic acid: 55mg

Squash

November 5, 2012

Squash is native to the Western Hemisphere and was known to the Indians centuries before the arrival of the white man. It is a member of the cucurbit family, which includes pumpkins and gourds as well as cucumbers, and muskmelons and watermelons. Squash as we know it today is vastly different from the kind of Narragansett Indians dubbed “askutasquas,” meaning “Green-raw-unripe” which, incidentally, was the way they ate it. We still follow their example and eat summer squash while tender and unripe, though it is usually cooked.

Squash is best when steamed or baked; some people even use it in soup. The Hubbard Squash, due to its hard shell, is usually baked in the shell. Squash maybe used to add variety to the menu. Summer squash is boiled or steamed and served as a vegetable with drawn butter or cream sauce, or it may be served mashed. The delicate flavor of summer squash is lost by boiling it in large quantities of water and, of course, nutrients are lost when the cooking water is thrown away.

Squash may be grouped in five general types; Hubbard, Banana, Turban, Mammoth, and summer. The latter are actually pumpkins. However, they are listed as squashes because that is what they are called in the market.

Summer Squash should be fresh, fairly heavy for its size, and free from blemish. The rind should be so tender that it can be punctured very easily. Hard-rind summer squash is undesirable because the flesh is likely to be stringy and the seeds and rind have to be discarded. Winter squash should have a hard rind. Soft-rind winter squash is usually immature, and the flesh may be thin and watery when cooked, and lack flavor.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Winter Squash contains more Vitamin A than summer squash. Both are low in carbohydrates and can be used in all diets. Squash is a high potassium and sodium food that leaves an alkaline ash in the body. It is very good for the eliminative system.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (winter squash)

Calories: 161

Protein: 5.0 g

Fat: 1.0 g

Carbohydrates: 39.9 g

Calcium: 71 mg

Phosphorus: 122 mg

Iron: 2.0 mg

Vitamin A: 11,920 I.U.

Thiamine: .16 mg

Riboflavin: .35 mg

Niacin: 1.9 mg

Ascorbic acid: 43 mg

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (summer squash)

Calories: 83

Protein: 4.8 g

Fat: 1.0 g

Carbohydrates: 18.5 g

Calcium: 123 mg

Phosphorus: 128 mg

Iron: 1.8 mg

Vitamin A: 1800 I.U.

Thiamine: .23 mg

Riboflavin: .38 mg

Niacin: 4.5 mg

Ascorbic acid: 75 mg

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