Foundation for Advancement in Cancer Therapy

Non-Traditional Approaches to
the Theories, Treatments and Prevention of Cancer

Endive and Escarole

April 27, 2015

Native to the East Indies, endive and escarole were introduced into Egypt and Greece at a very early period and references to them appear in history. The plants were brought to America by colonists. Endive is closely related botanically to chicory and the two names are sometimes incorrectly used as synonyms. Escarole is another name for a type of endive with broad leaves and a well-blanched heart. The word “endive” is used to designate plants with narrow, finely divided, curly leaves. These greens are used raw in salad, or may be cooked like spinach. The slightly bitter flavor adds zest to a mixed salad.

Crispness, freshness, and tenderness are essential factors of quality. Wilted plants, especially those that have brown leaves, are undesirable, as are plants with tough, coarse leaves. Such leaves will be excessively bitter. Tenderness can be determined by breaking or twisting a leaf. In the unblanched condition leaves should be green, but when blanched, center leaves should be creamy white or yellowish white.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Escarole and endive are very high in vitamin A, and work very well in ridding the body of infections. They are both high in iron and potassium and are alkaline in reaction. Escarole and endive are both useful as an appetite stimulant because of their bitter ingredients. Escarole also helps to activate the bile. They are best when used raw.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (both escarole and endive)

Calories: 80

Protein: 6.8g

Fat: .4g

Carbohydrates: 16.4g

Calcium: 323mg

Phosphorus: 216mg

Iron: 6.8mg

Vitamin A: 13,170 I.U.

Thiamine: .27mg

Riboflavin: .56mg

Niacin: 2mg

Ascorbic Acid: 42mg

Celery

April 20, 2015

Celery has long been native to marshy regions extending from Sweden southward to Algeria, Egypt, and Ethiopia. Ancient Oriental people gathered wild celery and brewed it as a medicinal herb for stomach maladies and for a general tonic. Wild celery has a bitter flavor and pungent odor. The early physicians seemed to think that the worse a concoction tasted, the better it was for the patient. The ancient Greeks valued it highly, and awarded celery as a prize to winners in many of their sport contests.

There is mention of a cultivated variety of celery grown in France in 1623, and in 1776 celery seed was sold in England for the growing of plants to be used in flavoring soups and stews. Celery has been grown commercially in the United States since about 1880.

Celery belongs to the same plant family as carrots, parsley, fennel, caraway, and anise. The characteristic flavor of these plants is from the volatile oils found in the stems, leaves, and seeds.

California and Florida are the two leading celery producing states, but celery is also grown in many other states in the eastern and western United States. Celery is available all year, but its peak season is November through May. Study the market in your state and plan to use celery in abundance during the months when celery is in season.

The most desirable celery is of medium length, thickness, and solidity. The stalks should be brittle enough to snap easily. Pithy or stringy celery is not good to eat and probably has less vitamin and mineral content.

The pithiness of a celery stalk can be detected by pressing or twisting the stalk, and stringiness can be detected by breaking the stalk. Celery that has formed a seed stem probably has a poor flavor and may be bitter.

Celery is highly perishable, and should be kept refrigerated. To prepare for eating, scrub and wash thorottghly to be sure all poisonous sprays are removed. Before the tops of celery are used, they should be separated, and washed several times. If you are cooking celery tops, douse. them in water that is slightly warn1 to insure a thorough washing.

If you are cooking celery, steam it only long enough to break down the fibers, or cook it a few minutes in a vessel with a tight lid. Use very little water. Cooked celery takes only about three hours to digest. Celery is also delicious in soup and as a seasoning in almost all cooked food.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Celery is fairly high in roughage and low in calories. Its high water content makes it an especially good food to eat with foods that are more concentrated, particularly heavy starches. It is an alkaline food and should be classified as a protective food. The greener stalks of celery are an especially good source of vitamin A and celery is also a good source of vitamins B1 and G. It is rich in chlorine, sodium, potassium, and magnesium.

As an all-around maintainer of good health, celery juice gets top billing. It is good by itself or mixed with other vegetable juices,and goes best with carrot, carrot and parsley, or apple. Celery can be juiced with fruits, vegetables, or nuts for a complete, easily digested meal.

Celery is generally known as a sodium food, and sodium is what we call the youth maintainer in the body. Sodium helps keep us young and active, and the muscles limber and pliable. Whenever there is a stiffness in the joints and creaking or cracking in the knees, we know we are lacking in sodium. Sodium is the one element that most people lack.

When the tissues, joints, and arteries get hard, there is too much calcium in the body, and a softer element is needed. The element that counteracts calcium best is sodium. It helps keep calcium in solution.

Celery should be eaten often because it is one of the best foods for keeping the body well. It neutralizes acids and is a good blood cleanser. It has protective properties that are beneficial to both the brain and the nervous system. Celery is an excellent food for people suffering from arthritis, neuritis, and rheumatism. It can help to clear up high blood pressure.

Sodium is one of the chemical elements needed so much in the walls of the stomach and in the intestinal tract. Celery is particularly good for these parts of the body. However, many times celery can be very irritating to a sensitive stomach because it contains a great deal of fiber. If irritation results, celery juice should be substituted. It is also best to avoid using raw celery leaves if there is any stomach irritation. Broths made of celery leaves, with other vegetables and milk or cream added, are good. to take for stomach disturbance. The milk or cream has a wonderful soothing effect on the stomach, especially when there is excessive acidity. A broth made with celery and other vegetables is also good in an elimination diet.

Celery aids digestion, counteracts acidosis, halts fermentation, and purifies the bloodstream. Celery juice can be handled and tolerated by most people, especially children. However, many people prefer diluted celery juice, and it is very good when combined with pineapple or apple juice. Apple and celery juice combined is great for neutralizing the rheumatic acids in the body. Combine celery, parsley, and asparagus juice for kidney disorders; celery and papaya juice for asthma; celery and grapefruit juice with a pinch of pure cream of tartar for colds or sinus troubles; celery and parsley juice for fevers, gout, or arthritis; and, if t~e condition of the teeth is poor, combine beet greens, parsley, celery juice, and green kale. It is a non-starchy vegetable.

Celery is best eaten raw, preferably in the form of combination vegetable salads. Use it as a balance in high protein salads such as chicken, tuna, or shrimp. Celery is particularly flavorful when cooked with tomatoes or green peppers. Its pot liquor is especially good as a base in soups and sauces.

The leaves of celery are rich in potassium, sodium, and sulfur. The raw leaves or tops are excellent irt the treatment of diabetes. Because they are so tough, they should be chopped, liquefied, and added to other vegetables to lessen the~ir strong taste. When eaten raw, the leaves are beneficial to the nerves and disorders resulting from nervous conditions. Celery leaves are also good for all acid conditions of the body.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (one pound of celery contains 93 percent water)

Calories: 218

Protein: 1.8 g

Fat: 3.18 g

Carbohydrates: 51.4 g

Calcium: 63.5 mg

Phosphorus: 50 mg

Iron: 2.7 mg

Vitamin A: 182 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.13 mg

Riboflavin: 0.09 mg

Niacin: .45 mg

Ascorbic acid: 55 mg

Onion

April 13, 2015

Onions are believed to have originated in Asia. When the Israeli’s were in the wilderness after being led out of Egypt by Moses, they yearned for onions and other vegetables they were used to eating. Onions were used by the Egyptians as offerings to their gods. They were fed to the workmen who built the pyramids, and Alexander the Great gave onions to his troops to promote their valor.

The odoriferous onion and the dainty lily are members of the same family, Liliaceae. The substance that gives the onion its distinctive odor and flavor is a volatile sulfurous oil which is about half eliminated by boiling. This volatile oil is what causes tears. Holding onions under cold water while peeling them prevents the oil fumes from rising, so use water and spare your handkerchief.

Onions lose approximately 27% of their original ascorbic acid (vitamin C) after five minutes of boiling.

There are two classes of onions—strong and mild. The early grown onions are generally milder in flavor and odor and are preferred for raw use. Each of these two classes can be again categorized into four colors—red, brown, white and yellow. The white onions are the mildest. Each has many varieties.

Onions are also further divided by size for different uses. The smallest size is the pickling onion, also knows as pearl or button onion, and is not more than one inch thick. The next size is the boiling onion, which is usually an inch to two inches in diameter. The next larger size is preferred for chopping or grating. The very large Spanish or Bermuda onions are mild and sweet and good for slicing. They average two and one-half to two and three-quarters inches in diameter. In the trade, the term Valencia is used to mean Spanish-type yellow onions. The globe and flat-type yellow onions are generally referred to as yellows, and white onions of the globe and semi-globe types are generally referred to as whites.

Texas is the main early spring producer; California and Texas the main late spring states; California and New Jersey the most important early summer producers; and New York, Michigan, Minnesota, Colorado, California, Idaho, and Oregon the principal late summer states.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Onions are one of the earliest known food medicines, and were used for hundreds of years for colds and catarrhal disorders and to drive fermentations and impurities out of the system. The liquid from a raw onion that has been chopped up fine, covered with honey, and left standing for four or five hours, makes an excellent cough syrup. It is wonderful for soothing an inflamed throat. Onion packs on the chest have been used for years in bronchial inflammations.

Onions contain a large amount of sulfur and are especially good for the liver. As a sulfur food, they mix best with proteins, as they stimulate the action of the amino acids to the brain and nervous system. Whenever onions are eaten, it is a good idea to use greens with them. Parsley especially helps neutralize the effects of the onion sulfur in the intestinal tract.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 157

Protein: 6 g

Fat: 0.4 g

Carbohydrates: 36 g

Calcium: 111 mg

Phosphorus: 149 mg

Iron: 2.1 mg

Vitamin A: 160 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.15 mg

Riboflavin: 0.10 mg

Niacin: 0.6 mg

Ascorbic acid: 38 mg

Pea

April 6, 2015

Evidence shows that the pea has been around since prehistoric times. Although the pea is of uncertain origin, it is probably native to Central Europe or Central Asia. It is also probable that peas were brought from Greece or Italy by the Aryans 2,000 years before Christ.

The green pea is a natural soluble mixture of starch and protein. Fresh peas are alkaline-forming, while dried peas have a tendency to produce allergic reactions and to cause gas, particularly when eaten with too much protein or concentrated starch. The best quality pea is one that is young, fresh, tender, and sweet. Use fresh, young peas in order to obtain the greatest food value and flavor. The pod should be velvety soft to the touch, fresh in appearance, and bright green in color. The pods should be well filled and the peas well developed, but not bulging. The large ripe pea is really a seed and should not be considered a vegetable.

The real “sugar” pea is grown primarily in Europe and is little known in the United States. Because Chinese food is so popular in this country, there is a variety of pea grown and picked for the thick, soft, green pods that are used in these dishes. Their roughage is great for the intestinal tract, and they are very nourishing. However, this herbaceous, tendril-climbing legume can be eaten, pod and all, in any variety, if picked young enough. Those people who are troubled with a lot of gas or with a sensitive stomach wall or intestinal tract may find the hulls of the more mature pea irritating. In such cases, the peas should be pureed, or liquefied, to avoid irritating disturbances.

Fresh green peas tend to lose their sugar content unless they are refrigerated to about 32 degrees F shortly after being picked. They should be cooked soon after they have been picked, for they lose their tenderness and sweetness as they age. Shell just before cooking, retaining a few of the pods to cook with the peas for additional flavor. Cook in as little water as possible, so that no water need be discarded after cooking. If some pot liquor does remain after cooking, use it soup or as a base in the liquefied vegetable drink.

Never cook peas in bicarbonate of soda water in order to keep their fresh green appearance. This method not only destroys the food value and digestibility of the pea, but is totally unnecessary. Peas cooked in a vessel that is vapor-sealed or that has a tight lid, or steamed in parchment paper, with little water, retain their flavor, greenness, and vitamins. When combined with carrots or turnips, peas are particularly tasty, and when a little onion is added, they need not be seasoned. If seasoning is desired, add a little dehydrated broth powder after cooking and serve with butter.

The pea is a fairly rich source of incomplete protein. As an alkaline ash vegetable, it is highly nutritious when eaten raw, and is more easily digested than beans. However, it takes a strong digestive tract to properly digest raw peas. To eat in their raw state, liquefy, and combine with other vegetables, proteins, or starches, to help aid in their digestion. Do not combine with fruits.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

This alkaline-reacting vegetable is an outstanding source of vitamins A, B1, and C. The pea pods are very high in chlorophyll, iron, and calcium-controlling properties. Discarded pods are discarded vitamins and valuable minerals. Fresh garden peas are slightly diuretic in action. They also give relief to ulcer pains in the stomach because they help use up the stomach acids. In cases of ulcers, however, peas should be pureed. People who have a vitamin A deficiency should eat them raw, liquefied, or in juice. They should be eaten in combination with non-starchy vegetables to get the full value of the vitamin A they contain.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 201

Protein: 13.7g

Fat: 9.8g

Carbohydrates: 36.1g

Calcium: 45mg

Phosphorus: 249mg

Iron: 3.9mg

Vitamin A: 1,390 I.U.

Thiamine: .69mg

Riboflavin: .33mg

Niacin: 5.5mg

Ascorbic Acid: 54mg

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