Foundation for Advancement in Cancer Therapy

Non-Traditional Approaches to
the Theories, Treatments and Prevention of Cancer

Plums and Fresh Prunes

August 24, 2015

The early colonists found plums growing wild along the entire Eastern coast. They were one of many fruits eaten by the Indians before the coming of the white man, and reports of early explorers mention the finding of plums growing in abundance. Today however native plums are not important commercially. The European type of plums, Prunas Domestica, has replaced the native plum. Plum pits from Europe probably were brought to America by the first colonists, for it is reported that plums were planted by the Pilgrims in Massachusetts, and the French brought them to Canada.

Although plums came to America by way of Europe, they are believed to have originated in Western Asia in the region south of the Caucasus Mountains to the Caspian Sea. According to the earliest writings in which the European plum is mentioned,the species dates back at least 2000 years.

Another species, Prunus Institia, known to us as the Damson plum, also came to America by way of Europe. This plum was named for Damascus and apparently antedates the European type, although Damson pits have been found in the lake dwellings of Switzerland and in other ancient ruins.

Another important species, the Japanese plum, was domesticated in Japan, but originated in China. It was introduced in the United States about 1870. This type is grown extensively in California.

Plums have been grown in some of the Spanish mission gardens of California at least as early as 1792, and the first prune plums grown in California were produced in Santa Clara Mission. However, the present California prune industry is not based on these but the French prune, Petite Prune d’Agen, scions of which were brought to California from France in 1856 by Pierre Pellier. French-type prunes grown in California orchards were shipped in to San Francisco markets in 1859.

Botanically, plums and prunes of the European or Domestica type belong to the same species. The interchangeable use of the terms “plum and prune” dates back for several centuries. Plum is Anglo-Saxon, and prune is French. It is uncertain just when the word prune was first used to designate a dried plum or a plum suitable for drying. The prune is a variety of plum that can be dried without fermenting when the pit is left in. Fresh prunes, as compared with plums, have firmer flesh, higher sugar content, and frequently higher acid content. A ripe, fresh prune can be separated from the pit like a freestone peach, but a plum cannot be opened this way.

Of all the stone fruits, plums have the largest number and greatest diversity of kinds and species. H.F. Tysser, editor of Fruit Manual, published in London, says there are over 2000 varieties. Samual Fraser, in his book America Fruits, speaks of a list of about 1500 varieties of Old World plums alone, and says there probably are just as many varieties of plums native to this continent. In addition, there is a long list of Japanese and Chinese plums.

Almost all of the plums shipped in the United States are grown in California. There are two types of California plums, Japanese and European. The former marketed early in the season and the latter in mid season or later. The Japanese varieties are characterized by their large size, heart-shape, and bright red or yellow color. Japanese varieties are never blue.

Plums and prunes of good quality are plump, clean, of fresh appearance, full colored for the particular variety, and soft enough to yield to slight pressure. Unless one is well acquainted with varieties, color alone cannot be replied upon an indication of ripeness. Some varieties are fully ripe when the color is yellowish-green, others when the color is red, and others when purplish-blue or black. Softening at the tip is a good indication of maturity. Immature fruit is hard. It may be shriveled and is generally of poor color or flavor. Over mature fruit is generally soft, easily bruised, and is often leaky.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Fresh plums are more acid to the body than fresh prunes. When too many plums are eaten, an over acid condition results. When prunes are dried, however they are wonderful for the nerves because the contain a phosphorus content of nearly 5 percent.

Prunes have a laxative effect. The dried prune is better to eat than the fresh plum or prune. The salts contained in the dried prune are valuable as food for the blood, brain and nerves. The French prunes are considered the best for their value to the nervous system.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 218

Protein: 3 g

Fat: 0.9 g

Carbohydrates: 55.6 g

Calcium: 73 mg

Phosphorus: 86 mg

Iron: 2.2 mg

Vitamin A: 1200 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.28 mg

Riboflavin: 0.18 mg

Niacin: 2.1 mg

Ascorbic acid: 20 mg

Lettuce

August 17, 2015

Lettuce is one of the oldest vegetables and probably originated in India or Central Asia. According to the writings or Herodotus, lettuce was served to the Persian kings as far back as the sixth century BC. It was a popular Roman food at about the beginning of the Christian era, and in the first century AD a dozen distinctively different varieties were described by Roman writers of the era. There is also evidence that lettuce was grown in China in the fifth century AD.

Columbus may have carried lettuce seeds to the New World, for it was being cultivated in the Bahamas in 1494. It was a common vegetable in Haiti as early as 1565, and Brazil was reported to have cultivated before 1650. The early colonists evidently introduced lettuce into the US, and in 1806 16 varieties were reported growing in American gardens.

Both the English and Latin words for lettuce are based on the heavy, milky juice of the vegetable, which is characteristic of the lettuce family. The primitive forms of lettuce has long stems and large leafs grew at the end of these stems. These closed-packed lettuce heads were well developed in Europe by the 16th century, while the loose common head type of developed later.

Lettuce has become the most valuable truck crop, and 85% of the commercial crop is produced in the west-California, Arizona, Colorado, Washington, Oregon, and Idaho. The northeast and south Atlantic states are also important lettuce growing regions.

Lettuce is available all year, and the peak months are May, June, and July. Although the crisp head and butter head types are the most important from a commercial standpoint, the Cos or Romaine type are bets from a health standpoint, as the sun is allowed to penetrate each leaf. The leaves generally have less of the bitterness that is characteristic of some types of head lettuce. The “leaf” or the “bunching” type of lettuce is distinguished by loose leaves that do not form a head. This type is best for home gardening, as it can be grown in areas where the temperature is too high for successful growing of the other types of lettuce. The stem type lettuce has an enlarged stem and no head. The leaves are not as palpable as the other types of lettuce leaves except when young and tender. The stems are pulled and eaten raw or cooked.

Lettuce of good quality should be fresh, crisp, and tender, and if in head lettuce form, the head should be fairly firm to hard. Lettuce with a well developed seed stem has a bitter flavor.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Leaf lettuce is much richer in iron than head lettuce. We do not advocate using head lettuce in the diet, for it contains little nourishment. It contains significantly lower amounts of vitamins A and C than green Romaine lettuce. The darker green outside leaves contain a much higher proportion of the valuable food elements than the light colored inner leaves. Head lettuce is very gas forming , and really only offers bulk to the intestinal tract. It has an alkaline ash, however, and is not stimulating. Also, it is excellent for those who would like to lose weight. It also has many sleep promoting elements and makes good lettuce juice, which help promote sleep. It tends to slow down the digestive effect of the intestinal tract.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (head lettuce)

Calories: 57

Protein: 3.8 g

Fat: 0.6 g

Carbohydrates: 0.1 g

Calcium: 86 mg

Phosphorus: 78 mg

Iron: 1.6 mg

Vitamin A: 1,710 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.20 mg

Riboflavin: 0.21 mg

Niacin: 0.5 mg

Ascorbic acid: 24 mg

Blackberry

August 10, 2015

Blackberries are native to both North America and Europe, but cultivation of this fruit is largely limited to North America. In the early days of the United States, when land was cleared for pasture, blackberry bushes began to multiply. There are many hybrids of blackberries, and both man and nature have had a hand in this process. By 1850, cultivated blackberries had become very popular. Blackberries are now cultivated in almost every part of the United States. Texas and Oregon probably have the largest numbers of acres planted with blackberries. Cultivation of this berry has been slow, because wild berries grow in abundance all over the country. The summer months are the peak season for blackberries.

A quality berry is solid and plump, appears bright and fresh, and is a full black or blue color. Do not choose berries that are partly green or off-color, because the flavor will not be good.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Blackberries are high in iron, but can cause constipation. They have been used for years to control diarrhea. If blackberry juice is mixed with cherry or prune juice, the constipating effect will be taken away. If one can take blackberry juice without constipating results, it is one of the finest builders of the blood.

Much like spinach, raisins, apples, plums and grapes, blackberries are rich in bioflavonoids and Vitamin C, but other nutritional benefits include a very low sodium count and having only 62 calories to a cup. The dark blue colour ensures blackberries have one of the highest antioxidant levels of all fruits. Antioxidants, well-known for lowering the risk of a number of cancers, are a huge bonus, but be aware the berries are best consumed in their natural state to get the full benefits.

The berries are known by a variety of names, which include brambleberries, bramble, dewberry, thimbleberry and lawers. Consumption of blackberries can help to promote the healthy tightening of tissue, which is a great non-surgical procedure to make skin look younger. Prolonged consumption also helps keeps your brain alert, thereby maintaining clarity of thought and good memory. The high tannin content of blackberries provides a number of benefits to reduce intestinal inflammation, alleviate hemorrhoids and soothe the effects of diarrhea.

Traditionally, the leaves and barks of the plant have also been consumed. The leaves of blackberries have been used to treat mild inflammation of the gums and sometimes even sore throats. The astringent tannins are effective in oral hygiene when used as a gargle or mouthwash. The leaves can also be used in a refreshing cup of tea or enhanced as a therapeutic drink. Not everyone will like the flavor, so to mask the bitter taste, honey or another form of sweetener may be added. The healthy dose of Vitamin K aids in muscle relaxing, so some women use the berries to alleviate labor pains. As part of a regular diet, the juice can also be used to regulate menstruation as it is very effective in helping blood to clot.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 294

Protein: 5.4 g

Fat: 3.6 g

Carbohydrates: 59.9 g

Calcium: 163 mg

Phosphorus: 154 mg

Iron: 4.1 mg

Vitamin A: 1,460 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.12 mg

Riboflavin: 0.03 mg

Niacin: 1.3 mg

Ascorbic acid: 106 mg

Rasberry

August 3, 2015

The red raspberry was first cultivated about 400 years ago on European soil. Cultivation spread to England and the United States, where the native American raspberry was already well known.

In 1845, Dr. Brinkle of Philadelphia became the first successful producer of raspberries in this country, and he originated many varieties. By 1870, this berry had become an important crop in the United States.

The red raspberry is native to the northern United States, and the black raspberry is found in the South. The purple raspberry is a hybrid between the red and the black, and did not become important until about 1900.

The raspberry has a wide range of colors. A yellow is raspberry found growing wild in many areas, particularly in Maryland. The Asiatic species of raspberry has a color that ranges through red, orange, yellow, lavender, purple, wine, to black. Even white berries are found in many species in their wild state. Pink berries have been found in Alabama and Oregon, and lavender ones in North Carolina. In the West, the wild black raspberry is often not quite black, but rather a deep wine in color. The market berry is usually the cultivated berry and is both red and black. There are many varieties of each that are popular. The market runs from supply mid-April through August, and the peak month is July.

A quality berry is plump, with a clean, fresh appearance, a solid, full color, and is usually without adhering caps. Berries with caps attached may be immature. Overripe berries are usually dull in color, soft, and sometimes leaky.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Raspberries are considered a good cleanser for mucus, for catarrh conditions, and for toxins in the body. They are a good source of vitamins A and C. Raspberries leave an alkaline reaction. They should never be eaten with sugar.

Raspberries are wonderful in juice form and can be used as a cocktail before meals, since they stimulate the appetite. Raspberry juice is delicious mixed with other juices.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 177

Protein: 4.2 g

Fat: 0.4 g

Carbohydrates: 42.4 g

Calcium: 254 mg

Phosphorus: 150 mg

Iron: 1.5 mg

Vitamin A: 2,240 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.29 mg

Riboflavin: 0.30 mg

Niacin: 3.6 mg

Ascorbic acid: 166 mg

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