Foundation for Advancement in Cancer Therapy

Non-Traditional Approaches to
the Theories, Treatments and Prevention of Cancer

Melons

April 29, 2013

The many varieties of the popular melon give us certain elements not found in any other food. The honeydew melon originated in Asia, and it is believed that, as early as 2,400 B.C., this distinct type of muskmelon was growing in Egypt. The cantaloupe is native to India and Guinea and has been cultivated for more for more than 2,000 years. In Europe, it was first grown from seed transported from its native habitat.

The highly alkalizing honeydew was introduced to America in 1900 and Arizona and California have become the biggest producers. It is available the year around, but it is at its peak of abundance in July through September. The cantaloupe is available from late May through September, but is most abundant in June and July.

Both the honeydew and the casaba, which is another variety of winter melon, are usually picked before maturity and ripened off the vine. Cantaloupe, however, do not develop any additional sugar after they are picked. This melon should be picked when it is still hard and pulls off the vine smoothly, without leaving a jagged scar.

Learn to select melons by the color and firmness of their rind, and by fragrance. The cantaloupe may have a coarse netting over its surface (with a yellow, not green color beneath when ripe), or it may be of fine texture, depending again upon variety. Choose cantaloupe for their sweet fragrance. The casaba rind is golden in color and should feel heavy when ripe. A ripe honeydew has a creamy yellow surface color, and usually the scar in the blossom end yields to slight pressure.

The coloring of the flesh also is important, both as to degree of ripeness and to pleasing the eye and thus the palate. When fully ripe, casaba melons are cream in color, honeydews a yellowish cream in color, and cantaloupes either a light or dark shade of salmon, depending upon variety. Deeply colored flesh in the melon denotes that it will be high in vitamin A.

It is important to pick a thoroughly ripe watermelon in order to receive the greatest benefit. A ripe watermelon, when thumped with the fingers, has a dull, hollow sound. Another test of a good ripe melon is to try to scrape the rind with the fingernail; when the green skin comes off easily, the melon is ready to be eaten. Good watermelon has firm, crisp, juicy flesh and is never dry or fibrous.

Melons are very high in silicon, especially if eaten right down to the rind. When we discard watermelon rind, we are missing one its greatest elements. To obtain the gland- and blood-building chlorophyll, run the rind through a liquifier or juicer.

Watermelon, of course, is well-known as an efficient eliminator. Because it has such a high content of water and soluble chemicals, it can go into the bloodstream quickly and reach many of the organs of the body, depositing the chemicals needed to carry away waste.

During melon season, we should strengthen the body for the winter months with a “melon reserve” of vitamins A, B, and C, which are found in delightful form in the melon family.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Melon gives us an excellent supply of distilled water, along with the finest mineral elements possible. Many of us think we are drinking enough water, but our city water supplies do not give us “pure” water. Melons with their root system, pick up water from deep, in-ground reserves, and bring it to our tables in a delicious fruit substance. Consider the melon for rejuvenation and alkalinizing the body. Melons also are excellent for aiding elimination.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 65

Protein: 1.0 g

Fat: 0.4 g

Carbohydrates: 14.4 g

Calcium: 15 mg

Phosphorus: 25 mg

Iron: 0.4 mg

Vitamin A: 1,240 I.U.

Thiamine: .10 mg

Riboflavin: .11 mg

Niacin: 0.4 mg

Ascorbic acid: 13 mg

Beet

April 22, 2013

The beet has been cultivated for its roots and leaves since the third or fourth century B.C. It spread from the area of the Mediterranean to the Near East. In ancient times it was used only for medicinal purposes-the edible beet root we know today was unknown before the Christian era. In the fourth century beet recipes were recorded in England, and in 1810 the beet began to be cultivated for sugar in France and Germany. It is not known when the beet was first introduced to the United States, but it is known that there was one variety grown here in 1806. Sugar beets are usually yellowish-white, and are cultivated extensively in this country. The garden beet ranges from dark purplish-red to a bright vermillion to white, but the most popular commercial variety is red.

Beets are available in the markets all year. Their peak season is May through October. They are primarily grown in the southern United States, the Northeast, and the vest coast states. When selecting beets, do not just look at the condition of the leaves. Beets that remain to the ground too long become tough and woody, and can be identified by a short neck, deep scars, or several circles of leaf scars around the top of the beet.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Beets are wonderful for adding needed minerals. They can be used to eliminate pocket add material in the bowel and for ailments in the gall bladder and liver. Their vitamin A content is quite high, so they are not only good for the eliminative system, but also benefit the digestive and lymphatic systems.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (without tops)

Calories: 147

Protein: 5.4 g

Fat: 0.3 g

Carbohydrates: 32.6 g

Calcium: 51 mg

Phosphorus: 92 mg

Iron: 3.4 mg

Vitamin A: 22,700 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.07 mg

Riboflavin: 0.16 mg

Niacin: 1.5 mg

Ascorbic acid: 80 mg

Rethinking Cancer Newsletter #38

April 15, 2013

Filed under: Rethinking Cancer Newsletters — ggrieser @ 7:09 pm

Our doctor training program is bearing fruit! Thanks largely to the efforts of Dr. Philip Incao, thus far this year we’ve added 15 more doctors to our Practitioner Directory. Most are in the U.S.; all are experienced in the concepts of nutrition, detoxification, organ and skeletal integrity, stress management, etc. They may not call it Biorepair; every doctor has his/her own particular style. But they all share the understanding that focusing on enhancing the host – the condition of the whole body – is the surest path to restoring and maintaining good health. All are looking to partner with patients who are knowledgeable about this approach and ready to actively participate in their own healing. If you’re looking to partner with a doctor, a good place to start would be What is the point of RethinkingCancer.org?

It’s important to note that, should you ask any of the practitioners on our Directory if they treat cancer, they will most likely and wisely respond no, they treat the whole body. At this present time, the only legal protocols for treating cancer in the U.S. and most other advanced industrialized countries are determined by government agencies and include, but are not limited to surgery, chemotherapy and radiation.

To your health!
Foundation for Advancement in Cancer Therapy (F.A.C.T.)

P.S. Knowledge is power! Check out our ever expanding Resource page and keep tabs on us on TwitterFacebook and our YouTube channel!

Understanding Infection: Not a Battle, But a Housecleaning 
by Philip Incao, M.D.

For months, most of North America has been in high flu frenzy – masses madly spraying doorknobs and elevator buttons with chemical sanitizers, worrying “Will I be next?” Dr. Incao, featured in our film Rethinking Cancer, presents a far more logical and positive way of understanding infections like the flu that should give us confidence instead of angst.

I once saw a young African man in my practice who impressed me with his calm dignity and his radiant good health. I asked him what his parents had done when, as a child, he had come down with a fever. He replied that they had wrapped him in blankets to get him sweating. “Did they ever take your temperature?” I asked. He laughed and shook his head saying, “No, it was different from what is done here.” We often hear that American medicine is the most advanced in the world. This is true in some areas of healthcare, but in other areas we could use a little of the deeply rooted wisdom that still informs some of the folk medicine in the developing world. I think this particularly applies to our modern concept and treatment of the illnesses we commonly call “infections.” Read More

Grassroots rising! The Fight for Organic Food in China

China is known for many things, but food safety is not one of them! In fact, food scandals run rampant in this country of 1.3 billion, e.g., mercury in baby formula; cabbages sprayed with formaldehyde; artificial peas; used cooking oil scooped out of gutters for recycling, right along with the sewage; grilled kebabs made from cat meat; ink and paraffin used to dress up cheap noodles; pork buns so loaded with bacteria they glow in the dark, etc. According to Chinese magazineCaixin, “…these publicized food safety scandals represent only a fraction of unsafe food production practices. Hundreds of chemical food additives are pumped into products that Chinese people consume every day.”

But out of scandal, new movements are born! Activists, determined to take charge of the quality of their food, are arising from the Chinese countryside. Lifen Yang is part of this new phenomenon. She’s joined in an effort to bring organic food to Kunming, a city in the Yunnan Province of China. After graduating from University and working in business, she found a way to go back to the farm and fight for healthy, chemical-free food. Her story gives hope for a healthier food future in China.Watch the video.

Source: theperennialplate.com

Is Coffee Good for You?

Legend has it that coffee was discovered by a 9th century Ethiopian goat herder after his goats ate berries from a certain bush and became so spirited they didn’t want to sleep at night. Whatever the actual origin, coffee has been enlivening spirits and keeping people up at night for over a thousand years. Today, it’s the single most popular beverage in the world. People love it and crave it, despite the fact that a host of health problems are blamed on it, along with negative traits like smoking, stained teeth, and hyperness. New research, however, is finding a more complex picture. The drink, like other natural plants and herbs, appears to have some therapeutic benefits, when consumed in the right way.

Coffee could be the “poster child” for whole, unadulterated food. By itself, caffeine, the chemical stimulant in coffee, can be toxic, a shock to the system. But when consumed in moderation in whole food – coffee, cacao (chocolate), tea – it can be highly beneficial. Decaffinated coffee, however, lacks medicinal benefits and has little nutritional value, though it may play a role in reducing excess caffeine intake. Nature, as usual, knew what She was doing by providing the whole package. Recent studies are revealing that coffee – the right quality and quantity – can protect against a host of conditions, including Parkinson’s Disease, Type 2 Diabetes, liver cancers, Alzheimer’s, etc.

We’re talking about drinking coffee as part of a balanced diet of whole, fresh foods. Coffee should be imbibed in moderation (about 2-3 six oz. cups a day). Organic is important because coffee is one of the most heavily sprayed crops. Buy whole bean (grind it yourself; pre-ground may be rancid by the time you use it); properly dried and roasted, dark roasted is best (if it doesn’t smell pleasant and taste fresh, it’s likely rancid and poor quality). Drink black (added sugar and cream ruin benefits by spiking insulin levels and causing insulin resistance). Read More

Carrot Coconut “Coffee” Cake

  • 1 1/2 cup unsweetened, finely shredded coconut
  • 1/4 cup carrot juice
  • 1/2 – 3/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
  • pinch of ground cloves
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • about 1/8 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
  • 1/2 teaspoon lemon zest
  • 1/2 cup raw walnuts, chopped
  • 2-3 tablespoons maple syrup
  • 3 tablespoons unrefined coconut oil, liquefied
  • pinch seasalt (opt.)
  1. 1. In a medium bowl combine the carrot juice and shredded coconut. Stir until the coconut takes on a bright orange color.
  2. Add the remaining ingredients and stir well to combine.
  3. Press the cake mixture evenly into a loaf or round pan.
  4. Place in the freezer for 2-3 hours to set. (If you have a dehydrator, you can form the batter into cookies and warm for 6-8 hours at 115 degrees.)
  5. Serve at room temperature with, if you’re so inclined, a cup of freshly brewed, organic, black coffee! Leftover cake can be stored in the refrigerator, or freezer for longer storage.

Rhubarb

Rhubarb is a species of plant in the family Polygonaceae. They are herbaceous perennials growing from short, thick rhizomes. They have large leaves that are somewhat triangular, with long fleshy petioles. They have small flowers grouped in large compound leafy greenish-white to rose-red inflorescences.

Most commonly, rhubarb’s leaf stalks are cooked with sugar and used in pies and other desserts. A number of varieties have been domesticated for human consumption, most of which are recognized as Rheum x hybridum by the Royal Horticultural Society.

Rhubarb is usually considered to be a vegetable; however, in the United States, a New York court decided in 1947 that since it was used in the United States as a fruit, it was to be counted as a fruit for the purposes of regulations and duties. A side effect was a reduction on imported rhubarb tariffs, as tariffs were higher for vegetables than fruits.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Rhubarb can be used as a strong laxative. Its roots have been used as a laxative for at least 5,000 years.

The roots and stems are rich in anthraquinones, such as emodin and rhein. These substances are cathartic and laxative, which explains the sporadic use of rhubarb as a dieting aid. These molecules also contain sugars attached to them and are hence glycosides. Glycosides can retain water more thus adding to the cathartic action.

Rhubarb roots are used in traditional Chinese medicine; rhubarb also appears in medieval Arabic and European prescriptions.

The rhizomes (’roots’) contain stilbenoid compounds (including rhaponticin), which has shown to lower blood glucose levels in diabetic mice.

NUTRIENTS (per 100 grams)

Carbohydrates 4.54 g

Sugars 1.1 g

Dietary fibre 1.8 g

Fat 0.2 g

Protein 0.9 g

Water 93.61 g

Folate 7 μg

Vitamin C 8 mg

Vitamin E 0.27 mg

Vitamin K 29.3 μg

Calcium 86 mg

Iron 0.22 mg

Potassium 288 mg

Sodium 4 mg

Zinc 0.1 mg


Orange

April 8, 2013

The citrus fruit is one of the oldest fruits known in the history of cultivation. As early as 500 B.C. the fruit of the citrus tree was mentioned in a collection of old documents believed to be edited by Confucius himself. In the year A.D. 1178, Han Yen-Chi, a Chinese horticulturist, wrote on the subject of oranges, and the seedless orange was mentioned in these writings. This author speaks of twenty-seven varieties of “very valuable and precious” oranges.

Oranges were originally brought from China to India, and gradually spread over the entire world where the climate was mild enough for their cultivation. The sour orange, or “Naranga,” as it was referred to in Sanskrit about A.D. 100. came into cultivation in the basin of the Mediterranean long before the fall of the Roman Empire. The sweet variety, or “Airavata”, does not appear to have been cultivated until early in the fifteenth century, and then became so popular that it was soon being cultivated extensively throughout Southern Europe. The Moors brought the Seville orange from the East.

Wild oranges were found in the West Indies and Brazil as early as1600. The early Spanish explorers are believed to have brought oranges with them to this country in the time of Ponce de Leon’s quest for the Fountain of Youth. In California, the orange was cultivated at the San Diego Mission in 1769 and, in the year 1804, 400 seedlings grew into a grove of considerable size around the San Gabriel Mission. The popularity of the orange, particularly in the favorable climate of California, grew rapidly, until it soon developed into a leading industry. The orange became known as “California’s liquid sunshine.”

The original orange was very small, bitter, and full of seeds, but through constant efforts in cross-fertilization and selection, many varieties of this delicious fruit are now cultivated with a tremendous improvement in the quality of the fruit. The sweet oranges are, by far, the most popular, while the sour orange is used more for its propagating stock than for its fruit. Unless killed by frost or fire, the orange tree lives to an old age and continues to bear fruit throughout its lifetime.

More than two hundred varieties of oranges are grown in the United States. In 1919 the United States produced only about 25 percent of the world’s total output of oranges, but now it produces about half. Oranges comprise about 60 percent of the citrus fruit grown in the United States.

Oranges are available every day of the year, but are most abundant in the United States from January to May. California, Florida, and Texas are the orange-producing states, and each of these states ships great quantities. California’s vast Valencia orange acreage is now more extensive than the Navel orange plantings. This state now has about 150.000 acres of Valendas, and about 100,000 acres of Navels, with an additional few thousand acres of miscellaneous orange varieties. The largest proportion of the California orange crop-about 85 to 90 percent, comes from southern California.

Choose the first oranges of the season, for they are the richest in mineral values. Tree-ripened oranges have, by far, the greatest mineral content. The best quality orange is firm and heavy, has a fine-textured skin varying in texture according to variety, and is well-colored. The light orange lacks juice. Avoid the soft, flabby, or shriveled orange and those oranges with any soft or moldy areas upon them. Do not eat unripe oranges because they can cause stomach upsets. particularly in small children. Once the skin is cut or broken, the fruit should be eaten immediately as the vitamin C is banned by exposure to the air. If orange juice is kept for a period of time, store in the refrigerator in an airtight container.

The orange is classified as a subtropical fruit and has a citric add content of 1.5 percent. This alkaline-reacting fruit is best eaten with other tropical or subtropical fruits, with add fruits, or with nuts or milk. It is best to avoid eating this fruit with starches or sweets, or with dried fruits.

Use oranges as a dessert fruit, with yogurt, or in combination salads. Make a cup of a segmented orange the thick-skinned seedless orange is best for segmenting-and nil with cottage cheese. Make liquefied drinks, mixing orange juice with other subtropical or tropical fruits such as cactus fruits,loquats, mango, papaya, persimmon, pineapple, pomegranate, apples, and citrus fruits. Many have advised eating oranges or drinking orange juice with meals, early in the morning on an empty stomach, or directly following a meal if the body is in a highly add condition.

The orange is one of the best sources of water-soluble vitamin C. The absence or insufficiency of this causes scurvy. As vitamin C is the least stable of all the vitamins, storage of orange juice at low temperature destroys the vitamin to some extent, and sterilization may destroy it completely. Generally, I think it is best to use the citric add fruits in sections rather than in juices. When the orange is eaten in sections, the mineral material found in the pulp will help to neutralize the citric add effect as it goes into the body.

Citrus fruits are high in sodium, but only when completely matured in the sunshine. The fruit acids from green or immature fruit cause many adverse body reactions.

If the section and bulk of the orange is fresh and sweet, it is an excellent food for children as a supplement for those who must drink cow’s milk, or any milk, because it seems to help in the retention of calcium in the body. Ripe oranges contain as much as 10 percent fruit sugar, which can be immediately assimilated by the body.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Oranges are the most popular source of Vitamin C. They are excellent for treating over acid body conditions, constipation, or a particularly sluggish intestinal tract. In cases of acidosis, drink orange juice, or eat oranges after meals. If the intestinal tract is not functioning properly, drink a large glass of orange juice upon wakening in the morning, or about one-half hour before breakfast. In the cases of stomach acid deficiency, start the meal with a peeled orange or a glass of orange juice.

Those who suffer from tooth decay or poor gums are probably lacking in vitamin C and should drink large amounts of orange juice for a period of a few weeks. People with gastric and duodenal ulcers are deficient in ascorbic acid, and their diet should be supplemented with a high potency vitamin C such as that found in fresh oranges and orange juice.

Orange are very good for elimination. They stir up the acid accumulations and catarrhal settlements in the body very quickly. However, sometimes this is not a good idea if the channels of elimination, such as skin and kidneys, are not able to take out these acids fast enough.

Eat the whole orange, excluding the very outer skin, to get all the good from the fruit. The luscious orange is rated tops in importance in the contribution to health.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 164

Protein: 2.9g

Fat: 0.7 g

Carbohydrates: 36.6 g

Calcium: 108 mg

Phosphorus: 75 mg

Iron: 1.3 mg

Vitamin A: 9101 I.U.

Thiamine: .25mg

Riboflavin: .08 mg

Niacin: .08 mg

Ascorbic acid: 162 mg

Carrot

April 1, 2013

The carrot has been native to Europe since ancient times, and was introduced to the United States during the period of early colonization. Carrots soon became a staple garden crop. Today, they are one of the major truck and garden vegetables.

Depending on the variety, carrots grow to maturity and are ready for market within 70 to 120 days. They are always in season, and are produced in nearly all states. The largest carrot producers are Texas, Florida, and New York. Carrots are so easy to raise that a garden in your backyard in can yield carrots that are rich in vitamins and high in mineral content.

When purchasing carrots, look for firm, smooth, well-shaped carrots of good color and fresh appearance. The tops should be fresh and green, unless they have been damaged in transit from grower to market. Carrots with excessively thick masses of leaf stems at the point of attachment arc usually undesirable because they have large cores and may be woody. Look for carrots with “eye appeal.”

Carrots may be utilized in the diet in many ways. The best way is to eat them raw and as fresh as possible. Raw cam sticks and curls are attractive garnishes and appetizers. Grated carrot, steamed in a stainless steel kettle or baked in the oven and served with parsley and butter, is a nice dish. The bright color of carrots makes them appealing and appetizing to serve with dinner, in salads, with other vegetables, or with cottage cheese or apples and nuts.

Carrot tops are full of potassium, but because of this they are so bitter that the average person does not enjoy them. However, a small portion of the tops may be cut fine and put into mixed salads, or a bunch may be tied with string and cooked in broths or soups for flavoring and for their high mineral content. Lift them out before saving.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Because the carrot is so high in vitamin A, it has been used extensively in the diet to improve the eyesight. Carrots were used in World War II in aerial training schools to improve the eyesight of the students.

Many children have lower jaws that are underdeveloped. This deformity is usually the result of calcium deficiency in the child’s early growth. Babies do not always get enough calcium and some do not have enough raw food or other chewing foods that help promote normal growth of bones and teeth. It is good for a child to have a raw carrot with each meal. I have seen the teeth of children straighten out and the lower jaw develop in a year, when they were given a carrot to chew on before each meal.

Carrots contain a great deal of roughage. They will help in an cases of constipation.

Used as a general bodybuilder, carrot juice is excellent. This juice is presently used in cases of severe illness, and as a foundation in cancer diets. It is delicious and nutritious when combined with other juices such as parsley, celery, watercress, endive, or romaine lettuce.

Everyone can benefit from drinking fresh vegetable juice, and carrot juice one of the best. Some juice vendors believe that die short, stubby carrot is the most flavorful and colorful, and contains more vitamins and minerals. However, the long, deader carrot can be high in these values, too, and is also used.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 179

Protein: 4.8 g

Fat: 1.2 g

Carbohydrates: 37.2 g

Calcium: 156 mg

Phosphorus: 148 mg

Iron: 3.2 mg

Vitamin A: 48,000 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.27 mg

Riboflavin: 0.26 mg

Niacin: 2 mg

Ascorbic acid: 24 mg

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