Foundation for Advancement in Cancer Therapy

Non-Traditional Approaches to
the Theories, Treatments and Prevention of Cancer

Dates

March 31, 2014

One food which dates back in prehistoric times is the date. Here is truly a miracle food which has nourished, sustained and probably imparted life to countless travelers over the sands of time.

While the date is ripened on the tree, the sugar it contains increases until it is completely ripe. At that time, the natural sugar supply could be as much as 75% of the whole food. Those who find they have a “sweet tooth” would be wise to eat some dates when they finish a meal. It’s far healthier than commercial sweets or white sugar products.

M.C. Hetzell, writing about the date in Life and Health, national medical journal, (Vol. 71, No.12) explains that, “Of all fruit-bearing trees the date palm is most unique. For example, there are female date palms and male date palms. Yet, unlike other plants of this type, the flowers of the female are not pollinated via the ambitious migrations of bees or other insects Nor do the gentle breezes perform any expert service on behalf of Mother Nature. It remains for man to clamber aloft among the spiny leaves and shake the pollen from the male blossoms amid the blooms of the female. This service has been so performed for nearly 400 years!”

Because the date palm does not require any pollination, and because it is so self-sufficient, it may be regarded as the healthiest tree in the world! It just cannot be spoiled by improper pollination.

Once the dates are picked, they must be properly ripened. M.C. Hetzel explains, “Today dates are ripened in what are called maturation rooms, which are maintained at uniform temperature and humidity. Aiding also in the even development of the fruit is the brown-bag treatment. One who visits groves in the fall of the year, when the dates are maturing, may be amazed at the sight of what appears to be numerous bottomless brown sacks suspended from stately palms. Wrapped around the great clusters of dates, they repel the birds, who evidently suffer from sweet tooth. They encourage insect visitation. They perform the much needed service of an umbrella in case of rain.”

Dates are picked individually when they ripen. They are ready to be picked when they reach the “khalal stage” which is when they turn from intense red or yellow to the golden or brown hue. Such meticulous care means that the dates you will buy in handy package at the store is rich in natural undisturbed vitamins, minerals and other nutrients.

Originally, dates were grown only in the deserts of the ancient lands of Arabia and the country of the camel and the nomad tribes. So hardy were these dates and so filled with nutritional qualities, that they were the chief food grown at all oasis—caravans would take huge sacks of dates with them—without these dates their prime source of nourishment—it is doubtful they could have survived weeks and weeks of difficult travel. Dates are one of the few foods which thrive in various climates and are not affected by adverse conditions.

At the turn of the 19th century, Dr. T Swingle, a youthful researcher at the Bureau of Plant Industry of the Department of Agriculture, decided to help start America’s date industry. He obtained date tree offshoots or suckers from North Africa and planted them in various parts of the United States. One area was especially favorable—the sun drenched Imperial valleys of California which was excellent soil and ardent climate. The young date trees flourished and matured and produced delicious dates, earning this part of the country the title of the “date growing kingdom” of America. Here, the desert warmth provides the proper climate for date growing irrigation, offer sufficient water—at the base of the palm—and the result is a package of delicious, nutritious dates.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE CUP (100g)

Calories: 66

Protein:: .4g

Fat: ..0g

Carbohydrates: 18g

Calcium: 64mg

Phosphorus: 62mg

Iron: .90mg

Vitamin A: 149 I.U.

Thiamine: .05mg

Riboflavin: .06mg

Niacin: 1.6mg

Ascorbic Acid: 0mg

Rethinking Cancer Newsletter #45

March 26, 2014

Filed under: Rethinking Cancer Newsletters — ggrieser @ 12:26 pm

Welcome to another year in the 21st Century! We live in advanced technological times, full of amazing developments that are giving us more conveniences, more ways of connecting. “Advancements” in our industrial food production, however, appear to be heading in a more ominous direction:

  • Modern agricultural practices, dependent on massive use of toxic chemicals, are taking a heavy toll on soil and environmental health and dramatically altering the entire food chain.
  • Virtually all beef sold in American grocery stores comes from cattle fed corn and soy instead of grass, their natural food source, and injected with hormones and antibiotics that can adversely affect human health.
  • About half the world’s seafood now comes from fish farms. Wild fish eat other fish, but farmed fish can be fed a concoction of soy protein and beef or chicken byproducts, including cattle blood, bone, and chicken feathers
  • The business of genetically-modified organisms (GMO) is booming, including the soon expected to be approved apple that never turns brown and “Agent Orange” corn and soybeans, designed to tolerate the toxic herbicide 2,4-D, associated with cancer, Parkinson’s, endocrine disruption, birth defects, and other serious health and reproductive problems.

Let’s dedicate this year to supporting sustainable food practices, especially local farms, greenmarkets and artisanal products. Let’s also take the time to tell our elected representatives how we feel! To get started, take a look at this videoFood: A Project Envision Documentary. Let’s make these truly advanced times!

To your health!
Foundation for Advancement in Cancer Therapy (FACT™)

P.S. 2014 marks FACT’s 43rd year — thanks to all your continued support! Check out our new Product Guide and do keep in touch on TwitterFacebook and our YouTube channel!

What Gets Your Up in the Morning?
by Tony Schwartz

In the last several weeks, I had two radically different experiences spending extended time with leaders at two large, global companies. A long, alcohol-fueled dinner with the first group was a pure downer: dull, rote and devoid of positive energy.

The day with the second — a group of young managers at Google — was utterly exhilarating. After eight hours together, discussing what it takes to be an inspiring leader, the conversation was still going strong.

What accounts for the difference? Read More

Which Potato Would You Eat?
A Third-Grader’s Experiment

So it’s a little staged. And the delivery a bit stilted. But the message comes through loud and clear: If your potatoes aren’t organic, they’ve been sprayed with chlorpropham . . . a toxic chemical that doesn’t just sit on the vegetable’s skin, but permeates the entire potato. Chronic exposure of laboratory animals to chlorpropham has caused “retarded growth, increased liver, kidney and spleen weights, congestion of the spleen, and death.” And it’s toxic to honeybees. Watch the Video

Source: Organic Consumers Association

Why the War on Raw Milk?

Raw (unpasteurized/unhomogenized) milk has been a staple of healthy nomadic and agricultural societies going back as far as 9,000 years. Today, in Europe and many other countries raw milk products are readily available and highly valued for their life-sustaining properties. Yet in the US, the sale of raw dairy is banned or severely limited in most of the 50 states. It is not unusual for merely suspected violators to be raided by gun-toting government teams in the dead of night, severely charged and, far too often, financially ruined.

What is going on? Read More

Bonny Clabber

Bonny clabber is a traditional cultured dairy food in both the Southern United States and in Scotland. In the U.S., it was customarily eaten with molasses, cinnamon and nutmeg for breakfast. Bonny clabber is a wild-cultured dairy food in that it requires no starter; rather, its probiotic properties stem directly from the natural flora in the milk and in your home. In that respect, it’s similar to a wild sourdough.

Preparation is simple:

  1. Take 3-4 cups raw milk*, a week or two old is best.
  2. Place the milk in a clean jar with a loose fitting lid (or you can use a towel and rubber band).
  3. Place in a cabinet or warmish spot for 3-4 days (less time in warmer weather).
  4. When you can tilt the jar to the side and it stays in one cohesive shape your clabber is finished. 
  5. The longer you ferment, the more it will separate. The more it separates, the easier it is to strain. Strained clabber has a texture closer to clotted cream or Greek yogurt.

Voila! Easier than pie! Clabbered milk can be used in any recipe that calls for yogurt, buttermilk or kefir. It’s quite sour, but delicious and very nutritious. Children love it, especially with fruit or some natural sweetener.

*To find a reputable raw dairy source near you, visit RealMilk.com

Endive and Escarole

March 24, 2014

Native to the East Indies, endive and escarole were introduced into Egypt and Greece at a very early period and references to them appear in history. The plants were brought to America by colonists. Endive is closely related botanically to chicory and the two names are sometimes incorrectly used as synonyms. Escarole is another name for a type of endive with broad leaves and a well-blanched heart. The word “endive” is used to designate plants with narrow, finely divided, curly leaves. These greens are used raw in salad, or may be cooked like spinach. The slightly bitter flavor adds zest to a mixed salad.

Crispness, freshness, and tenderness are essential factors of quality. Wilted plants, especially those that have brown leaves, are undesirable, as are plants with tough, coarse leaves. Such leaves will be excessively bitter. Tenderness can be determined by breaking or twisting a leaf. In the unblanched condition leaves should be green, but when blanched, center leaves should be creamy white or yellowish white.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Escarole and endive are very high in vitamin A, and work very well in ridding the body of infections. They are both high in iron and potassium and are alkaline in reaction. Escarole and endive are both useful as an appetite stimulant because of their bitter ingredients. Escarole also helps to activate the bile. They are best when used raw.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (both escarole and endive)

Calories: 80

Protein: 6.8g

Fat: .4g

Carbohydrates: 16.4g

Calcium: 323mg

Phosphorus: 216mg

Iron: 6.8mg

Vitamin A: 13,170 I.U.

Thiamine: .27mg

Riboflavin: .56mg

Niacin: 2mg

Ascorbic Acid: 42mg

Cabbage

March 17, 2014

Cabbage was widely grown in ancient China. In fact, the workers on the Great Wall so many years ago were fed on cabbage and rice. When winter came, wine was added to the cabbage to preserve it, producing a sour cabbage pleasant to the taste, which didn’t spoil. A thousand years later the Tartars under Genghis Khan conquered China and carried sour cabbage with them as they overran other parts of the world. The vitamin C in cabbage was enough to prevent scurvy, the deficiency disease which killed many soldiers on long marches in ancient times.

When the Tartars came to Eastern Europe they were still eating sour cabbage, but they were preserving it with salt rather than wine. The Russians, Poles and Austrians tasted this food of their conquerors and liked it. The Austrians named it sauerkraut. The Dutch brought cole slaw to America, its name deriving from kool for cabbage and sla for salad: cabbage salad.

Raw cabbage has been known from antiquity as a remedy for drunkenness. Eating cabbage with vinegar before a drinking bout and after a feast would prevent one from feeling too strongly the effects of the wine or beer.

Pliny, the Roman naturalist, thought the best cabbages were those tiny heads that grow on the stalk after the original big head is picked. Gardeners who leave the cabbage stalk in the ground usually find these a few weeks later.

On St. Patrick’s Day a dish of corned beef and cabbage, while delicious, is more American than Irish. The dish is a variation of a traditional Irish meal but because early Irish-Americans were poor, beef was a cheaper alternative to traditional pork, and cabbage happened to be a springtime vegetable.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Down through the centuries cabbage has been used for just about every purpose industrious herb doctors could experiment with: chronic coughs, colic, constipation, dysentery, toothache, gout, pains in the liver, deafness, insomnia and many other ailments. Contrarily, some writers on herb medicines declared that cabbage should be avoided because of its tendency to cause flatulence.

Today we know that long cooking produces the sulfur compounds which, in the past, gave cabbage its bad name. Heat, soaking in water or cooking for too long a time break down the sulfur compounds and create the digestive problems some people have with cabbage. Serve cabbage raw if you would get the most out of it, nutritionally speaking. If you must cook it, make it brief—no more than a few minutes in a tiny bit of water. Shred or chop it finely before cooking, so that this short cooking time will be enough.

Cabbage is one of our best sources of vitamin C—raw, it may contain up to 50 milligrams per serving. It also contains considerable potassium and vitamin A. One half cup contains only 10 calories, so it is an excellent “filler” food for the calorie-counter. A dressing of lemon juice or vinegar adds almost no calories. Mayonnaise or other oily salad dressing is suitable if you are counting carbohydrate units rather than calories. When you shred cabbage for slaw for cooking, prepare it as soon as possible before eating. It loses vitamin C with every additional moment it stands before eating. Keep the cabbage head in the refrigerator and, if you don’t use it all at one meal, cover the cut side with waxed paper or foil to keep out all air.

NUTRITIONAL VALUE

Calories: 22

Protein: 1.1 g

Fat: 0.1 g

Carbohydrates: 5.2 g

Calcium: 35.6 mg

Phosphorus: 23.1 mg

Iron: .4 mg

Vitamin A: 87.2 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.1 mg

Riboflavin: 0.1 mg

Niacin: 0.2 mg

Lettuce

March 10, 2014

Lettuce is one of the oldest vegetables and probably originated in India or Central Asia. According to the writings or Herodotus, lettuce was served to the Persian kings as far back as the sixth century BC. It was a popular Roman food at about the beginning of the Christian era, and in the first century AD a dozen distinctively different varieties were described by Roman writers of the era. There is also evidence that lettuce was grown in China in the fifth century AD.

Columbus may have carried lettuce seeds to the New World, for it was being cultivated in the Bahamas in 1494. It was a common vegetable in Haiti as early as 1565, and Brazil was reported to have cultivated before 1650. The early colonists evidently introduced lettuce into the US, and in 1806 16 varieties were reported growing in American gardens.

Both the English and Latin words for lettuce are based on the heavy, milky juice of the vegetable, which is characteristic of the lettuce family. The primitive forms of lettuce has long stems and large leafs grew at the end of these stems. These closed-packed lettuce heads were well developed in Europe by the 16th century, while the loose common head type of developed later.

Lettuce has become the most valuable truck crop, and 85% of the commercial crop is produced in the west-California, Arizona, Colorado, Washington, Oregon, and Idaho. The northeast and south Atlantic states are also important lettuce growing regions.

Lettuce is available all year, and the peak months are May, June, and July. Although the crisp head and butter head types are the most important from a commercial standpoint, the Cos or Romaine type are bets from a health standpoint, as the sun is allowed to penetrate each leaf. The leaves generally have less of the bitterness that is characteristic of some types of head lettuce. The “leaf” or the “bunching” type of lettuce is distinguished by loose leaves that do not form a head. This type is best for home gardening, as it can be grown in areas where the temperature is too high for successful growing of the other types of lettuce. The stem type lettuce has an enlarged stem and no head. The leaves are not as palpable as the other types of lettuce leaves except when young and tender. The stems are pulled and eaten raw or cooked.

Lettuce of good quality should be fresh, crisp, and tender, and if in head lettuce form, the head should be fairly firm to hard. Lettuce with a well developed seed stem has a bitter flavor.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Leaf lettuce is much richer in iron than head lettuce. We do not advocate using head lettuce in the diet, for it contains little nourishment. It contains significantly lower amounts of vitamins A and C than green Romaine lettuce. The darker green outside leaves contain a much higher proportion of the valuable food elements than the light colored inner leaves. Head lettuce is very gas forming , and really only offers bulk to the intestinal tract. It has an alkaline ash, however, and is not stimulating. Also, it is excellent for those who would like to lose weight. It also has many sleep promoting elements and makes good lettuce juice, which help promote sleep. It tends to slow down the digestive effect of the intestinal tract.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (head lettuce)

Calories: 57

Protein: 3.8 g

Fat: 0.6 g

Carbohydrates: 0.1 g

Calcium: 86 mg

Phosphorus: 78 mg

Iron: 1.6 mg

Vitamin A: 1,710 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.20 mg

Riboflavin: 0.21 mg

Niacin: 0.5 mg

Ascorbic acid: 24 mg

Pineapple

March 3, 2014

Pineapples were cultivated in the West Indies long before Columbus visited there. But after his voyage to the island of Guadeloupe, it was recorded in Spain that Columbus had “discovered” the fruit. The pineapple is native to tropical America and was known to the Indians as na-na, meaning fragrance, and to the Spanish explorers as piiia, because of its resemblance to a pine cone.

History does not record how pineapples first reached Hawaii. For many years they grew wild. Then, a young Bostonian started commercial production of them there in 1901 on twelve acres of land. His company has enlarged to the present 25,000 acres. The plant of this fruit grows from two to four feet high, with a rosette of stiff, sword-shaped leaves growing from its base. Out of the rosette center grows a single, fleshy, scaly-coated fruit that is four to ten inches long. A cluster of sword-shaped leaves surmounts the fruit.

Pineapples are grown in many parts of the world, but the United States is supplied principally from Cuba, Mexico, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico. They may be obtained all year long, but are most abundant from March through July. The peak months are June and July.

A ripe pineapple in quality condition has a fresh, clean appearance, a distinctive darkish orange-yellow color, and a decided fragrance. The “eyes” of the fruit are flat and almost hollow. If the fruit is mature it is usually heavier in proportion to its size. To test for ripeness, pull at the spikes. If they pull out easily, the fruit is ripe; discolored areas, or soft spots, are an indication of bruised fruit.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

High in vitamin C, the pineapple is considered to be a protective fruit. It is wonderful for constipation and poor digestion. The pineapple helps digest proteins, and can be used in elimination diets. It leaves an alkaline ash in the body. Pineapple is thought to have a certain amount of iodine because it grows near the ocean. When buying canned pineapple, make sure it is unsweetened. Pineapple goes well with fruit and nuts, and is good to eat on a fruit diet.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories 123

Protein 1g

Fat 0.5g

Carbohydrates 33g

Calcium 39mg Niacin 0.5mg

Phosphorus 19mg Ascorbic acid 40mg

Iron 1.2mg

Vitamin A: 170 I.U.

Thiamine 0.20mg

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