Foundation for Advancement in Cancer Therapy

Non-Traditional Approaches to
the Theories, Treatments and Prevention of Cancer

Blackberry

August 26, 2013

Blackberries are native to both North America and Europe, but cultivation of this fruit is largely limited to North America. In the early days of the United States, when land was cleared for pasture, blackberry bushes began to multiply. There are many hybrids of blackberries, and both man and nature have had a hand in this process. By 1850, cultivated blackberries had become very popular. Blackberries are now cultivated in almost every part of the United States. Texas and Oregon probably have the largest numbers of acres planted with blackberries. Cultivation of this berry has been slow, because wild berries grow in abundance all over the country. The summer months are the peak season for blackberries.

A quality berry is solid and plump, appears bright and fresh, and is a full black or blue color. Do not choose berries that are partly green or off-color, because the flavor will not be good.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Blackberries are high in iron, but can cause constipation. They have been used for years to control diarrhea. If blackberry juice is mixed with cherry or prune juice, the constipating effect will be taken away. If one can take blackberry juice without constipating results, it is one of the finest builders of the blood.

Much like spinach, raisins, apples, plums and grapes, blackberries are rich in bioflavonoids and Vitamin C, but other nutritional benefits include a very low sodium count and having only 62 calories to a cup. The dark blue colour ensures blackberries have one of the highest antioxidant levels of all fruits. Antioxidants, well-known for lowering the risk of a number of cancers, are a huge bonus, but be aware the berries are best consumed in their natural state to get the full benefits.

The berries are known by a variety of names, which include brambleberries, bramble, dewberry, thimbleberry and lawers. Consumption of blackberries can help to promote the healthy tightening of tissue, which is a great non-surgical procedure to make skin look younger. Prolonged consumption also helps keeps your brain alert, thereby maintaining clarity of thought and good memory. The high tannin content of blackberries provides a number of benefits to reduce intestinal inflammation, alleviate hemorrhoids and soothe the effects of diarrhea.

Traditionally, the leaves and barks of the plant have also been consumed. The leaves of blackberries have been used to treat mild inflammation of the gums and sometimes even sore throats. The astringent tannins are effective in oral hygiene when used as a gargle or mouthwash. The leaves can also be used in a refreshing cup of tea or enhanced as a therapeutic drink. Not everyone will like the flavor, so to mask the bitter taste, honey or another form of sweetener may be added. The healthy dose of Vitamin K aids in muscle relaxing, so some women use the berries to alleviate labor pains. As part of a regular diet, the juice can also be used to regulate menstruation as it is very effective in helping blood to clot.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 294

Protein: 5.4 g

Fat: 3.6 g

Carbohydrates: 59.9 g

Calcium: 163 mg

Phosphorus: 154 mg

Iron: 4.1 mg

Vitamin A: 1,460 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.12 mg

Riboflavin: 0.03 mg

Niacin: 1.3 mg

Ascorbic acid: 106 mg

Turnip and Turnip Greens

August 19, 2013

The turnip, which belongs to the mustard family, is reported to have come from Russia, Siberia, and the Scandinavian peninsula. It has been used since ancient times. Columella wrote in A.D. 42 that two varieties of turnips were grown in what is now known as France. Pliny refers to five varieties, and stated that the broad-bot­tom flat turnip and the globular turnip were the most popular.

Back in the sixteenth century, giant turnips created comment. In 1558, Matthiolus spoke of having heard of long purple turnips weighing thirty pounds: however, this may be considered small compared with the turnip weighing one hundred pounds grown in California in 1850.

Cartier sowed turnip seed in Canada as early as 1540, and they were cultivated in Virginia in 1609, and in Massachusetts as early as 1629. In 1707 they were plentiful around Philadelphia, and their use was recorded in South Carolina as early as 1779.

Turnips may be served steamed, with drawn butter or cream sauce. They are also excellent raw and shredded in salads.

Turnip greens are excellent cooked the same way spinach is usually cooked. The greens should be cooked in a covered pan until tender, using only the water that clings to the leaves.

Regardless of variety, turnips have much the same flavor if grown under the same conditions. They may be distinguished by shape, as round, flat, or top-shaped, and also by color of the flesh­ white or yellow-by the color of the skin, and by the leaves. Vari­eties like Seven Top and Shogoin are grown almost exclusively for the leaves.

The most popular variety is the Purple Top White Globe. This variety has a large globe-shaped root, with an irregularly marked purple cap, and its flesh is white, sweet, crisp, and tender. The leaves are dark green, large, and erect.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Turnips are very high in sulfur and are sometimes gas forming. The root vegetable can be considered a carbohydrate vegetable. If eaten raw, they have a high content of vitamin C. Turnip juice is espe­cially good for any mucous and catarrhal conditions. They have been used successfully in all bronchial disturbances, even asthma. Turnip packs over the chest are good for relieving bronchial disor­ders and packs over the throat are good for sore throats. When fresh and young, turnips can be used raw in salads. They leave an alkaline ash, and have a low calorie content and low carbohydrate content. They can be used in most diets.

Turnip leaves are considered good for controlling calcium in the body, as are all other greens. They have been used successfully in the South to combat pellagra, which is a disease caused by lack of calcium in the body.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (root vegetable)

Calories: 117

Protein: 3.9 g

Fat: .8 g

Carbohydrates: 25.7 g

Calcium: 152 mg

Phosphorus: 117 mg

Iron: 2 mg

Vitamin A: trace I.U.

Thiamine: .16 mg

Riboflavin: .26 mg

Niacin: 2.2 mg

Ascorbic Acid: 140 mg

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (turnip greens only)

Calories: 140

Protein: 11 g

Fat: .1.5 g

Carbohydrates: 20.6 g

Calcium: 987 mg

Phosphorus: 190 mg

Iron: 9.1 mg

Vitamin A: 34,470 I.U.

Thiamine: .37 mg

Riboflavin: 2.15 mg

Niacin: 2.9 mg

Ascorbic Acid: 519 mg

Okra

August 12, 2013

Okra is native to tropical Africa, where it has been cultivated for many centuries. It is now widely grown in warm regions. For many years it has held an important place among the garden vegetables of the southern states.

The young and tender seed pods of okra are used to give a pleasant flavor and provide thickening for soups and stews. In Louisiana, okra is used in Creole cookers and is the “gumbo” used in many dishes. It is excellent also as a boiled vegetable. Just wash it, boil about ten minutes in salted water until tender, drain, and serve with butter or lemon butter. Okra and tomatoes make a fine combination. Raw sliced okra is good in salads. Okra should preferably be cooked in stainless steel, agate, porcelain, earthenware, or glass utensils. Copper, brass, iron, or tin will cause the okra to discolor, turn black, and look unappetizing.

Okra is a soft-stemmed annual of the mallow family and is closely related to the shrubby althea. It grows three to five feet high, and bears yellow flowers which are followed by fruiting capsules or seed pods.

There are three general types of okra: tall green, dwarf green, and ladyfinger. Each of these in again divided according to length and color of the pods. Varieties in most common use are known to the seed trade as Perkins Mammoth, Long Green, Dwarf Green, and White Velvet. Clemson Spineless is of the same type as Perkins Mammoth Podded but has spineless pods and somewhat sparse foliage, making it less troublesome to harvest than other varieties.

Young, tender, fresh, clean pods of small to medium size usually are of good quality. Pods should snap or puncture easily. Pods that have passed their prime look dull and dry. They are usually woody, and the seeds are hard. If held too long, they are likely to become shriveled and discolored, and lack flavor.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

The sodium content of okra is very high. It also contains a vegetable mucin that is soothing to the irritated membranes of the intestinal tract. Okra has an alkaline reaction.

Okra is made into tablets, and they are valuable in replenishing a sodium deficiency in the body and in replacing sodium lost through excessive perspiration. The tablets are also good for ulcers of the stomach.

This low-calorie vegetable helps keep the joints limber. Okra powder is very good to include in broths and soups. Because it contains a high amount of sodium, it is good for elderly people.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 140

Protein: 9.4 g

Fat: 0.8 g

Carbohydrates: 29.6 g

Calcium: 328 mg

Phosphorus: 199 mg

Iron: 2.8 mg

Vitamin A: 2030 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.49 mg

Riboflavin: 0.42 mg

Niacin: 2.8 mg

Ascorbic acid: 121 mg

Persimmon

August 5, 2013

For centuries Japan and China have been growing the Oriental or Japanese persimmon. It is probably native to China, since it was introduced to Japan from that country. The Japanese consider it their national fruit but it is more properly called Oriental rather than Japanese persimmon, since it is not native to Japan. Commodore Perry’s expedition, which opened Japan to world commerce in 1852, is credited with the introduction of this fruit to the United States.

The persimmon that is native to the United States grows wild in the East from Connecticut to Florida, and in the West from Texas to Kansas. This persimmon is much smaller than the Oriental, but has richer flesh. The wild fruit grows in sufficient abundance to satisfy local demand, and little or no shipping is done.

In general, persimmons that have dark-colored flesh are always sweet and nonastringent and may be eaten before they become too soft. Varieties with light-colored flesh, with the exception of the Fuyu variety, are astringent until they soften. The astringency is due to the presence of a large amount of tannin, the same substance found in tea. As the fruit ripens and sweetens the tannin disappears. Ripening can take place just as well off the tree as on.

The Japanese remove the “pucker” from persimmons by placing them in casks that have been used for sake, or Japanese liquor. Allowing persimmons to sweeten naturally will remove the “pucker,” or tannin.

The season for persimmons is October through December, and the peak month is November. Almost all commercial shipments originate in California. The Hachiya is the largest and handsomest oriental variety grown in this country. As a rule, California produces a seedless variety, but the Hachiya grown in Florida has one or more seeds. The Hachiya fruit is cone-shaped and terminates in a black point. The skin is a glossy, deep, orange-red and the flesh is deep yellow, astringent until soft, but sweet and rich when ripe. The Tanenashi is the more important variety in the southeastern states. There are many other varieties that are grown commercially.

Good quality fruit is well-shaped, plump, smooth, and highly colored. The skin is unbroken and the stem cap is attached. Ripeness is usually indicated by softness.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

When thoroughly ripe, persimmons are a rich source of fruit sugar. Dried persimmons are almost as sweet as candy. They are rich in potassium, magnesium, and phosphorus, and are good to use in a soft diet.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 286

Protein: 2.6 g

Fat: 1.8 g

Carbohydrates: 73 g

Calcium: 26 mg

Phosphorus: 97 mg

Iron: 1.3 mg

Vitamin A: 10,080 I.U.

Thiamine: .11 mg

Riboflavin: .08 mg

Niacin: .4 mg

Ascorbic acid: 48 mg

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