Foundation for Advancement in Cancer Therapy

Non-Traditional Approaches to
the Theories, Treatments and Prevention of Cancer

Melon

June 29, 2015

The many varieties of the popular melon give us certain elements not found in any other food. The honeydew melon originated in Asia, and it is believed that, as early as 2,400 B.C., this distinct type of muskmelon was growing in Egypt. The cantaloupe is native to India and Guinea and has been cultivated for more for more than 2,000 years. In Europe, it was first grown from seed transported from its native habitat.

The highly alkalizing honeydew was introduced to America in 1900 and Arizona and California have become the biggest producers. It is available the year around, but it is at its peak of abundance in July through September. The cantaloupe is available from late May through September, but is most abundant in June and July.

Both the honeydew and the casaba, which is another variety of winter melon, are usually picked before maturity and ripened off the vine. Cantaloupe, however, do not develop any additional sugar after they are picked. This melon should be picked when it is still hard and pulls off the vine smoothly, without leaving a jagged scar.

Learn to select melons by the color and firmness of their rind, and by fragrance. The cantaloupe may have a coarse netting over its surface (with a yellow, not green color beneath when ripe), or it may be of fine texture, depending again upon variety. Choose cantaloupe for their sweet fragrance. The casaba rind is golden in color and should feel heavy when ripe. A ripe honeydew has a creamy yellow surface color, and usually the scar in the blossom end yields to slight pressure.

The coloring of the flesh also is important, both as to degree of ripeness and to pleasing the eye and thus the palate. When fully ripe, casaba melons are cream in color, honeydews a yellowish cream in color, and cantaloupes either a light or dark shade of salmon, depending upon variety. Deeply colored flesh in the melon denotes that it will be high in vitamin A.

It is important to pick a thoroughly ripe watermelon in order to receive the greatest benefit. A ripe watermelon, when thumped with the fingers, has a dull, hollow sound. Another test of a good ripe melon is to try to scrape the rind with the fingernail; when the green skin comes off easily, the melon is ready to be eaten. Good watermelon has firm, crisp, juicy flesh and is never dry or fibrous.

Melons are very high in silicon, especially if eaten right down to the rind. When we discard watermelon rind, we are missing one its greatest elements. To obtain the gland- and blood-building chlorophyll, run the rind through a liquifier or juicer.

Watermelon, of course, is well-known as an efficient eliminator. Because it has such a high content of water and soluble chemicals, it can go into the bloodstream quickly and reach many of the organs of the body, depositing the chemicals needed to carry away waste.

During melon season, we should strengthen the body for the winter months with a “melon reserve” of vitamins A, B, and C, which are found in delightful form in the melon family.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Melon gives us an excellent supply of distilled water, along with the finest mineral elements possible. Many of us think we are drinking enough water, but our city water supplies do not give us “pure” water. Melons with their root system, pick up water from deep, in-ground reserves, and bring it to our tables in a delicious fruit substance. Consider the melon for rejuvenation and alkalinizing the body. Melons also are excellent for aiding elimination.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 65

Protein: 1.0 g

Fat: 0.4 g

Carbohydrates: 14.4 g

Calcium: 15 mg

Phosphorus: 25 mg

Iron: 0.4 mg

Vitamin A: 1,240 I.U.

Thiamine: .10 mg

Riboflavin: .11 mg

Niacin: 0.4 mg

Ascorbic acid: 13 mg

Cucumber

June 22, 2015

The cucumber is said to be native to India, although plant explorers have never been able to discover a wild prototype. Cucumbers have been cultivated for thousands of years, and records indicate that they were used as food in ancient Egypt, and were a popular vegetable with the Greeks and Romans. The cucumber is one of the few vegetables mentioned in the Bible.

In 200 B.C. a Chinese ambassador: traveled as far as Persia, where he saw cucumbers for the first time. Later, he brought them to China. At a later date, an English sea captain, returning from the West Indies, brought back pickled gherkins to Mrs. Samuel Pepys. Shortly after this period, cucumbers were grown in England.

Occasionally, in a collection of old glass, a plain glass tube or cylinder resembling a lamp chimney with parallel sides will tum up. This may be an English cucumber glass, a device used at one time to make cucumbers grow straight. George Stephenson, inventor of the locomotive, is credited with its invention.

Florida is the principal producer of cucumbers, supplying al­ most one-third of the total United States commercial crop for mar­ ket. California, North and South Carolina, New Jersey, and New York are also large producers.

Cucumbers for slicing should be firm, fresh, bright, well­ shaped, and of good medium or dark green color. The flesh should be firm and the seeds immature. Withered or shriveled cucumbers should be avoided. Their flesh is generally tough or rubbery and somewhat bitter. Over maturity is indicated by a generally over­ grown, puffy appearance. The color of over mature cucumbers is generally dull and not infrequently yellowed, the flesh is tough, the seeds hard, and the flesh in the seed cavity almost jelly-like. Cu­ cumbers in this condition should not be used for slicing. Some varieties are of solid green color when mature enough for slicing. but usually a little whitish color will be found at the tip, with a tendency to extend in lines along the seams, where they advance from pale green to white, and finally yellow with age.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Cucumbers are alkaline, non-starchy vegetables. They are a cooling food, especially when used in vegetable juices. Long ago it was believed that people would die from eating the peelings, but this is not true.

Cucumbers are wonderful as a digestive aid, and have a purify­ing effect on the bowel. It is not necessary to soak them in salt water. Serve them thinly sliced, raw, in sour cream, lemon juice, or yogurt for a delightful summer dish. They have a marvelous effect on the skin, and the old saying ”keeping cool as a cucumber” is literally true because of its cooling effect on the blood.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 39

Protein: 2.2 g

Fat: 0.3 g

Carbohydrates: 8.6 g

Calcium: 32 mg

Phosphorus: 67 mg

Iron: 1.0 mg

Vitamin A: 0 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.11 mg

Riboflavin: 0.14 mg

Niacin: 0.7 mg

Ascorbic Acid: 27 mg

Lime

June 15, 2015

The lime is native to southeastern Asia and has been cultivated for thousands of years. It is believed that the Arabs brought them from India during the period of Mohammedan expansion in A.D. 570-900. From the earliest days of British sailing vessels, British sailors were given a regular ration of lime juice to prevent scurvy at sea, resulting in the nickname Limey for British sailors.

Limes have been grown in California and Florida since the early days of the citrus industry. After the great freeze in Florida in 1894-95, when the lemon industry was almost totally destroyed, California began growing virtually all the lemons in the United States. At this time Florida’s lime industry expanded, and now Florida grows most of the limes used in this country. California is second in production, and Mexico is a close third. Limes grow all year. Florida produces them from April to April, and California from October throughout the year. The main season for imports is May through August.

Limes that are green in color and heavy for their size are the most desirable commercially, because of their extreme acidity. The full, ripe, yellow lime does not have a high acid content. If the lime is kept until fully ripe it may be used in the very same way the lemon is used, and to fortify other foods with vitamin C. Like lemons, limes are very high in vitamin C, are a good source of vitamin B1, and are rich in potassium. They spoil easily, and limes with a dry, leathery skin or soft, moldy areas should be avoided. Store limes in a cool, dry place.

Limes contain 5 to 6 percent citric acid, and are too acid to drink without sweetening. Their natural flavor is enhanced when combined with other juices. Limes make a delicious dressing for fish, and, when added to melons, bring out the natural flavor of the melon. A few drops of lime juice added to consommé, or jellied soups, give a particular zest to the flavor. Sub-acid fruits, such as apples, pears, plums, peaches, grapes, and apricots, go best with limes.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Limes are good for the relief of arthritis because they have such a high vitamin C content. They are especially good for anyone with acidemia, because they are one of the most alkalinizing foods. A drink of lime juice and whey is a wonderful cooler for the brain and nervous system. Limes can be used to treat brain fever, or someone who is mentally ill. They are good for a brain with a great deal of hot blood in it, which usually shows itself in anger, hatred, or other brain disturbances. Limes make a wonderful sedative for those suffering from these afflictions.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (without rinds or seeds)

Calories: 107

Protein: 2.8g

Fat: .8g

Carbohydrates: 42.4g

Calcium: 126mg

Phosphorus: 69mg

Iron: 2.3mg

Vitamin A: 50 I.U.

Thiamine: .1mg

Riboflavin: .08mg

Niacin: .7mg

Ascorbic Acid: 94mg

Rethinking Cancer Newsletter #52

June 14, 2015

Filed under: Rethinking Cancer Newsletters — ggrieser @ 10:05 am

Drum roll, please! We are happy to announce that our documentary film, Rethinking Cancer, is now available for streaming on Amazon.com!

The film, which tells the stories of 5 long-term recovered patients who chose the nontoxic metabolic/Biorepair approach to healing, continues to receive wide acclaim around the world and appears to have no expiration date! This is because, as more and more individuals are seeking an alternative to the horrors and limits of conventional treatments, these stories are as relevant as ever. We hope that streaming will enable more people to learn what is possible. We also hope you’ll share this with family, friends AND your doctors, so that they can view the film and broaden their understanding. People have a right to know all viable medical options.

To your health!
Foundation for Advancement in Cancer Therapy (FACT)

P.S. The DVD of the film, of course, can still be ordered on our Donate page, but we do hope you’ll help spread the word on streaming. “See” you on TwitterFacebook and our YouTube channel!

The Reason For Childhood Diseases
By Philip Incao, M.D.

Acute inflammations like colds, flus and fevers seem to be an inescapable part of life:
everyone experiences them. Why do we get them? Many of us have noticed (if not, then our spouses have noticed!) that we often come down with a cold or flu when we are overly stressed or depleted. We explain this by assuming that stress lowers our resistance to the viruses and bacteria that, we believe, like to attack us and make us sick. Most of the time we peacefully coexist with these microbes which everywhere share our environment, and if we get sick it’s often because we’ve allowed ourselves to get out of balance. This applies to children too, but only partially.

In children, studies have shown that respiratory infections increase in frequency from
birth until a peak by age 6 followed by a sharp decline after age 7, irrespective of treatment. In other words, it seems to be a normal feature of childhood to experience a variety of acute inflammations, especially respiratory, in the first seven years of life. READ MORE

Backyard Botanicals…..

For much of the Northern Hemisphere, it was a long, tough winter. But spring has arrived and, for many of us, that means time to think about the garden. Here are a few plants you might want to cultivate for their health benefits, as well as natural beauty:

Aloe (Aloe vera) — A sun-loving evergreen with spiky yellow-orange flowers.
Uses: The “jelly” in the aloe leaves can soothe burns, itches and dry skin.
Trivia: Cleopatra, the last active pharaoh of Ancient Egypt, who reigned from 51-20 B.C., renowned for her intellect and striking beauty, used aloe in her skin regimen.

Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) — An herbaceous bush with fragrant purple wands.
Uses: Attracts helpful insects, repels rabbits and can be used in cooking. The smell of lavender is lovely, and is used both as a cosmetic scent and a treatment to reduce stress.
Trivia: In Biblical times the Queen of Sheba anointed herself with lavender and other fragrant oils to capture King Solomon’s heart. Queen Victoria drank lavender tea to ease her headaches. READ MORE

…..With Kudos to Our Wormy Friends

Charles Darwin estimated that good soil has about 53,000 worms in each acre. Taking that down to the garden scale suggests that a 10-by-20 foot backyard garden patch with decent soil has about 250 earthworms. Each worm is capable of producing, over a year, a third of a pound of castings, which works out to 80 pounds of top-quality fertilizer being added to that garden plot every year. It’s free of chemical fertilizers, requiring no transportation from the garden store and no work on the gardener’s part.

Worms don’t ask for much in return for their good work — just plenty of organic matter (from plant cuttings, vegetable and fruit peelings, etc.) and enough moisture to keep them active and healthy. But it’s not a stress-free job. Artificial fertilizers provide no food for earthworms and may repel them because of the high soluble salt content. And worms are prey to other creatures — a favorite high-protein snack for some birds, along with moles and skunks.

All things considered, it’s a beautiful system going on in the soil and worms are the key. If you’ve got good worms, generally speaking, you’ve got good soil.

Oregano — The Joyful Protector

Oregano, Greek for “joy of the mountain,” is so much more than a pizza seasoning! The herb was virtually unheard of in the U.S. until soldiers came back from Italian World War II assignments raving about it. But Hippocrates, “father of medicine,” was onto its antiseptic properties way back in ancient Greece, using it to treat digestive and respiratory diseases. The Romans favored oregano for stimulating hair growth, while the Turks found it useful for pain relief from tooth decay, as an antiseptic for wounds, and a remedy for all kinds of inflammation – psoriasis, tonsillitis, inflamed gums, to name just a few.

This culinary and medicinal herb is a nutrient powerhouse, containing vitamins A, C, E and K, along with fiber, folate, iron, magnesium, vitamin B6, calcium and potassium. It’s also loaded with phytochemicals, the full health benefits of which are just beginning to be understood by modern science. Multitudes of studies have uncovered the effectiveness of oregano for a wide range of conditions, from fighting intestinal and vaginal infections, parasites, food poisoning, calming colitis, treating colon cancer, Alzheimer’s and much more. READ MORE

Chicken Oreganata

  • 2 boned organic chicken breasts, split
  • 1 cup lemon juice
  • 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 garlic clover, minced or pressed
  • 1 tablespoon dried oregano
  • ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • unrefined salt to taste (sea salt, Himalayan, Celtic)
  1. Wash and pat the chicken dry. Combine lemon juice, olive oil, garlic, oregano and pepper in a small bowl. Put the mixture in a plastic ziplock bag, add the chicken and seal. Shake the bag to make sure the chicken is evenly doused with marinade. Refrigerate overnight (or about 10-12 hours).
  2. Remove chicken from marinade. Discard marinade. Place the chicken in a shallow baking dish, lightly coated with coconut oil or butter. Bake in a 3750 F. oven for 30 minutes, turning once midway. Makes 4 servings. Enjoy!

Rethinking Cancer Newsletter #51

Filed under: Rethinking Cancer Newsletters — ggrieser @ 10:03 am

“There are only two days in the year that nothing can be done. 
One is called yesterday and the other is called tomorrow, so today is the right day
to love, believe, do and, mostly, live.”
 — Dalai Lama

“The best things in life make you sweaty” — Edgar Allen Poe

The Dalai Lama and Edgar Allen Poe are not your usual bedfellows. But when, by chance, we came across these two quotes, we had to acknowledge a certain confluence, a shared wavelength — both celebrating the importance of living fully in the moment. We hope you’ll join in the festivities!

Welcome to the here and now! It’s 2015 — FACT’s 44th year!

To your health!
Foundation for Advancement in Cancer Therapy (FACT)

P.S. Your continued generous support makes FACT possible — thanks so much! Check out new listings on our Practitioner Directory, and do join us on TwitterFacebook and our YouTube channel!

Is Tech Dumbing Us Down?

Scientists tell us that keeping our minds active is as important as physical exercise, so iPhones, laptops, and the like must be making us smarter, right?

According to The Shallows: What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains, a Pulitzer-nominated 2011 book by Nicholas Carr, tech advancements definitely have their positive side, but excessive use can come with unintended, possibly severe, consequences. Here are some of the ways: READ MORE

Why Smile?

• Smiles cost nothing, but add value to everything.
• Smiles enrich those who receive them without impoverishing those who give them.
• Smiles happen in a flash, but the memory of them sometimes lasts forever.
• None are so rich they can get along without smiles, and none so poor they are not richer for their benefits.
• Smiles create happiness and foster goodwill wherever they are given; they are the countersign of friends.
• Smiles cannot be bought, begged, borrowed or stolen for they are something that is no good to anybody until given way.
• Smiles are rest to the weary, sunlight to the discouraged, a morale boost to the sad, and Nature’s antidote for countless ills.
• If others are too tired, preoccupied or serious to give you a smile, leave one of yours anyway. Nobody needs a smile so much as those who have none to give.

Chinese Proverb: “A man without a smiling face must not open a shop.”

What’s in a “Moo”?

In search of ways to evaluate the welfare of animals, researchers in England have been eavesdropping on “conversations” between cows and their calves. Using highly advanced acoustic equipment and analysis techniques — never before applied for this purpose — they discovered that moos convey a lot more meaning than ever imagined!

The scientists spent 10 months digitally recording call sounds from two herds of free-range cattle on a farm in Radcliffe-on-Trent, Nottinghamshire. After a year analyzing all the data gathered, it was determined that mother cows use two types of contact calls with their calves: a quiet low-frequency call when the calf is nearby and a loud high-frequency call when the calf is far away. Calves produce one type of contact call when they’re separated from their mothers and they want to nurse.

But that’s not all the news about cow vocalizations. READ MORE

Does Apple Cider Vinegar Each Day
Keep the Doctor Away?

Raw (unpasteurized) apple cider vinegar (ACV) has been used for healing by most all civilizations going back at least 10,000 years. It’s been touted as a cure for just about everything from coughs to constipation to cancer. But is there any truth to all the lofty claims?

The fact is, not a lot of scientific research has been done on ACV because, not surprisingly, there’s not much commercial interest in investigating natural remedies. The big money is in patenting drugs made from synthetic materials. But the few studies that have been done, as well as the weight of historical and anecdotal evidence, show that ACV can be, indeed, quite a useful thing to have around for humans, as well as animals, internally and topically, for a variety of situations like managing type 2 diabetes, skin and stomach problems, infections, sore throat, cough, arthritis and much more.

The source of ACV’s power, however, is rather a paradox. READ MORE

Not Your Supermarket Ketchup

  • 1 ½ cups tomatoes, chopped
  • 2-3 tablespoons raw honey
  • ¼ cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon unrefined salt (sea salt, Himalayan, Celtic)
  • 1 tablespoon raw apple cider vinegar
  • Optional seasonings: ¼ teasp. mustard, pinch ground cloves, ground allspice, cayenne
  • ½ cup sun-dried tomatoes (dry — do not soak)
  1. Blend everything except the sun-dried tomatoes until smooth. Add the sun-dried and blend until you get a ketchup-y consistency.
  2. Place the ketchup in a jar in the refrigerator. Keeps a week or so (for peak flavor).

Rethinking Cancer Newsletter #50

Filed under: Rethinking Cancer Newsletters — ggrieser @ 10:01 am

Holiday special! As an end of the year gift to our RC visitors — and in celebration of our 50th Newsletter — we would like to offer a 15% discount on all orders submitted on our Donate page in December! Just type in the code “RETHINK” when ordering. And thanks for all your great support!

Meanwhile, high drama out in Oregon: the ballot initiative to require mandatory labeling of Genetically Modified Organism (GMO) foods has been in recount mode, the result to be announced tomorrow, Dec. 12th. In the Nov. 6 election only 812 votes — less than a tenth of a percentage point —appeared to separate the YES and NO campaigns. The NOs are clinging to a slight lead, thanks largely to the record-shattering $20.8 million spent by Monsanto and the big food industry producers. But it’s all a little too close for comfort for opponents of the measure who will next focus their big bucks on Congress to pass H.R. 4432 (referred to by labeling advocates as the DARK — Deny Americans the Right to Know — ACT). If passed, it will strip all states of the right to pass GMO labeling laws! Stay tuned……..

To your health!
Foundation for Advancement in Cancer Therapy (FACT)

P.S. We always welcome your feedback at info@rethinkingcancer.org and will look for you onTwitterFacebook and our YouTube channel! Have a wonderful holiday!

Cell Phones and Your Brain — Handle With Care!

Do wireless phones present a health risk? Commercials for cell phones that fill our airwaves, newspapers and magazines routinely feature young children happily chatting with their phones held smack up against their bodies and brains, and iPads plopped directly over young gonads. Headlines have repeatedly assured us that there’s little to worry about because we do not face an epidemic of brain cancer…….yet. In fact, the brain cancer story remains complex, because the disease has a long latency — up to four decades — and because past uses and users differ radically from current ones.

According to cell phone industry statements, the overwhelming majority of published studies in scientific journals around the world show that wireless phones do not pose a risk. However, when one removes the industry-funded studies, the overwhelming weight of evidence reveals there is a significant problem. READ MORE

Blue Mind: The Surprising Science That Shows
How Being Near, In, On, or Under Water Can Make You Happier, Healthier, More Connected, and Better at What You Do 
By Wallace J. Nichols

Reviewed by Nicola Joyce 
As I look up from the pages of this book, there’s nothing between me and the horizon but water. The only sounds are the hypnotic hiss of stones as they are dragged back by waves and the occasional call of a gull. Fresh air gusts over the water’s surface, picking up notes of saltwater and seaweed. My mind is perfectly at peace. And it’s no surprise that I’ve headed to the beach to read Blue Mind. The author, Wallace J. Nichols, would tell me that I sought out the nearest body of water because I instinctively knew it would settle my mind, sharpen my senses and put me in a more productive state. But what I didn’t know — until I read the book — was why this happens. READ MORE

The Worth of Your Salt

Humans have been harvesting salt from the sea for at least 8,000 years. A precious, hard sought commodity, salt was considered “white gold” — essential for food preservation, especially meats, proper digestion and flavoring bland foods, an antiseptic. In Roman times, the word for salt (“sal”) came from Salus, “goddess of health.” Soldiers were paid in part in salt, the origin of the word “salary.” If they did not measure up to the job, they were not “worth their salt” and their salary was cut.

What happened to this ancient wisdom? Nowadays, conventional food gurus demonize salt because it can lead to hypertension, heart disease and such. But, like so much of popular diet rhetoric today, the full picture has been lost. Our bodies need salt to survive, but we need the right kind and quantity.

The problem is, what most people are eating today is processed table salt which is completely worthy of vilification. Processed table salt contains 97.5% sodium chloride. The rest is man-made chemicals, e.g., moisture absorbents, flow agents like ferrocyanide, aluminosilicate, etc. The refining severely alters the chemical structure of the salt, so that it is, indeed, an irritant to the body. Natural unprocessed salts, such as sea salt, Himalayan or Celtic salt, contain about 84% sodium chloride. The remaining 16% are naturally-occurring trace minerals, such as silicon, phosphorus, vanadium, vital for proper body function. READ MORE

Hazelnut Not Too Hot Toddy

Hazelnut milk:
1 cup raw hazelnuts (soaked in water 3 hours or so)
3 cup pure water, preferably distilled

  • Toddy:
    2 cups hazelnut milk
  • 3-5 pitted dates (like medjool), soaked in water about an hour
  • ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon cloves
  • few dashes cayenne pepper (opt.)
  • ground nutmeg for garnish
  1. First, make the nut milk. Pour off soaking water and place hazelnuts in a blender. Add 3 cups water and blend very well. If not using a high-speed blender, like Vitamix, you may have to strain the “milk” with a strainer or nutmilk bag.
  2. Make the toddy just before serving. Pour off date soaking water. Place 2 cups nut milk in a blender, along with dates, cinnamon, cloves, cayenne. Blend until smooth and warm, but not hot. Pour into mugs, sprinkle a little nutmeg on top and serve! Cheers!

Grapes

June 8, 2015

The grape is one of the oldest fruits in history. Grape seeds have been found in mummy cases in Egyptian tombs that are more than 3000 years old. At the time of Homer, the Greeks were using wines, and the Bible tells of grape cultivation in the time of Noah. North America was known to the Norse sea rovers as “Vinland”. because the grapevines were so abundant.

The Mission Fathers of California were the first to grow the European type of grape. This variety became known as the Mission grape and remained the choice variety until 1860 when other choice European varieties were introduced into this country.

Between 6,000 and 8,000 of grapes have been named and described, but only 40 to 50 varieties are important commercially. Table grapes must be attractive in appearance and sweet and firm. Large size, brilliant color, and beautifully formed bunches are the qualities desired.

There are four classes of grapes: wine grapes, table grapes, raisin grapes, and sweet (non-fermented) juice grapes. The big grape producing states, in addition to California, are New York, Michigan, and Washington.

Domestic grapes are available from late July through March, and the peak is from August to November. Grapes are also imported from February through May from Argentina, Chile, and South Africa.

Emperor grapes are a Thanksgiving and Christmas favorite. The clusters are large, long, and well-filled. The fruit is uniform, large, elongated obovoid, light red to reddish-purple, seeded, neutral in flavor, and the skin tough. They are on the October and well into March.

Thompson Seedless were first grown in California near Yuba City by Mr. William Thompson and are now very popular. The clusters are large, long, and well-filled; the fruit is medium-sized and ellipsoidal. The color is greenish-white to light golden. They are seedless, firm, and tender, and are very sweet when fully ripened. They are moderately tender skinned. Thompson Seedless grapes are on the market from late June into November.

The Tokay variety grows in large clusters that are conical and compact. The grapes are large, ovoid with a flattened end, and brilliant red to dark red. They are seeded, very firm, neutral in flavor and have thick skins. Tokay grapes are on the market from September into November.

Other table varieties include Almeria, Cornichon, Red and White Malaga, Ribier, Lady Fingers, Catawba, Delaware, and Niagara.

The principal juice grape is the Concord, a leading native grape, that is blue-black in color, medium-sized, and tough-skinned. It is also used as a table grape and is on the market in September and October.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Grapes are used throughout the world for curative purposes. In France, it not uncommon for people to use grapes as their sole diet for many days during the grape season. . The low incidence of cancer in these areas has been attributed to the high percentage of grapes in the daily diet. The therapeutic value of grapes is said to be due to a high magnesium content. Magnesium is an element that for good bowel movements. Grape are wonderful for re-placing this chemical element.

The juice of the Concord grape is one of the best to use. Juice from other grapes, however, can be used as well. If the juice is too sweet juice or upsets the stomach a little lemon juice can be added. Mix with pineapple juice or any citrus fruit, if desired. Used in combination with whey, soy milk, and egg yolk, it makes a wonderful tonic forthe blood. When purchasing bottled grape juice, be sure it is unsweetened.

Grape skins and seeds are good for bulk, but sometimes are irritating in conditions of colitis and ulcers, so they should not be eaten by persons who have these conditions.

When chewed well, bitter grape skins make a good laxative. There is also a laxative element found in the seeds.

Grapes are wonderful for promoting action of the bowel, cleansing the liver, and aiding kidney function. They are alkalinizing to the blood, and high in water content, so they add to the fluids necessary to eliminate hardened deposits that may have settled in any part of the body. They are wonderful for the kidneys and the bladder and are very soothing to the nervous system. The high content of grape sugar gives quick energy. Dark grapes are high in iron, which makes them good blood builders.

As grapes do not mix well with other foods, it is best to eat them alone. Make sure they are ripe, as the green acids are not good the blood. They also make a wonderful snack for children-they are sweet, and much better for them than candy!

Crushed grapes may be used as a pack on a tumor or growth. Any infected area will improve after a grape pack is applied. It can be placed on the area of disturbance for a period of three to four days.

A one-day-a-week grape diet is good, during the grape season. It can be used when elimination is desired.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 324

Protein: 3.5g

Fat: 1.8 g

Carbohydrates: 73.5 g

Calcium: 75 mg

Phosphorus: 92 mg

Iron: 2.6 mg

Vitamin A: 3301 I.U.

Thiamine: .24mg

Riboflavin: .12 mg

Niacin: 1.9 mg

Ascorbic acid: 17 mg

Cucumber

June 1, 2015

The cucumber is said to be native to India, although plant explorers have never been able to discover a wild prototype. Cucumbers have been cultivated for thousands of years, and records indicate that they were used as food in ancient Egypt, and were a popular vegetable with the Greeks and Romans. The cucumber is one of the few vegetables mentioned in the Bible.

In 200 B.C. a Chinese ambassador: traveled as far as Persia, where he saw cucumbers for the first time. Later, he brought them to China. At a later date, an English sea captain, returning from the West Indies, brought back pickled gherkins to Mrs. Samuel Pepys. Shortly after this period, cucumbers were grown in England.

Occasionally, in a collection of old glass, a plain glass tube or cylinder resembling a lamp chimney with parallel sides will tum up. This may be an English cucumber glass, a device used at one time to make cucumbers grow straight. George Stephenson, inventor of the locomotive, is credited with its invention.

Florida is the principal producer of cucumbers, supplying al­ most one-third of the total United States commercial crop for mar­ ket. California, North and South Carolina, New Jersey, and New York are also large producers.

Cucumbers for slicing should be firm, fresh, bright, well­ shaped, and of good medium or dark green color. The flesh should be firm and the seeds immature. Withered or shriveled cucumbers should be avoided. Their flesh is generally tough or rubbery and somewhat bitter. Over maturity is indicated by a generally over­ grown, puffy appearance. The color of over mature cucumbers is generally dull and not infrequently yellowed, the flesh is tough, the seeds hard, and the flesh in the seed cavity almost jelly-like. Cu­ cumbers in this condition should not be used for slicing. Some varieties are of solid green color when mature enough for slicing. but usually a little whitish color will be found at the tip, with a tendency to extend in lines along the seams, where they advance from pale green to white, and finally yellow with age.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Cucumbers are alkaline, non-starchy vegetables. They are a cooling food, especially when used in vegetable juices. Long ago it was believed that people would die from eating the peelings, but this is not true.

Cucumbers are wonderful as a digestive aid, and have a purify­ing effect on the bowel. It is not necessary to soak them in salt water. Serve them thinly sliced, raw, in sour cream, lemon juice, or yogurt for a delightful summer dish. They have a marvelous effect on the skin, and the old saying ”keeping cool as a cucumber” is literally true because of its cooling effect on the blood.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 39

Protein: 2.2 g

Fat: 0.3 g

Carbohydrates: 8.6 g

Calcium: 32 mg

Phosphorus: 67 mg

Iron: 1.0 mg

Vitamin A: 0 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.11 mg

Riboflavin: 0.14 mg

Niacin: 0.7 mg

Ascorbic Acid: 27 mg

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