Foundation for Advancement in Cancer Therapy

Non-Traditional Approaches to
the Theories, Treatments and Prevention of Cancer

Asparagus

February 29, 2016

The ancient Phoenicians brought asparagus to the Greeks and Romans. It was described in the sixteenth century by the English writer Evelyn as “sperage” and he said that it was “delicious eaten raw with oil and vinegar.”

When selecting asparagus, choose spears that are fresh, firm, and tender (not woody or pithy), with tips that are tightly closed. Watch for signs of decay, such as rot and mold. If the tip of the spear appears wilted, the asparagus is really too old to be good. From the tip to all but an inch of the base, the stalk should be tender. Angular stalks indicate that they are tough and stringy.

Store asparagus wrapped in a damp cloth or waxed paper, and keep refrigerated until you are ready to use it. Asparagus loses its edible quality when it is subjected to dryness and heat, which reduce the sugar content and increase the fiber content.

Asparagus is a perennial herb, and is a member of the Lily of the Valley family. It can be served hot, with drawn butter; cold, in a salad; in soups; and as a sandwich filling or flavoring.

The season for asparagus is February through July, and the peak months are April, May, and June. Early spring asparagus is from California; late spring asparagus is shipped in early April or late May from Maryland, Delaware, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, Michigan, Illinois, and Iowa. Green asparagus is the most nutritious. Some varieties are green-tipped with white butts, and some are entirely white. Most of the white variety is canned.

Asparagus is best when cooked in stainless steel, on low heat. This leaves the shoots tender and retains their original color. If cooked with the tips up, more vitamin B1 and C will be preserved. The liquid can be saved and used in vegetable cocktails.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Asparagus acts as a general stimulant to the kidneys, but can be irritating to the kidneys if taken in excess or if there is extreme kidney inflammation. Because it contains chlorophyll, it is a good blood builder.

Green asparagus tips are high in vitamin A, while the white tips have almost none. This food leaves an alkaline ash in the body. Because they have a lot of roughage, only the tips can be used in a soft diet. They are high in water content and are considered a good vegetable in an elimination diet. Many of the elements that build the liver, kidneys, skin, ligaments, and bones are found in green asparagus. Green asparagus also helps in the formation of red blood corpuscles.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 90

Protein: 7.5g

Fat: .7g

Carbohydrates: 13.1g

Calcium: 71mg

Phosphorus: 211mg

Iron: 3.11mg

Vitamin A: 3,430 I.U.

Thiamine: .54mg

Riboflavin: .59mg

Niacin: 3.9mg

Ascorbic Acid: 113mg

Papaya

February 22, 2016

The papaya is native to Central America . From there it has been introduced to areas favorable to its growth in Asia, Africa and Polynesia. It is second only to the banana in importance in South and Central America and Hawaii. The papaya tree is actually a large shrub not unlike a palm in appearance, and bears fruit when it is only a few months old. The fruit resembles a melon with smooth skin, and is yellowish-orange in color when ripe. The flesh is a darker orange and is from one to two inches thick. In the center of the fruit are a large number of small, round, black seeds.

The papaya has been planted in Florida and Texas, where it has met with considerable success. In California its cultivation is confined to the most protected areas in the southern part of the state.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

The papaya is rich in vitamins. It is especially high in Vitamins A, C , and E, and is rich in calcium, phosphorus, and iron.

The papaya is high in digestive properties and has a direct tonic effect on the stomach. It is used in the treatment of stomach ulcers and fevers and has a high mucus solvent action. The papaya retains its potency in high temperatures.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 119

Protein: 1.8 g

Fat: 0.3 g

Carbohydrates: 30.4 g

Calcium: 61 mg

Phosphorus: 49 mg

Iron: 0.9 mg

Vitamin A: 5,320 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.12 mg

Riboflavin: 0.13 mg

Niacin: 0.9 mg

Ascorbic acid: 170 mg

Broccoli

February 15, 2016

Broccoli was grown in France and Italy in the sixteenth century, but was not well known in this country until 1923, when the D”Arrigo Brothers Company made a trial planting of Italian sprouting broccoli in California. A few crates of this were sent to Boston, and by 1925 the market was well established. Since then, the demand for broccoli has been steadily on the increase.

Broccoli is a member of the cabbage family. California, Arizona, and Texas are the main broccoli-producing states.

When choosing broccoli, look for tenderness in the stalk, espcially the upper portion. If the lower portion of the stalk is tough and woody, and if the bud dusters are open and yellow, the broccoli is over mature and will be tough. Fresh broccoli does not keep, so purchase only as much as you can immediately use.

Broccoli is often gas-forming, but if cooked in a steamer or over a very low fire, this may be avoided. Broccoli is best if under-cooked, because the more green that is left in broccoli, the more chlorophyll will be left to counteract the sulfur compounds that form gas.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

All of the foods in the cabbage family, including broccoli, are best if eaten with proteins, because the combination helps drive amino acids to the brain. Broccoli is high in vitamins A and C, and is low in calories. It is beneficial to the elimination system.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 103

Protein: 9.1 g

Fat: 0.6 g

Carbohydrates: 15.2 g

Calcium: 360 mg

Phosphorus: 211 mg

Iron: 5.6 mg

Vitamin A: 9,700 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.26 mg

Riboflavin: 0.59 mg

Niacin: 2.5 mg

Ascorbic acid: 327 mg

Grapefruit

February 8, 2016

The name grapefruit originated in the West Indies in the eighteenth century, perhaps because of the fact that its fruit grows in clusters of three to twelve or more, similar to grape clusters. This citrus fruit was cultivated more than 4000 years ago in India and Malaysia, but it was not until the sixteenth century that it was introduced to this country by the Spaniards. For many years it was not popular because of its slightly bitter taste. From 1880 to 1885 a group of Florida grapefruit growers shipped crates of the fruit to Philadelphia and New York and encouraged people to try it. In about 1915 the commercial sale of grapefruit expanded, until its production spread into three other states—California, Arizona, and Texas.

The United States furnishes about 97 percent of the world’s supply of grapefruit, and Florida and Texas together produce about 90 percent of the grapefruit grown in the United States. The Marsh seedless grapefruit is the most popular variety today.

The grapefruit tree is about the size of the orange tree and reaches a height of twenty to forty feet. Like the orange, it blooms in the spring. In California and Arizona, the fruit ripens throughout the year. Although grapefruit is available all year, it is most abundant from January through May. Grapefruit is also imported by the United States from Cuba in the late summer and early fall.

Grapefruit of good quality is firm, but springy to the touch, well-shaped, and heavy for its size—the heavier the fruit, the better. Do not choose soft, wilted, or flabby fruit. The heavy fruits are usually thin-skinned and contain more juice than those with coarse skin or those puffy or spongy to the touch.

Grapefruit often has a reddish brown color over the normal yellow, which is called “russeting.” Russeting does not affect the flavor in any way. Most of the defects found on the skin of the grapefruit are minor and do not affect the eating quality of the fruit. However, fruit with decayed spots is not desirable, as the decay usually affects the flavor. Decay may appear as a soft, discolored area on the stem end of the fruit or it may appear as a colorless area that breaks easily when pressure is applied. If the skin of the fruit appears rough, ridged, or wrinkled, it is likely to be thick-skinned.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Grapefruit is a subtropical acid fruit, and is highly alkaline in reaction. It is best eaten with other acid fruits, nuts, or milk. Eat grapefruit immediately after cutting into the rind to benefit from all of its goodness. For best digestion and assimilation, avoid eating grapefruit with sweeter fruits or with starches. The grapefruit is less acidulous than the lemon and is a good substitute when oranges or their juice cannot be tolerated, or when the alkaline reserves in the body need to be augmented.

Grapefruit is rich in vitamins C and B1, and is a good source of vitamin B12. It is low in calories, which makes it a good drink on a reducing diet. There is less sugar in grapefruit than in oranges. Eat the sun-ripened fruit when possible, as this fruit needs no sweetening, and is better for you. If sweetening is necessary, use a little honey.

Grapefruit is very rich in citric acids and their salts, and in potassium and calcium. Use it often in combination with meats, because grapefruit juice is excellent as an aid in the digestion of meats. However, avoid the overuse of all citric acid fruits as they are a powerful dissolver of the catarrhal accumulations in the body and the elimination of too much toxic material all at once may cause boils, irritated nerves, diarrhea, and other problems. People are often so eager to get vitamins and minerals into the body that they sometimes do not consider that the powerful action of citric acid causes irritation and discomfort.

When taken right before bedtime, grapefruit is conducive to a sound sleep. A drink of grapefruit juice first thing in the morning helps prevent constipation. It is also an excellent aid in reducing fevers from colds and the flu, and seldom causes allergic reactions.

Grapefruit rind contains the very valuable vitamin P, which is an important vitamin for healthy gums and teeth. This vitamin may be extracted by simmering the rind in water for about twenty minutes. Strain, and drink.

The sour taste of grapefruit increases the flow of digestive juices in the stomach. Grapefruit served at the beginning of a meal stimulates the appetite and helps in digestion.

This fruit is also good for any hardening of body tissue, such as hardening of the liver and the arteries. It can also help prevent stone formations.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 133

Protein: 1.5 g

Fat: 0.6 g

Carbohydrates: 30.3 g

Calcium: 51 mg

Phosphorus: 54 mg

Iron: 0.9 mg

Vitamin A: 4770 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.11 mg

Riboflavin: 0.06 mg

Niacin: 0.06 mg

Ascorbic acid: 12 mg

Turnip and Turnip Greens

February 1, 2016

The turnip, which belongs to the mustard family, is reported to have come from Russia, Siberia, and the Scandinavian peninsula. It has been used since ancient times. Columella wrote in A.D. 42 that two varieties of turnips were grown in what is now known as France. Pliny refers to five varieties, and stated that the broad-bot­tom flat turnip and the globular turnip were the most popular.

Back in the sixteenth century, giant turnips created comment. In 1558, Matthiolus spoke of having heard of long purple turnips weighing thirty pounds: however, this may be considered small compared with the turnip weighing one hundred pounds grown in California in 1850.

Cartier sowed turnip seed in Canada as early as 1540, and they were cultivated in Virginia in 1609, and in Massachusetts as early as 1629. In 1707 they were plentiful around Philadelphia, and their use was recorded in South Carolina as early as 1779.

Turnips may be served steamed, with drawn butter or cream sauce. They are also excellent raw and shredded in salads.

Turnip greens are excellent cooked the same way spinach is usually cooked. The greens should be cooked in a covered pan until tender, using only the water that clings to the leaves.

Regardless of variety, turnips have much the same flavor if grown under the same conditions. They may be distinguished by shape, as round, flat, or top-shaped, and also by color of the flesh­ white or yellow-by the color of the skin, and by the leaves. Vari­eties like Seven Top and Shogoin are grown almost exclusively for the leaves.

The most popular variety is the Purple Top White Globe. This variety has a large globe-shaped root, with an irregularly marked purple cap, and its flesh is white, sweet, crisp, and tender. The leaves are dark green, large, and erect.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Turnips are very high in sulfur and are sometimes gas forming. The root vegetable can be considered a carbohydrate vegetable. If eaten raw, they have a high content of vitamin C. Turnip juice is espe­cially good for any mucous and catarrhal conditions. They have been used successfully in all bronchial disturbances, even asthma. Turnip packs over the chest are good for relieving bronchial disor­ders and packs over the throat are good for sore throats. When fresh and young, turnips can be used raw in salads. They leave an alkaline ash, and have a low calorie content and low carbohydrate content. They can be used in most diets.

Turnip leaves are considered good for controlling calcium in the body, as are all other greens. They have been used successfully in the South to combat pellagra, which is a disease caused by lack of calcium in the body.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (root vegetable)

Calories: 117

Protein: 3.9 g

Fat: .8 g

Carbohydrates: 25.7 g

Calcium: 152 mg

Phosphorus: 117 mg

Iron: 2 mg

Vitamin A: trace I.U.

Thiamine: .16 mg

Riboflavin: .26 mg

Niacin: 2.2 mg

Ascorbic Acid: 140 mg

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (turnip greens only)

Calories: 140

Protein: 11 g

Fat: .1.5 g

Carbohydrates: 20.6 g

Calcium: 987 mg

Phosphorus: 190 mg

Iron: 9.1 mg

Vitamin A: 34,470 I.U.

Thiamine: .37 mg

Riboflavin: 2.15 mg

Niacin: 2.9 mg

Ascorbic Acid: 519 mg

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