Foundation for Advancement in Cancer Therapy

Non-Traditional Approaches to
the Theories, Treatments and Prevention of Cancer

Asparagus

February 27, 2017

The ancient Phoenicians brought asparagus to the Greeks and Romans. It was described in the sixteenth century by the English writer Evelyn as “sperage,” and he said that it was “delicious eaten raw with oil and vinegar”.

When selecting asparagus, choose spears that are fresh, firm, and tender (not woody or pithy), with tips that are tightly closed. Watch for signs of decay, such as rot and mold. If the tip of the spear appears wilted, the asparagus is really too old to be good. From the tip to all but an inch of the base, the stalk should be tender. Angular stalks indicate that they are tough and stringy.

Store asparagus wrapped in a damp cloth or waxed paper, and keep refrigerated until you are ready to use it. Asparagus loses its edible quality when it is subjected to dryness and heat, which reduce the sugar content and increase the fiber content.

Asparagus is a perennial herb, and is a member of the Lily of the Valley family. It can be served hot, with drawn butter; cold, in a salad; in soups; and as a sandwich filling or flavoring.

The season for asparagus is February through July, and the peak months are April, May, and June. Early spring asparagus is from California; late spring asparagus is shipped in early April or late May from Maryland, Delaware, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, Michigan, Illinois, and Iowa. Green asparagus is the most nutritious. Some varieties are green-tipped with white butts, and some are entirely white. Most of the white variety is canned.

Asparagus is best when cooked in stainless steel, on low heat. This leaves the shoots tender and retains their original color. If cooked with the tips up, more vitamin B1 and C will be preserved. The liquid can be saved and used in vegetable cocktails.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Asparagus acts as a general stimulant to the kidneys, but can be irritating to the kidneys if taken in excess or if there is extreme kidney inflammation. Because it contains chlorophyll, it is a good blood builder.

Green asparagus tips are high in vitamin A, while the white tips have almost none. This food leaves an alkaline ash in the body. Because they have a lot of roughage, only the tips can be used in a soft diet. They are high in water content and are considered a good vegetable in an elimination diet. Many of the elements that build the liver, kidneys, skin, ligaments, and bones are found in green asparagus. Green asparagus also helps in the formation of red blood corpuscles.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 90

Protein: 7.5g

Fat: .7g

Carbohydrates: 13.1g

Calcium: 71mg

Phosphorus: 211mg

Iron: 3.11mg

Vitamin A: 3,430 I.U.

Thiamine: .54mg

Riboflavin: .59mg

Niacin: 3.9mg

Ascorbic Acid: 113mg

Persimmon

February 20, 2017

For centuries Japan and China have been growing the Oriental or Japanese persimmon. It is probably native to China, since it was introduced to Japan from that country. The Japanese consider it their national fruit but it is more properly called Oriental rather than Japanese persimmon, since it is not native to Japan. Commodore Perry’s expedition, which opened Japan to world commerce in 1852, is credited with the introduction of this fruit to the United States.

The persimmon that is native to the United States grows wild in the East from Connecticut to Florida, and in the West from Texas to Kansas. This persimmon is much smaller than the Oriental, but has richer flesh. The wild fruit grows in sufficient abundance to satisfy local demand, and little or no shipping is done.

In general, persimmons that have dark-colored flesh are always sweet and non-astringent and may be eaten before they become too soft. Varieties with light-colored flesh, with the exception of the Fuyu variety, are astringent until they soften. The astringency is due to the presence of a large amount of tannin, the same substance found in tea. As the fruit ripens and sweetens the tannin disappears. Ripening can take place just as well off the tree as on.

The Japanese remove the “pucker” from persimmons by placing them in casks that have been used for sake, or Japanese liquor. Allowing persimmons to sweeten naturally will remove the “pucker,” or tannin.

The season for persimmons is October through December, and the peak month is November. Almost all commercial shipments originate in California. The Hachiya is the largest and handsomest oriental variety grown in this country. As a rule, California produces a seedless variety, but the Hachiya grown in Florida has one or more seeds. The Hachiya fruit is cone-shaped and terminates in a black point. The skin is a glossy, deep, orange-red and the flesh is deep yellow, astringent until soft, but sweet and rich when ripe. The Tanenashi is the more important variety in the southeastern states. There are many other varieties that are grown commercially.

Good quality fruit is well-shaped, plump, smooth, and highly colored. The skin is unbroken and the stem cap is attached. Ripeness is usually indicated by softness.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

When thoroughly ripe, persimmons are a rich source of fruit sugar. Dried persimmons are almost as sweet as candy. They are rich in potassium, magnesium, and phosphorus, and are good to use in a soft diet.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 286

Protein: 2.6 g

Fat: 1.8 g

Carbohydrates: 73 g

Calcium: 26 mg

Phosphorus: 97 mg

Iron: 1.3 mg

Vitamin A: 10,080 I.U.

Thiamine: .11 mg

Riboflavin: .08 mg

Niacin: .4 mg

Ascorbic acid: 48 mg

Passion Fruit

February 13, 2017

While the origin of the Passion Fruit plant is unknown, it is generally believed to be native to Brazil where 16th Century Spanish Catholics named it “Flor de las cinco llagas” or “flower of the five wounds” after its distinctive purple flower. Today, about 400 years later, passion fruit is grown nearly everywhere in the tropical belt but known by a variety of different names. Its common name is Maracuya in Ecuador and Brazil, Parcha in Venezuela, Lilikoi in Hawaii, and Chinola or Parchita in Puerto Rico.

Botanically this exotic fruit belongs to the family of Passifloraceae, of the genus Passiflora. Scientific name: Passiflora edulis. The plant is an avid climber (vine) which grows on anything it can grab through tendrils.

Passion Fruit was introduced into Hawaii in 1880 and it quickly became popular in home gardens. It naturalized in Hawaii’s almost perfect climate and, by 1930, could be found wild on all the islands of the Hawaiian chain. In 1951, the University of Hawaii chose passion fruit as the most promising crop for agricultural development and undertook a program to create an industry for production of quick-frozen passion fruit juice concentrate. By 1958 the plantings had expanded to cover 490 hectares and the industry was rather well established.

Long-term success was not to be however. Viruses damaging the vines, high labor costs, and the rapidly increasing value of land combined to wipe out this young industry. Today, there are no more commercial passion fruit plantations left in Hawaii but the fruit’s unique flavor remains deeply rooted in the taste preferences of the Hawaiian people. Large quantities of passion fruit juice and concentrate are shipped to Hawaii every year. It is thought, as a matter of fact, that Hawaii may well have the highest per capita consumption of passion fruit juice in the world.

Australia is another area of high passion fruit consumption, again, due to history and familiarity. Passion fruit flourished there before 1900 in what had been banana fields. It attained great importance until 1943 when the vines were devastated by a widespread virus. Although some plantations have been rebuilt, they can not produce enough passion fruit to satisfy the demand and imports make up the balance.

It is in South America that most of the world’s passion fruit is currently grown. Starting in the mid 1950’s, passion fruit cultivation became widespread in Colombia and Venezuela. Later it spread to Ecuador. Today, South America, and particularly Ecuador, is the main exporter of passion fruit concentrate to the Western World.

When compared to huge crops like banana (estimated 45 million MT per year), the production of passion fruit is miniscule…only an estimated 640,000 MT. The market for fresh fruit is almost nonexistent in the U.S. although this may change as consumers reach out for new, different, and more exotic fruit and produce. In Brazil however, fresh passion fruit is immensely popular. The demand is so strong that although they grow much of their own fruit, they have had to import additional supplies, primarily from Ecuador, in recent years. In Brazil, the fruit is used in fresh beverages made both at home and in “stalls” or juice stands popular throughout the country.

The passiflora plant requires well-drained fertile soil and good moisture to flourish. It grows quickly and reaches about 15-20 feet per annum once established. Its average life span is about 5-7 years.

Over five hundred cultivate types exist; however, two main type purple and yellow passion fruits are widely cultivated. During each season, the vine bears greenish-white fragrant flowers. The fruit features round to oval shape, 4 to 8 centimeters in diameter, have a tough shell mangosteen-like rind. Average weight is about 35-50 g.

Inside, the fruit consists of membranous sacs containing light orange-colored, pulpy juice with numerous small, hard, dark-brown or black, pitted seeds. Yellow passions are generally larger than the purple varieties, but the pulp of the purple fruit is less acid, richer in aroma and flavor, and has a higher proportion of juicy pulp.

Because of its unique, intense, aromatic flavor characteristics, passion fruit is a “natural” ingredient for juice blends. It has also been described as a natural concentrate and it blends so well with other juice flavors. In Germany, one of the largest juice consuming countries in the world, passion fruit concentrate and banana puree constitute the base of almost every “multivitamin” juice produced. These “multivitamin” juices are second only to apple juice in popularity among Germans.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Delicious, passion fruit is rich source of antioxidants, minerals, vitamins and fiber. 100 g fruit contains about 97 calories.

The fruit is a very good source of dietary fiber. 100 g fruit pulp contains 10.4 g or 27% of fiber. Good fiber in the diet helps remove cholesterol from the body. In addition dietary insoluble fiber by acting as a bulk laxative helps protect the colon mucous membrane by decreasing exposure time to toxic substances in the colon as well as binding to cancer-causing chemicals in the colon.

Passion fruit is good in vitamin C, providing about 30 mg per 100 g. Vitamin-C (ascorbic acid) is a powerful water soluble anti-oxidant. Consumption of fruits rich in vitamin C helps the body develop resistance against flu-like infectious agents and scavenge harmful, pro-inflammatory free radicals.

The fruit contains very good levels of vitamin-A (provides about 1274 IU per 100 g), and flavonoid antioxidants such as β-carotene and cryptoxanthin-β. Current research studies suggest that these compounds have antioxidant properties, and along with vitamin A are essential for good eye-sight.

Vitamin A is also required maintaining healthy mucus membranes and skin. Consumption of natural fruits rich in vitamin-A, and flavonoids helps to protect from lung and oral cavity cancers.

Fresh granadilla is very rich in potassium. 100 g fruit pulp has about 348 mg of potassium. Potassium is an important component of cells and body fluids, and helps regulate heart rate and blood pressure. Granadilla is also a very good source of minerals. Iron, copper, magnesium and phosphorus are present in adequate amounts in the fruit.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE FRUIT

Calories: 229

Protein: 2.2 g

Fat: 28 mg

Carbohydrates: 4.2g

Calcium: 28 mg

Phosphorus: 160 mg

Iron: 3.78

Vitamin A: 3002 IU

Thiamine: trace

Riboflavin: .307 mg

Niacin: 3.54 mg

Ascorbic acid: 30 mg

Rethinking Cancer Newsletter #60

February 12, 2017

Filed under: Rethinking Cancer Newsletters — ggrieser @ 11:10 am

Here’s some good news from the last U.S. election:

  • Sonoma County, California passed a GMO crop ban, creating the largest GMO-free zone in the U.S
  • San Francisco, Oakland and Albany, California plus Boulder, Colorado voted to tax junk, sugar-laden Big Soda products.
  • Arkansas, Florida, North Dakota and Montana approved medical marijuana initiatives, making that 29 states and Washington D.C. with varying restrictions.

    And other good news:

  • The National Organic Standards Board (NOSB) voted to remove carrageenan, a potent inflammatory agent and possible carcinogen, from the list of approved additives in organic food.
  • Mirabile dictu! The New York Times recently cited studies showing that good food, including whole fat dairy, was an effective treatment for acne! When FACT began 45 years ago, the idea that food could be a protocol for healing anything was a joke to most conventionally-trained doctors. Over the years, we’ve seen acknowledgement of denatured, sugar/chemical-laden foods as disease-causing, acceptance of good food as disease prevention, as well as the use of certain active ingredients in plants as templates for drugs, but the idea that “food is your best medicine” for the ailing has generally been consigned to the bin of wistful Hippocrates zealots. This may seem like a lot of “duh” to those of us who live the nontoxic Biorepair approach to health and healing. We know that the skin is a window on what’s going on inside – get the bad stuff out, put the good stuff in and the skin will reflect that with a glow. Still, let’s hope that, perhaps, just perhaps, when it comes to other chronic conditions, this acne cure will inspire some sort of awakening in the orthodox symptom/drug-oriented medical community. Imagine a world where food, not drugs, is in the vanguard of healing.

Rejoice in the good stuff and have a great holiday season!

To your health!
Foundation for Advancement in Cancer Therapy (F.A.C.T.)

P.S. Don’t forget to check out our film, Rethinking Cancer, now streaming on iTunes in North America, UK, Ireland, British Virgin Islands, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Thailand, France, Belgium, Luxembourg, Spain, and more coming soon. Spread the word! FACT is a non-profit, so your support makes it all possible. Thanks so much and do join us on TwitterFacebook and our YouTube channel!

Why Dirt Makes Us Happy

For centuries people have been finding solace and joy futzing around in their gardens. Now, in the 21st Century, science has figured out why.

Researchers have long theorized that the sharp rise in autoimmune conditions, like asthma and allergies, could stem from living too clean (the “hygiene hypothesis”). The idea is that routine exposure to harmless microorganisms in the environment, like soil bacteria, strengthens our immune system and trains it to ignore benign molecules like pollen or hairs on a neighbor’s cat. A series of studies reported in Neuroscience took this hypothesis a step further by treating depression with a specific soil bacterium, Mycobacterium vaccae. They found, for example, that lung cancer patients injected with killed M. vaccae reported better quality of life and less nausea and pain. The injections also eased skin allergies in other patients. Additional studies have shown promise with M. vaccae in improving cognitive function, Crohn’s disease and even rheumatoid arthritis. READ MORE

What Do Those Food Labels Mean?

Nowadays, trendy restaurants and food stores know that customers are partial to foods that are healthier for humans and the environment than the typical “factory” fare.  So, perhaps you’ve noticed that more and more menus are adorned with terms like “grass-fed” or “pasture-raised” steak, “organic” seafood, “free-range” chicken. These labels sound nice, but what do they really mean? Here are some common terms you might encounter and what you might want to read between the lines: READ MORE

Pot for Pets

Now that medical marijuana (cannabis sativa) is legal in 29 U.S. states and the District of Columbia, perhaps it’s not surprising that humans are not the only ones experiencing the therapeutic virtues of this age-old plant.

Animal lovers who may or may not partake of marijuana themselves, are turning to cannabis-based products to alleviate a host of their pets’ maladies, including seizures, inflammation, anxiety and pain, arthritis, loss of appetite and nausea – and they are reporting impressive results. Moreover, the treatments are being used not only for cats and dogs, but also pigs, horses, and domesticated wild animals. READ MORE

Jolly Jam Cookies

  • 1 cup raw almonds, ground
  • 1 1/4 cup spelt flour or other low-gluten flour (e.g., kamut, amaranth, barley, rice)
  • 1 cup rolled oats
  • 1/3 cup organic pure maple syrup
  • 1/2 cup unrefined coconut oil
  • fruit jam – homemade or from the health food store
  • 2 tablespoons (preferably distilled) water
  1. Mix the dry ingredients in a large bowl.
  2. Add wet ingredients (maple syrup, melted coconut oil, water) and blend well.
  3. Shape the cookie dough into walnut-sized balls and place them on parchment paper on a baking sheet. Indent with thumb and fill with the fruit jam.Shape the cookie dough

Bake at 350 F. about 16-20 minutes – until golden brown. To store, place in a jar or other container with a few pieces of orange or lemon peel to keep fresh, though chances are these cookies won’t be stored for long!

*Great thanks to Eileen B. and daughter, Melissa, on Long Island, NY, for sending us this delicious holiday recipe!

 

Asparagus

February 7, 2017

The ancient Phoenicians brought asparagus to the Greeks and Romans. It was described in the sixteenth century by the English writer Evelyn as “sperage,” and he said that it was “delicious eaten raw with oil and vinegar”.

When selecting asparagus, choose spears that are fresh, firm, and tender (not woody or pithy), with tips that are tightly closed. Watch for signs of decay, such as rot and mold. If the tip of the spear appears wilted, the asparagus is really too old to be good. From the tip to all but an inch of the base, the stalk should be tender. Angular stalks indicate that they are tough and stringy.

Store asparagus wrapped in a damp cloth or waxed paper, and keep refrigerated until you are ready to use it. Asparagus loses its edible quality when it is subjected to dryness and heat, which reduce the sugar content and increase the fiber content.

Asparagus is a perennial herb, and is a member of the Lily of the Valley family. It can be served hot, with drawn butter; cold, in a salad; in soups; and as a sandwich filling or flavoring.

The season for asparagus is February through July, and the peak months are April, May, and June. Early spring asparagus is from California; late spring asparagus is shipped in early April or late May from Maryland, Delaware, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, Michigan, Illinois, and Iowa. Green asparagus is the most nutritious. Some varieties are green-tipped with white butts, and some are entirely white. Most of the white variety is canned.

Asparagus is best when cooked in stainless steel, on low heat. This leaves the shoots tender and retains their original color. If cooked with the tips up, more vitamin B1 and C will be preserved. The liquid can be saved and used in vegetable cocktails.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Asparagus acts as a general stimulant to the kidneys, but can be irritating to the kidneys if taken in excess or if there is extreme kidney inflammation. Because it contains chlorophyll, it is a good blood builder.

Green asparagus tips are high in vitamin A, while the white tips have almost none. This food leaves an alkaline ash in the body. Because they have a lot of roughage, only the tips can be used in a soft diet. They are high in water content and are considered a good vegetable in an elimination diet. Many of the elements that build the liver, kidneys, skin, ligaments, and bones are found in green asparagus. Green asparagus also helps in the formation of red blood corpuscles.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 90

Protein: 7.5g

Fat: .7g

Carbohydrates: 13.1g

Calcium: 71mg

Phosphorus: 211mg

Iron: 3.11mg

Vitamin A: 3,430 I.U.

Thiamine: .54mg

Riboflavin: .59mg

Niacin: 3.9mg

Ascorbic Acid: 113mg

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