Foundation for Advancement in Cancer Therapy

Non-Traditional Approaches to
the Theories, Treatments and Prevention of Cancer

Pear

December 19, 2016

Pears were used as food long before agriculture was developed as an industry. They are native to the region from the Caspian Sea westward into Europe. Nearly 1000 Years before the Christian Era, Homer referred to pears as growing in the garden of Alcinous. A number of varieties were known prior to the Christian Era. Pliny listed more than forty varieties of pears. Many varieties were known in Italy, France, Germany, and England by the time America was discovered.

Both pear seeds and trees were brought to the United States by the early settlers. Like the apple, pear trees thrived and produced well from the very start. As early as 1771 the Prince Nursery on Long Island, New York, greatest of the colonial fruit nurseries, listed forty-two varieties. The introduction of pears to California is attributed to the Franciscan Fathers. Led by Father Junipera Serra, in 1776, they planted seeds carried from the Old World.

In the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries greatly improved pears were developed, particularly in Belgium and France. In 1850, pears were so popular in France that the fruit was celebrated in song and verse, and it was the fashion among the elite to see who could raise the best specimen. When the better varieties were brought into the United States a disease attacked the bark, roots, and other soft tissues of the trees, and practically destroyed the industry in the East. The European pear thrives primarily in California, Oregon, and Washington and in a few narrow strips on the south and east sides of Lake Michigan, Lake Erie, and Lake Ontario, where there are relatively cool summers and mild winters. Under these conditions, the trees are not as susceptible to pear blight, or “fire blight.”

Another kind of pear, distinguished from the European “butter fruit” with its soft, melting flesh, had developed in Asia, and is known as the sand pear. These have hard flesh with numerous “sand” or grit cells. Sand pears reached the United States before 1840, by way of Europe, and proved resistant to fire blight. Hybrids of sand pears and European varieties are now grown extensively in the eastern and southern parts of the United States. They are inferior to the European pear, but still better to eat than the original sand pear. The best European varieties grow in the Pacific States, and from these states come most of the pears used for sale as fresh fruit for processing.

Pears are grown in all sections of the country, but the Western states (California, Oregon, and Washington), produce approximately 87 to 90 percent of all pears sold commercially. Practically all pears that are processed come from the Western states.

More than 3000 varieties are known in the United States, but less than a dozen are commercially important today. The Bartlett outranks all other varieties in quantity of production and in value. It is the principal variety grown in California and Washington and is also the important commercial pear in New York and Michigan. It originated in England and was first distributed by a Mr. Williams, a nurseryman in Middlesex. In all other parts of the world it is known as Williams or Williams’ Bon-Chretien. It was brought to the United States in 1798 or 1799 and planted at Roxbury, Massachusetts under the name of Williams’ Bon Chretien. In 1817 Enoch Bartlett acquired the estate, and not knowing the true name of the pear, distributed it under his own name. The variety is large, and bell-shaped, and has smooth clear yellow skin that is often blushed with red. It has white, finely grained flesh, and is juicy and delicious.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Pears have a fairly high content of vitamin C and iron. They are good in all elimination diets and are a wonderful digestive aid. They help normalize bowel activity.

Pears have an alkaline excess. They are a good energy producer in the winter, when used as a dried fruit, and are a delicious summer food when fresh.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 236

Protein: 2.6 g

Fat: 1.5 g

Carbohydrates: 59.6 g

Calcium: 49 mg

Phosphorus: 60 mg

Iron: 1.1 mg

Vitamin A: 90 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.8 mg

Riboflavin: 0.16 mg

Niacin: 0.5 mg

Ascorbic acid: 15 mg

Rethinking Cancer Newsletter #59

December 13, 2016

Filed under: Rethinking Cancer Newsletters — ggrieser @ 5:57 pm

First, the infuriating news: Just as Vermont’s mandatory GMO labeling law was taking effect this July, the U.S. Congress passed, and the president signed, the gutless bill, S. 764, which, in effect, lets anti-labelers off the hook. This is a depressing manifestation of the power of money vs. the will of the American people. According to Organic Consumers Association, Monsanto and other Big Food corporations (e.g., Kellogg, Dow, Dupont, General Mills, Coca Cola) have spent well over 100 million dollars fighting our right to know if GMOs are in our food. For the time being, they have won. But we still hold the winning card: we don’t have to buy what they’re selling! Join in the boycott of products from these conglomerates, many of which are gobbling up small organic companies that you may have come to rely on.

And now, some good news: We are delighted to announce a new addition to the roster of materials on our Donate page. It is the audiobook for Detoxification by Ruth Sackman, co-founder and former president of FACT, narrated by current president, Consuelo Reyes. This is a concise handbook for anyone interested in taking charge of their health — more accessible now in audio as people are increasingly juggling busy schedules with the need for solid information. In the next few months, we’ll also introduce a new ebook, The Unconventional Wisdom of Ruth Sackman, a compendium of her writings over the past 4 decades. The book will be loaded with practical, timeless information, expressed in Ruth’s inimitable down-to-earth style.

To your health!

Foundation for Advancement in Cancer Therapy (F.A.C.T.)

P.S. Remember to check out our film, Rethinking Cancer, now available for streaming on iTunes in North America and many countries. Thanks for all your comments and support. Do join us on Twitter,Facebook and our YouTube channel!

What Is a Healthy Diet?

A recent New York Times article surveyed a panel of nutrition “experts” and the general public about which foods they thought were good or bad. There was vast disparity between, as well as within, the two groups. Foods that the “experts” generally considered less healthy (e.g., granola bar, coconut oil, frozen yogurt, granola) were considered very healthy by the public. Foods considered healthy by the “experts” (e.g., quinoa, tofu, sushi, hummus, shrimp) were designated less healthy by the public. While both groups pretty much agreed on the goodness of foods like kale, apples, oatmeal, so-called experts and the public were nearly equally unsure about the healthfulness of basic items like butter, red meat, whole milk, pork chops, etc. —foods, coincidentally, containing saturated fat  which many well-publicized studies have shown to be good for heart and overall health, contrary to myths propagated by the food processing industry.

What’s missing in all this is awareness of any overarching principles. For clarity, we look to the expertise of the Weston A. Price Foundation (WAPF), an organization founded on the wisdom of traditional cultures, unburdened by TV, fast food producers, certified nutritionists or dieticians. READ MORE

The Balancing Act

Improving balance is a lifelong project — from wobbly toddlerhood to the freedom-loving Golden Years. Good balance gives us confidence to move about in a fast-paced world. It’s the key to just about any activity from riding a bike to navigating a slippery sidewalk to doing yoga or any sport and it’s especially important to help prevent falls and maintain an independent lifestyle.

So here are a few exercises to hone your daily balancing act at any age. For best results, do these at least 3-4 times per week and, if possible, go barefoot. READ MORE

DIY: Personal Care Products

Read any good product labels lately? Too many personal care products, even on health food store shelves, abound in questionable ingredients like parabens, phthalates, chemical emulsifiers, artificial colors, alcohol, synthetic fragrances (which can have up to 500 unlisted components), artificial flavors, sweeteners, and numerous other multi-syllabic synthetics.

According to the Environmental Working Group, the average adult absorbs up to 5 pounds of chemicals in their care products every year — many of which have been shown to contribute to hormonal imbalances, cancer, eczema, and a wide range of other conditions. A lot of these chemical additives are banned in other countries, yet still allowed in the United States. Moreover, many of these ingredients, aside from being outright harmful, are very drying to the skin, such as alcohol and water (usually the first 2 ingredients listed on most “moisturizers”) or otherwise counterproductive, especially to chemically-sensitive individuals.

Why spend a lot of money on things you can make yourself with fewer and far better materials? Here are some easy-to-do items: READ MORE

Switchel — The Healthy “Gatorade”

Gatorade Thirst Quencher, the highly sugared sports drink purported to rehydrate and refuel athletes, contains water, sucrose (table sugar), dextrose, citric acid, natural flavor, sodium chloride (table salt), sodium citrate, monopotassium phosphate, and flavoring/coloring ingredients; some Gatorade flavor variations use brominated vegetable oil as a stabilizer.

Who needs all that when you can rehydrate and tonify your body with a refreshing drink made with just a few unquestionably health-inducing ingredients? Switchel was a popular summer drink in the American colonies in the late 17th century and became a traditional thirst quencher for farmers during harvest time by the 19th century. Today, several companies are producing it as interest grows in “new” traditional foods, but it’s easy to make you own:

2 quarts pure water (preferably distilled)

½ cup raw apple cider vinegar

½ cup raw honey (orange blossom or tupelo go particularly well with this recipe) or pure

maple syrup

2 tsp. organic ginger powder or 2 ½ Tbsp. fresh grated ginger

Optional: 1 tsp. turmeric powder, pinch of cardamom

  1. Put all ingredients in a large bowl and mix well. Let set a few minutes, then you can add ice and drink immediately. Store the rest in glass jars in the refrig. If you use fresh ginger, strain as you pour the switchel into your glass.
  2. For a more fizzy feel, with probiotic benefits, carefully pour the mixture into large glass bottles, preferably the ones with wire and ball stoppers. Fasten lids and leave the bottles on the counter for at least 2-3 days (up to a week or 2 in cooler weather). Refrigerate. When serving, open slowly in the sink in case the switchel “pops” out of the bottle. Again, strain if fresh ginger was used. Cheers!

Potato

December 12, 2016

The potato is one vegetable that is abundant throughout the year. It comes in many varieties. Though called “Irish”, the white potato is native to the mountains of tropical America from Chile to Mexico, and was widely cultivated in South America at the time of the Spanish Conquest. The Spaniards introduced the potato into Europe early in the sixteenth century, and it was Sir Walter Raleigh who showed England how to eat the potato with beef gravy. He, too, started the potato fad in colonial Virginia, but it was Sir Francis Drake who was supposed to have brought the potato to Ireland. The potato soon became second only to Indian corn as the most important food contribution of the Americas, and is now one of the most valuable vegetable crops in the world.

The potato is classed as a protective vegetable because of its high vitamin C content. It has been noted in the past that, as the potato became common, scurvy, which is prevalent where vitamin C is absent, became uncommon, and soon disappeared almost entirely in potato-eating countries.

If we had to confine ourselves to one food, the potato is the one on which we could live almost indefinitely, exclusive of other foods, as it is a complete food in itself. It was Professor Hinhede of Denmark, a food scientist during the last war, who proved to the world that a person could live on potatoes for a long period of time without any depreciation of body energy. In fact he and his assistant lived three years solely on potatoes-raw and cooked. He not only proved the potato to be a complete food, but he also showed how inexpensive a diet it was at a cost of approximately only six cents a day. It is good, however, to eat potatoes with other vegetables; eating them by themselves may eventually cause constipation.

When selecting potatoes make sure they are smooth, shallow-eyed, and reasonably unblemished. Avoid the extra large .potato as it may have a hollow or pithy center. Potatoes with a slight green color are sunburned and may have developed a bitter taste.

The energy value of the potato is approximately the same as bread, but it is a far better balanced food than bread, particularly in its content of potassium, iron, and vitamins C, B1 , and G. The potato is also lower in calories. Because potatoes are a starchy food, they put less work on the kidneys.

It is best to eat potatoes in as raw a form as possible. However, raw, cut potatoes should be eaten as soon as they are cut, as their oxidation is very rapid. I know of no other food that will turn green, ferment, and break down quicker than potatoes will when they have been juiced.

Potatoes may be sliced raw and used in salads. Juice them, mixed with parsley, beets, or other vegetables for flavor. Potato juice is . a great rejuvenator and is a quick way to get an abundance of vitamin C as well as other vitamins and minerals. Why not munch on a raw potato? It is no more peculiar for a child to eat a piece of raw potato than it is for him to eat a raw apple.

Instead of throwing away the potato peeling, eat it, because it is rich in mineral elements. At least 60 percent of the potassium contained in the potato lies so close to the skin that it cannot be saved if the potato is peeled. Furthermore, potassium is a salt, and you do not need to salt potatoes if the potato peelings are used. If you feel you need more seasoning, use a mineral broth powder (dehydrated vegetables) instead of table salt. Even using sweet butter in place of salted butter is better, and is not difficult to get used to when the flavor is enhanced with the addition of broth powder.

There are numerous ways to prepare and serve potatoes. They have a bland flavor, so they can be used frequently in meals. It is best to cook potatoes on a low heat, if possible, and if they are not baked they should be cooked in a vapor-sealed vessel to retain their goodness. The art of cooking can be used to build or to destroy.

It is necessary that we realize the difference between a properly steamed potato and a boiled potato-one is alkaline and the other is acid. According to the Bureau of Home Economics, United States Department of Agriculture, when ordinary cooking methods are used, from 32 to 76 percent of the essential food values, minerals, and vitamins are lost due to oxidation, or are destroyed by heat or dissolved in water. In a vapor-sealed utensil, oxidation is practically eliminated, less heat is required, and waterless cooking is possible . The vitamins and minerals are preserved for you and are not carried away by escaping steam.

The outside of the potato is the positive side. The negative side is the inside. The inside is carbohydrate and is acid in body reaction. So, it is best, when making alkalinizing broths for example, that you discard the center of the potato before adding the potato to the broth ingredients. Throw this part of the potato into your garden if you have one and it will do its part to rebuild the soil.

In preparing potatoes for cooking, scrub and wash them thoroughly. Use a stiff brush to remove the dirt. To bake, drop them first in very hot water to heat them, then rub them with oil to keep their skins from getting too hard in the process of baking and to help them be more easily digested. Remember to bake them at a slow oven heat. In the last five minutes of baking raise the oven heat to about 400°F to break down the starch grains.

Before serving baked potatoes, they may be cut in half, scooped out, and mashed with nut butter, avocado, or a little grated cheese. Garnish with parsley or chives. Or, take plain, baked potatoes, split open, and serve with a Roquefort, cream, and chive dressing.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Potatoes leave an alkaline ash in the body, are low in roughage, and may be used in the treatment of acidosis. They can also be used for catarrhal conditions.

When trying to overcome catarrhal conditions, cut the potato peeling about a half-inch thick and use it in broth or soup, cooking very little. The resulting broth will contain many important mineral elements.

Potato soup can also be used to great advantage in cases of uric acid, kidney, and stomach disorders, and for replacing minerals in the system. To make potato soup, peel six potatoes, making sure the peelings are about three-quarters of an inch thick. Place in water in a covered kettle and simmer twenty minutes. Add celery to change the flavor if desired. Add okra powder if the stomach is irritated.

The potassium in the potato is strongly alkaline, which makes for good liver activation, elastic tissues, and supple muscles. It also produces body grace and a good disposition. Potassium is the ”healer” of the body and is very necessary in rejuvenation. It is good heart element also, and potatoes can be used very well in all cases of heart troubles.

Anyone with ailments on the left side of the body-the negative side, or the heart and intestinal side of the body-can use carbohydrates that are negative in character. Potatoes are one of the best negative foods to use for building up the left side of the body.

To use an old remedy, take slices of potatoes and use as a pack over any congested part of the body. This type of pack draws out static, toxic material, or venous congestion in any part of the body. Use a narrow, thumb-shaped piece of potato to help correct hemorrhoid conditions.

To control diarrhea, cook potato soup with milk. The milk controls the diarrhea-it has a constipating effect, if boiled. The potato adds bulk, which is also necessary to control this trouble.

The raw potato juice is one of the most volatile juices and the strongest juice that can be taken into the body. It is used in many cases of intestinal disorders, as well as for rejuvenation.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (raw and pared)

Calories 279

Protein 7.6g

Fat 0.4g

Carbohydrates 6.8g

Calcium 26mg

Phosphorus 195mg

Iron 2.7g

Vitamin A trace

Thiamine 0.40mg

Riboflavin 0.15mg

Niacin 4.4 mg

Ascorbic acid 64mg

Grapefruit

December 5, 2016

The name grapefruit originated in the West Indies in the eighteenth century, perhaps because of the fact that its fruit grows in clusters of three to twelve or more, similar to grape clusters. This citrus fruit was cultivated more than 4000 years ago in India and Malaysia, but it was not until the sixteenth century that it was introduced to this country by the Spaniards. For many years it was not popular because of its slightly bitter taste. From 1880 to 1885 a group of Florida grapefruit growers shipped crates of the fruit to Philadelphia and New York and encouraged people to try it. In about 1915 the commercial sale of grapefruit expanded, until its production spread into three other states—California, Arizona, and Texas.

The United States furnishes about 97 percent of the world’s supply of grapefruit, and Florida and Texas together produce about 90 percent of the grapefruit grown in the United States. The Marsh seedless grapefruit is the most popular variety today.

The grapefruit tree is about the size of the orange tree and reaches a height of twenty to forty feet. Like the orange, it blooms in the spring. In California and Arizona, the fruit ripens throughout the year. Although grapefruit is available all year, it is most abundant from January through May. Grapefruit is also imported by the United States from Cuba in the late summer and early fall.

Grapefruit of good quality is firm, but springy to the touch, well-shaped, and heavy for its size—the heavier the fruit, the better. Do not choose soft, wilted, or flabby fruit. The heavy fruits are usually thin-skinned and contain more juice than those with coarse skin or those puffy or spongy to the touch.

Grapefruit often has a reddish brown color over the normal yellow, which is called “russeting.” Russeting does not affect the flavor in any way. Most of the defects found on the skin of the grapefruit are minor and do not affect the eating quality of the fruit. However, fruit with decayed spots is not desirable, as the decay usually affects the flavor. Decay may appear as a soft, discolored area on the stem end of the fruit or it may appear as a colorless area that breaks easily when pressure is applied. If the skin of the fruit appears rough, ridged, or wrinkled, it is likely to be thick-skinned.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Grapefruit is a subtropical acid fruit, and is highly alkaline in reaction. It is best eaten with other acid fruits, nuts, or milk. Eat grapefruit immediately after cutting into the rind to benefit from all of its goodness. For best digestion and assimilation, avoid eating grapefruit with sweeter fruits or with starches. The grapefruit is less acidulous than the lemon and is a good substitute when oranges or their juice cannot be tolerated, or when the alkaline reserves in the body need to be augmented.

Grapefruit is rich in vitamins C and B1, and is a good source of vitamin B12. It is low in calories, which makes it a good drink on a reducing diet. There is less sugar in grapefruit than in oranges. Eat the sun-ripened fruit when possible, as this fruit needs no sweetening, and is better for you. If sweetening is necessary, use a little honey.

Grapefruit is very rich in citric acids and their salts, and in potassium and calcium. Use it often in combination with meats, because grapefruit juice is excellent as an aid in the digestion of meats. However, avoid the overuse of all citric acid fruits as they are a powerful dissolver of the catarrhal accumulations in the body and the elimination of too much toxic material all at once may cause boils, irritated nerves, diarrhea, and other problems. People are often so eager to get vitamins and minerals into the body that they sometimes do not consider that the powerful action of citric acid causes irritation and discomfort.

When taken right before bedtime, grapefruit is conducive to a sound sleep. A drink of grapefruit juice first thing in the morning helps prevent constipation. It is also an excellent aid in reducing fevers from colds and the flu, and seldom causes allergic reactions.

Grapefruit rind contains the very valuable vitamin P, which is an important vitamin for healthy gums and teeth. This vitamin may be extracted by simmering the rind in water for about twenty minutes. Strain, and drink.

The sour taste of grapefruit increases the flow of digestive juices in the stomach. Grapefruit served at the beginning of a meal stimulates the appetite and helps in digestion.

This fruit is also good for any hardening of body tissue, such as hardening of the liver and the arteries. It can also help prevent stone formations.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 133

Protein: 1.5 g

Fat: 0.6 g

Carbohydrates: 30.3 g

Calcium: 51 mg

Phosphorus: 54 mg

Iron: 0.9 mg

Vitamin A: 4770 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.11 mg

Riboflavin: 0.06 mg

Niacin: 0.06 mg

Ascorbic acid: 12 mg

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