Foundation for Advancement in Cancer Therapy

Non-Traditional Approaches to
the Theories, Treatments and Prevention of Cancer

Pineapple

April 24, 2017

Pineapples were cultivated in the West Indies long before Columbus visited there. But after his voyage to the island of Guadeloupe, it was recorded in Spain that Columbus had “discovered” the fruit. The pineapple is native to tropical America and was known to the Indians as na-na, meaning fragrance, and to the Spanish explorers as piiia, because of its resemblance to a pine cone.

History does not record how pineapples first reached Hawaii. For many years they grew wild. Then, a young Bostonian started commercial production of them there in 1901 on twelve acres of land. His company has enlarged to the present 25,000 acres. The plant of this fruit grows from two to four feet high, with a rosette of stiff, sword-shaped leaves growing from its base. Out of the rosette center grows a single, fleshy, scaly-coated fruit that is four to ten inches long. A cluster of sword-shaped leaves surmounts the fruit.

Pineapples are grown in many parts of the world, but the United States is supplied principally from Cuba, Mexico, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico. They may be obtained all year long, but are most abundant from March through July. The peak months are June and July.

A ripe pineapple in quality condition has a fresh, clean appearance, a distinctive darkish orange-yellow color, and a decided fragrance. The “eyes” of the fruit are flat and almost hollow. If the fruit is mature it is usually heavier in proportion to its size. To test for ripeness, pull at the spikes. If they pull out easily, the fruit is ripe; discolored areas, or soft spots, are an indication of bruised fruit.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

High in vitamin C, the pineapple is considered to be a protective fruit. It is wonderful for constipation and poor digestion. The pineapple helps digest proteins, and can be used in elimination diets. It leaves an alkaline ash in the body. Pineapple is thought to have a certain amount of iodine because it grows near the ocean. When buying canned pineapple, make sure it is unsweetened. Pineapple goes well with fruit and nuts, and is good to eat on a fruit diet.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories 123

Protein 1g

Fat 0.5g

Carbohydrates 33g

Calcium 39mg Niacin 0.5mg

Phosphorus 19mg Ascorbic acid 40mg

Iron 1.2mg

Vitamin A: 170 I.U.

Thiamine 0.20mg

Mushroom

April 17, 2017

The Pharaohs of Egypt monopolized mushrooms for their own use. They thought they were too delicate to be eaten by common people. The Egyptian potentates did not understand the sudden, overnight appearance of mushrooms, and consequently believed they grew magically. By the first century B.C., the mushroom had gained such a fine reputation among epicures of the Roman Empire that the poet Horace celebrated its goodness in verse. The Romans called mushrooms “food of the gods”, and served them on festive occasions. They were thought to provide warriors with unusual strength.

Up to the seventeenth century, only the wild types of mushrooms found growing in meadows and pastures were known. During the reign of Louis XIV, mushroom · growing was introduced in France. Parisian market gardeners experimented to learn the secrets of successful mushroom culture. By 1749 mushroom beds were cultivated in caves and cellars, and the results were much better’ than ·when they were grown outdoors. The British were raising mushrooms in hothouses sometime before 1700.

The commercial production of mushrooms in the United States started in the late 1890s when a group of florists in Chester County, Pennsylvania started growing them under the benches in their greenhouses. The greatest event in the history of mushroom culture in the United States occurred in 1926 when a farmer found a clump of pure white mushrooms in a bed of uniformly cream-colored fungi. Most of the mushrooms grown today are descendants of this white clump.

Mushrooms are now cultivated in specially constructed buildings that are windowless and in which temperature and humidity are controlled. Mushroom spawn is cultivated by laboratory scientists who sell it to the growers for inoculation of the mushroom beds. Such precise methods are necessary to provide pure spawn of known characteristics.

The introduction of mushrooms into gravies, sauces, soups, and other dishes adds zest and flavor, but they also are a fine food when served as a vegetable . Mushrooms require very little preparation. Wash, cut off the bottom portion of the stem if it has dried, and either slice the caps and stems or leave whole, depending on the method of cooking. Butter a deep pan, cut up the mushrooms so they fill the pan to a depth of about two inches, and simmer over a low· heat until the mushrooms are covered with their own juice. This may take more than ten minutes. Then, cook more briskly for about five minutes, until tender. Overcooking toughens mushrooms.

Green plants can get their food by manufacturing it in their leaves from air, water, sunshine , and soil nutrients, but mushrooms cannot do this. They have no leaves, so they must depend on green plants to make their food for them, and they cannot use it unless it is in the process of decay. Mushrooms propagate from spores, a brownish powder shed from the rounded head which, when ripe, opens like a parasol. However, cultivated mushrooms are not reproduced from spores, but from fine strands of mycelium, which are root like growths that spread through organic material. Most wild mushrooms are not poisonous, but unless you know the difference, you should leave them alone. It is not possible to tell by taste which mushrooms are dangerous. Some very unpalatable mushrooms are harmless, while others that have an agreeable taste are poisonous.

Scientists today say that darkness is not the primary requisite for growing mushrooms. They say that, for healthy growth, all mushrooms need constant temperature and protection against drafts.

The term mushroom refers to a large number of different species and varieties of fleshy fungi. Only one species is usually cultivated and that is Agaricus Campestris, which has a straight stem, a smooth cap of a shade varying from white or ivory to brown, and gills of different shades of pink. Most of the cultivated mushrooms grown in the United States are of the white variety variously known as Snow White, White King, White Queen, etc. This variety is very prolific and is preferred by nearly all markets because of its attractive, clean, white appearance.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Prior to the mid-1940s, all you needed to do to work up a hot argument among nutritionists was to say the word “mushrooms.” Scientists’ assertions about the food value of mushrooms ranged from calling them’ ‘vegetable beefsteak” full of proteins, to declaring that they had no protein and very little else. This confusion arose partly from the fact that mushrooms of many species were investigated and the results reported under a common head. A June 1946 report by William B. Eccelen, Jr. and Carl R. Fellers of the Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment Station stated that cultivated mushrooms of the Agaricus Campestris type compare favorably in food value to many fresh fruits and vegetables.

Mushrooms are among the few rich organic sources of germanium, which increases oxygen efficiency of the body, counteracts the effects of pollutants, and increases resistance to disease. Because mushrooms are extremely low in calories, they are useful in reducing diets. They are also a good source of vitamin B.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 123

Protein: 11.9 g

Fat: 1.2 g

Carbohydrates: 19.4 g

Calcium: 26 mg

Phosphorus: 510 mg

Iron: 3.5 mg

Vitamin A: trace

Thiamine: 0.41 mg

Riboflavin: 2.02 mg

Niacin: 18.6 mg

Ascorbic acid: 14 mg

Rethinking Cancer Newsletter #61

April 12, 2017

Filed under: Rethinking Cancer Newsletters — ggrieser @ 5:08 pm

Welcome to our 46th year! Things have changed a lot since Ruth Sackman and her husband, Leon, co-founded FACT in 1971. In those days, cancer was a very hush-hush, almost taboo topic. Even the idea of putting the word “cancer” in the name of the organization, as Ruth did, was considered very bold and possibly risky. Doctors who dared to treat patients with nutritional therapies, i.e., not the legally sanctioned surgery, chemo, radiation, could be raided and/or jailed.  Alternative practitioners warned their patients never to say they were being treated for cancer, rather just trying to improve diet and overall health.

Today cancer is at epidemic levels and everybody’s talking about it. Many have seen the failure and suffering wrought by the “legal” treatments (all focused on destroying cancer cells rather than the repair and strengthening of the body) and there are far more resources openly supporting unconventional approaches (though conventional treatments are still the only legally sanctioned modalities). The alternative health movement is booming — over $30 billion in profits last year. But with commercial success, there have also come a lot of questionable resources, the lack of clinical experience, the touting of ineffective, sometimes harmful new miraculous cures, superfoods, supplements and the like.

As a nonprofit educational organization, we have no vested interest in the alternative health industry. Our role is to give you the facts as we’ve learned them over many years of experience with a wide range of patients, clinicians, therapies and facilities. As you may have noticed, we don’t focus just on cancer. Cancer is the end result of a long process of unnatural living, avoidable and sometimes unavoidable toxic exposures, overstressed lifestyle, etc. We believe that cancer can be managed — and in most cases prevented — by learning to make wise lifestyle choices compatible with this fast-paced 21st Century world. We seek to give you overarching principles that will help you make sense of the deluge of information and misinformation out there.

In short, we want you to be your best doctor.

To your health!
Foundation for Advancement in Cancer Therapy (F.A.C.T.)

P.S. Thanks so much for all your input. If you feel the information you receive here is of value, we hope you’ll consider any sort of (tax-deductible in the U.S.) donation. And do check out our film on iTunes  and keep in touch on TwitterFacebook and our YouTube channel!

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Are Germs Really the Problem?
By Ruth Sackman, Co-founder and Former President of FACT

There is a school of thought about germs that differs radically from the germ theory of disease based on the work of Louis Pasteur (1822-1895). And Pasteur’s germ theory is what most of our medical care today is based on.

Pasteur believed that germs were the cause of disease and, therefore, the primary goal of treatment should be their elimination. But at about the same time that Pasteur was propagating his theory, a highly respected chemist-physician-biologist, Dr. Antoine Bechamp (1816-1908), along with others, strongly disagreed. Their views, though logical, were obscured by the more exciting presentation by Pasteur, whose talent for self-promotion, some have posited, far exceeded his scientific investigatory skills. Read More

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An Herbal First Aid Kit

Herbal medicine is the oldest and still most widely used system of healing in the world today. Preparations, made exclusively from plants (seeds, roots, stems, flowers, leaves),  may be put into many forms — tinctures, extracts, teas, salves, etc. When used appropriately, these remedies can be highly effective, relatively inexpensive and minus the toxic side effects of synthetic pharmaceutical meds. Here are some suggestions for your home herbal first aid kit: Read More

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Blue Light — Something Else to Worry About?

Cavemen had plenty of things to worry about — lions, bears, starvation….. Today, in the digital age, we’ve got a different set of anxieties. One that is coming more and more into the spotlight is blue light.

Before the advent of artificial lighting, the circadian rhythms of all living things — the natural 24-hour wakefulness and sleep cycle which affects many biological processes — were attuned to the major source of light: the sun. People spent their evenings in relative darkness, a time of rest and recuperation, and rose with the morning sun, energized for the challenges of daily survival. But today, our evenings are filled with manmade illumination. Too often we are up at all hours and the rhythms of our bodies are all jangled up in pursuits no caveman could have fathomed. Read More

Kale Chips

Should you be eating all vegetables raw every chance you get? No, actually. Contrary to the belief of many smoothie/salad afficionados, kale, for example, is not a good choice for raw eating. A little is okay, of course, but overloading on this, as has become, for many today, almost a religion, can create thyroid problems. A member of the cruciferous family, kale contains goitgrogens that interfere with the formation of thyroid hormone, especially in people with iodine deficiency. Gentle cooking above 2120 F.(1000C.),  however, significantly reduces the goitrogens, so you can enjoy the pleasures and many nutritional benefits of this vegetable. This would be true for other cruciferous veggies like broccoli, Brussel sprouts, collards, etc. (For those who suffer chronic thyroid disorders, it might be wise to consider bypassing cruciferous vegetables altogether.) 

  • 6 cups torn and de-stemmed curly kale, in 2 inch or so-sized pieces
  • 2 tsp. unrefined coconut oil, cultured or grass-fed organic butter or ghee
  • ¼ tsp. unrefined salt
  1. Wash and spin dry the kale leaves until completely dry.
  2. Place dried leaves in a large bowl. Add the oil and toss with hands until every leaf is coated.
  3. Sprinkle on salt and toss again to spread evenly.
  4. Place parchment paper on a baking sheet and arrange the kale evenly without overlapping.
  5. Bake in a 300-degree F. oven until crisp and dark green, approx. 12-15 min.
  6. Let cool completely before removing from the pan or eating. This allows the chips to crisp up further. Keep in an air-tight containing. (Don’t refrigerate — the chips will soften with moisture and loose their crunch!)

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Carrot

April 10, 2017

The carrot has been native to Europe since ancient times, and was introduced to the United States during the period of early colonization. Carrots soon became a staple garden crop. Today, they are one of the major truck and garden vegetables.

Depending on the variety, carrots grow to maturity and are ready for market within 70 to 120 days. They are always in season, and are produced in nearly all states. The largest carrot producers are Texas, Florida, and New York. Carrots are so easy to raise that a garden in your backyard in can yield carrots that are rich in vitamins and high in mineral content.

When purchasing carrots, look for firm, smooth, well-shaped carrots of good color and fresh appearance. The tops should be fresh and green, unless they have been damaged in transit from grower to market. Carrots with excessively thick masses of leaf stems at the point of attachment arc usually undesirable because they have large cores and may be woody. Look for carrots with “eye appeal.”

Carrots may be utilized in the diet in many ways. The best way is to eat them raw and as fresh as possible. Raw cam sticks and curls are attractive garnishes and appetizers. Grated carrot, steamed in a stainless steel kettle or baked in the oven and served with parsley and butter, is a nice dish. The bright color of carrots makes them appealing and appetizing to serve with dinner, in salads, with other vegetables, or with cottage cheese or apples and nuts.

Carrot tops are full of potassium, but because of this they are so bitter that the average person does not enjoy them. However, a small portion of the tops may be cut fine and put into mixed salads, or a bunch may be tied with string and cooked in broths or soups for flavoring and for their high mineral content. Lift them out before saving.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Because the carrot is so high in vitamin A, it has been used extensively in the diet to improve the eyesight. Carrots were used in World War II in aerial training schools to improve the eyesight of the students.

Many children have lower jaws that are underdeveloped. This deformity is usually the result of calcium deficiency in the child’s early growth. Babies do not always get enough calcium and some do not have enough raw food or other chewing foods that help promote normal growth of bones and teeth. It is good for a child to have a raw carrot with each meal. I have seen the teeth of children straighten out and the lower jaw develop in a year, when they were given a carrot to chew on before each meal.

Carrots contain a great deal of roughage. They will help in an cases of constipation.

Used as a general bodybuilder, carrot juice is excellent. This juice is presently used in cases of severe illness, and as a foundation in cancer diets. It is delicious and nutritious when combined with other juices such as parsley, celery, watercress, endive, or romaine lettuce.

Everyone can benefit from drinking fresh vegetable juice, and carrot juice one of the best. Some juice vendors believe that die short, stubby carrot is the most flavorful and colorful, and contains more vitamins and minerals. However, the long, deader carrot can be high in these values, too, and is also used.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 179

Protein: 4.8 g

Fat: 1.2 g

Carbohydrates: 37.2 g

Calcium: 156 mg

Phosphorus: 148 mg

Iron: 3.2 mg

Vitamin A: 48,000 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.27 mg

Riboflavin: 0.26 mg

Niacin: 2 mg

Ascorbic acid: 24 mg

Lima Beans

April 3, 2017

Records found in old Peruvian tombs show that lima beans have been around for centuries. European explorers found this vegetable in Lima, Peru, and this is where the name comes from. Lima beans probably originated in Guatemala, and are still grown in tropical regions.

The flourishing dry lima bean industry of southern California seems to have started in 1865. In this year, Henry Lewis bought a few hundred pounds of lima bean seeds from a tramp steamer from Peru that had put in port at Santa Barbara. Most of the dry lima bean crop is produced along the Pacific coast from Santa Ana to Santa Barbara, and Florida is also a large producer of lima beans. The peak months of supply are July through October.

There are two types of lima beans. The large “potato” type have large pods and are fleshy and not likely to split at maturity. The baby lima bean is an annual plant that matures early. The pods are small and numerous, and are likely to split open at maturity.

When selecting lima beans, look for quality pods that are fresh, bright green in color, and well-filled. Lima beans, when shelled, should be plump with tender skins, green to greenish white. The skin should puncture when it is tested. Hard, tough skins mean that the bean is over mature, and these beans usually lack flavor. Lima beans are often called “butter” beans.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Lima beans can be used either dry or fresh. Fresh lima beans are alkaline and have high protein value. Dry limas are hard to digest, and the dry skin is irritating to an inflamed digestive system. Lima beans are beneficial to the muscular system.

Lima beans are excellent as a puree in soft diets for stomach disorders. They make a tasty baked dish, such as bean loaf. One pound of lima beans contains as many nutrients as two pounds of meat!

Dry beans have high protein content of almost 18%, but fresh beans are only 4% protein. The kidney bean and navy bean are very similar in makeup and therapeutic value to the lima bean.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (unshelled)

Calories: 234

Protein: 13.6 g

Fat: 1.5 g

Carbohydrates: 42.8 g

Calcium: 115 mg

Phosphorus: 288 mg

Iron: 4.2 mg

Vitamin A: 520 I.U.

Thiamine: .38 mg

Riboflavin: .21 mg

Niacin: 2.5 mg

Ascorbic acid: 48 mg

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