Foundation for Advancement in Cancer Therapy

Non-Traditional Approaches to
the Theories, Treatments and Prevention of Cancer

Tomato

June 26, 2017

It is believed that the present type of tomato is descended from a species no larger than marbles, that grew thousands of years ago. The tomato is native to the Andean region of South America and was under cultivation in Peru in the sixteenth century at the time of the Spanish conquest. Before the end of the sixteenth century, the people of England and the Netherlands were eating and enjoying tomatoes. The English called it the “love apple”, and English romancers presented it as a token of affection; Sir Walter Raleigh is said to have presented one to Queen Elizabeth.

M. F. Corne is credited with being the first man to eat a tomato. His fellow citizens of Newport, Rhode Island, erected a monument to him, because the tomato was considered poisonous until Mr. Corne dared to eat one.

By cultivation and use the tomato is a vegetable; botanically, it is a fruit, and can be classified as a berry, being pulpy and containing one or more seeds that are not stones. It is considered a citric acid fruit and is in the same classification as oranges and grapefruit. Some oxalic acid is also contained in the tomato.

Consumption of tomatoes is on the increase. They are the third most important vegetable crop on the basis of market value; the first is potatoes. Tomatoes are produced in all states. In order of importance, the producers are: Texas, California, Florida, Ohio, and Tennessee. In the first four month~ of the year heavy shipments are imported from Mexico and Cuba. Fresh tomatoes are available all year, either from domestic production or imports. June and August are the peak months.

Tomatoes number greatly in variety, but it is estimated that only sixteen varieties are included in 90 percent of all tomatoes grown in the United States. Their characteristic colors range from pink to scarlet. A white tomato has recently been developed that is supposed to be acid-free. A good, mature tomato is neither overripe nor soft, but well developed, smooth, and free from decay, cracks, or bruises. Spoiled tomatoes should be separated immediately from the sound ones or decay will quickly spread.

If fresh, ripe tomatoes are unavailable, canned tomato and canned tomato juice are fine substitutes. It is preferable to use tomato puree, rather than canned tomatoes put up in water. Puree contains more vitamins and minerals.

Tomatoes are best when combined with proteins. Use tomatoes in both fruit and vegetable salads. They are cooling and refreshing in beverages, and are especially good as a flavoring for soups. Tomatoes can be used to give color, and make green salads more inviting.

Tomato juice should be used very soon after it has been drawn from the tomato, or after the canned juice is opened. If it is opened and left that way, it will lose much of its mineral value, because it oxidizes very quickly.

Tomatoes should be picked ripe, as the acids of the green tomato are very detrimental to the body and very hard on the kidneys. Many of the tomatoes today are grown in hothouses and are picked too green and allowed to ripen on their way to the markets or in cold storage plants built for this purpose. If the seeds, or the internal part of the tomato, is still green, while the outside is red, this is an indication that the fruit has been picked too green.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

The tomato is not acid forming; it contains a great deal of citric acid but is alkaline forming when it enters the bloodstream. It increases the alkalinity of the blood and helps remove toxins, especially uric acid, from the system. As a liver cleanser, tomatoes are wonderful, especially when used with the green vegetable juices.

In many of the sanitariums in Europe tomatoes are used as a poultice for various conditions in the body. There is a mistaken belief that tomatoes are not good for those who have rheumatism and gout. People with these conditions should mix tomato juice with other vegetable juices to avoid a reaction that may be too strong.

Whenever the blood is found to be stagnant in any part of the body, a tomato poultice is wonderful as a treatment in removing that stagnation. It acts as a dissolving agent or solvent.

Tomatoes are very high in vitamin value. They are wonderful as a blood cleanser, and excellent in elimination diets. However, they should not be used to excess on a regular basis. Tomato juice can be used in convalescent diets, in combination with other raw vegetable juices such as celery, parsley, beet, and carrot juice.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 97

Protein: 4.5 g

Fat: 0.9 g

Carbohydrates: 17.7 g

Calcium: 50 mg

Phosphorus: 123 mg

Iron: 2.7 mg

Vitamin A: 4,0801.U.

Thiamine: 0.23 mg

Riboflavin: 0.15mg

Niacin: 3.2 mg

Ascorbic acid: 102 mg

Cucumber

June 19, 2017

The cucumber is said to be native to India, although plant explorers have never been able to discover a wild prototype. Cucumbers have been cultivated for thousands of years, and records indicate that they were used as food in ancient Egypt, and were a popular vegetable with the Greeks and Romans. The cucumber is one of the few vegetables mentioned in the Bible.

In 200 B.C. a Chinese ambassador traveled as far as Persia, where he saw cucumbers for the first time. Later, he brought them to China. At a later date, an English sea captain, returning from the West Indies, brought back pickled gherkins to Mrs. Samuel Pepys. Shortly after this period, cucumbers were grown in England.

Occasionally, in a collection of old glass, a plain glass tube or cylinder resembling a lamp chimney with parallel sides will tum up. This may be an English cucumber glass, a device used at one time to make cucumbers grow straight. George Stephenson, inventor of the locomotive, is credited with its invention.

Florida is the principal producer of cucumbers, supplying almost one-third of the total United States commercial crop for market. California, North and South Carolina, New Jersey, and New York are also large producers.

Cucumbers for slicing should be firm, fresh, bright, well shaped, and of good medium or dark green color. The flesh should be firm and the seeds immature. Withered or shriveled cucumbers should be avoided. Their flesh is generally tough or rubbery and somewhat bitter. Over maturity is indicated by a generally overgrown, puffy appearance. The color of over mature cucumbers is generally dull and not infrequently yellowed, the flesh is tough, the seeds hard, and the flesh in the seed cavity almost jelly-like. Cucumbers in this condition should not be used for slicing. Some varieties are of solid green color when mature enough for slicing. but usually a little whitish color will be found at the tip, with a tendency to extend in lines along the seams, where they advance from pale green to white, and finally yellow with age.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Cucumbers are alkaline, non-starchy vegetables. They are a cooling food, especially when used in vegetable juices. Long ago it was believed that people would die from eating the peelings, but this is not true.

Cucumbers are wonderful as a digestive aid, and have a purifying effect on the bowel. It is not necessary to soak them in salt water. Serve them thinly sliced, raw, in sour cream, lemon juice, or yogurt for a delightful summer dish. They have a marvelous effect on the skin, and the old saying ”keeping cool as a cucumber” is literally true because of its cooling effect on the blood.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (without peel)

Calories: 39

Protein: 2.2g

Fat: .o3g

Carbohydrates: 8.6g

Calcium: 32mg

Phosphorus: 67mg

Iron: 1.0mg

Vitamin A: 0 I.U.

Thiamine: .11mg

Riboflavin: .14mg

Niacin: .7mg

Ascorbic Acid: 27mg

Rethinking Cancer Newsletter #62

June 14, 2017

Filed under: Rethinking Cancer Newsletters — ggrieser @ 4:44 pm

This newsletter asks a lot of questions (see article titles) which we hope you’ll find informative and even intriguing. We all have questions and perhaps the best way to find answers is to have reliable sources, like books, at our fingertips. For four decades FACT’s official publication, Cancer Forum, included a very select listing of books which we felt we’re essential for understanding the way the body works and how to regain and maintain optimum health. In short, they contain the essentials of the Biorepair/metabolic healing program that has produced so many long-term recovered patients, as well as so many healthy individuals who never had to deal with a cancer diagnosis.

There are many books out today with catchy titles, proclaiming miracle cures, super foods and supplements for every ill, etc. The books on our list are from a different time, when natural healing therapies were not part of an alternative health industry worth billions a year. These books were written by clinicians with years of experience with a wide range of patients. They are full of wisdom and practical advice. We have now added links to many of these classics on our Donate page, so that you can add them to your library. Take a look!

To your health!
Foundation for Advancement in Cancer Therapy (FACT)

P.S. We’re always glad to hear your questions and comments at info@rethinkingcancer.org. And watch our film on iTunes/Amazon as well as follow us on TwitterFacebook and our YouTube channel!

Are You Grounded?

Is it possible that the simple, regular act of walking barefoot on the Earth can reduce stress, improve sleep, relieve chronic pain and reduce insidious chronic inflammation?

We humans spend our entire lives on this planet, yet we barely make physical contact with the actual ground. Most of our time is passed indoors, often living and working in units hundreds of foot above the ground, wearing rubber or plastic soled shoes that insulate us from the earth, surrounded by electromagnetic fields (EMF) —WI-Fi, mobile phone waves — and other types of pollution that build up positive ions in the form of free radicals in our bodies. READ MORE

What Are You Wearing?

More and more of us today are striving to live a healthy lifestyle. We avoid chemicalized, denatured, over-processed foods. We drink pure water instead of municipal tap with its cocktail of toxic additives. We exercise regularly, practice meditation in its many forms and try to get a good night’s sleep. But how many of us consider that the clothes we wear may be hazardous to our health?

Most of the clothes produced today, including popular high and low-end name brands, are made from synthetic fibers — marketed as “wrinkle resistant, easy-to-clean, durable” — that contain a host of toxic chemicals such as PFC, phthlates, cadium, formaldehyde. Moreover, the manufacturing process of these goods causes major pollution in our food, air and water, along with dangerous working conditions for those who do the labor. Even Monsanto is in the game with its new super-toxic GMO dicamba-resistent cotton, a big seller, otherwise known as “frankencotton” by concerned environmentalists. READ MORE

Will the New GMO Apple a Day 
Keep the Doctor Away?

Heads up: a new kind of apple could soon be on supermarket shelves near you. It’s the GMO “Artic” Apple, owned by Intrexon, the company that brought us the GMO salmon and GMO mosquito, with peaches, cherries, pears and more in the pipeline. The apples, expected to be approved by U.S. Department of Agriculture later this year, will carry a label that says “Arctic,” but, thanks to a labeling obfuscation bill passed last year by Congress, nowhere on the product will there appear the letters “GMO.”

Friends of the Earth (FOE) has identified 10 stores in the Midwest currently consumer-testing packages of the sliced GMO apple. In other words, they are using people as GMO apple guinea pigs. The “Arctic” is the result of an experimental, unregulated technique called RNA interference that blocks genes related to enzymes that cause an apple to brown when cut. Scientists have warned that this genetic manipulation poses health risks as the manipulated RNA gets into digestive systems and bloodstreams and can lead to negative consequences. The new apple will also be drenched in toxic pesticide residues, also untested by FDA and unlabeled. In short, the “Arctic” apple may not taste great, but it will look eternally fresh! READ MORE

How About Some Good “Old-Fashioned” Apple Slices?

Fresh apples will naturally brown after being sliced. But you don’t need un-brownable GMO apples, whose natural enzymes have been blocked by RNA manipulation, to enjoy un-browned apple slices.

2 apples, peeled, cored and cut into slices
juice of 2 oranges

Dip each slice of apple in the orange juice and arrange on a serving plate. The orange juice keeps the slices from turning brown and combines well with the flavor of apple.
 
Thanks to Nourishing Traditions by Sally Fallon, President of Weston A. Price Foundation, for this recipe.

Lime

June 12, 2017

The lime is native to southeastern Asia and has been cultivated for thousands of years. It is believed that the Arabs brought them from India during the period of Mohammedan expansion in A.D. 570-900. From the earliest days of British sailing vessels, British sailors were given a regular ration of lime juice to prevent scurvy at sea, resulting in the nickname Limey for British sailors.

Limes have been grown in California and Florida since the early days of the citrus industry. After the great freeze in Florida in 1894-95, when the lemon industry was almost totally destroyed, California began growing virtually all the lemons in the United States. At this time Florida’s lime industry expanded, and now Florida grows most of the limes used in this country. California is second in production, and Mexico is a close third. Limes grow all year. Florida produces them from April to April, and California from October throughout the year. The main season for imports is May through August.

Limes that are green in color and heavy for their size are the most desirable commercially, because of their extreme acidity. The full, ripe, yellow lime does not have a high acid content. If the lime is kept until fully ripe it may be used in the very same way the lemon is used, and to fortify other foods with vitamin C. Like lemons, limes are very high in vitamin C, are a good source of vitamin B1, and are rich in potassium. They spoil easily, and limes with a dry, leathery skin or soft, moldy areas should be avoided. Store limes in a cool, dry place.

Limes contain 5 to 6 percent citric acid, and are too acid to drink without sweetening. Their natural flavor is enhanced when combined with other juices. Limes make a delicious dressing for fish, and, when added to melons, bring out the natural flavor of the melon. A few drops of lime juice added to consommé, or jellied soups, give a particular zest to the flavor. Sub-acid fruits, such as apples, pears, plums, peaches, grapes, and apricots, go best with limes.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Limes are good for the relief of arthritis because they have such a high vitamin C content. They are especially good for anyone with acidemia, because they are one of the most alkalinizing foods. A drink of lime juice and whey is a wonderful cooler for the brain and nervous system. Limes can be used to treat brain fever, or someone who is mentally ill. They are good for a brain with a great deal of hot blood in it, which usually shows itself in anger, hatred, or other brain disturbances. Limes make a wonderful sedative for those suffering from these afflictions.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (without rinds or seeds)

Calories: 107

Protein: 2.8g

Fat: .8g

Carbohydrates: 42.4g

Calcium: 126mg

Phosphorus: 69mg

Iron: 2.3mg

Vitamin A: 50 I.U.

Thiamine: .1mg

Riboflavin: .08mg

Niacin: .7mg

Ascorbic Acid: 94mg

Beets

June 5, 2017

The beet has been cultivated for its roots and leaves since the third or fourth century B.C. It spread from the area of the Mediterranean to the Near East. In ancient times it was used only for medicinal purposes-the edible beet root we know today was unknown before the Christian era. In the fourth century beet recipes were recorded in England, and in 1810 the beet began to be cultivated for sugar in France and Germany. It is not known when the beet was first introduced to the United States, but it is known that there was one variety grown here in 1806. Sugar beets are usually yellowish-white, and are cultivated extensively in this country. The garden beet ranges from dark purplish-red to a bright vermilion to white, but the most popular commercial variety is red.

Beets are available in the markets all year. Their peak season is May through October. They are primarily grown in the southern United States, the Northeast, and the vest coast states. When selecting beets, do not just look at the condition of the leaves. Beets that remain to the ground too long become tough and woody, and can be identified by a short neck, deep scars, or several circles of leaf scars around the top of the beet.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Beets are wonderful for adding needed minerals. They can be used to eliminate pocket add material in the bowel and for ailments in the gall bladder and liver. Their vitamin A content is quite high, so they are not only good for the eliminative system, but also benefit the digestive and lymphatic systems.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (without tops)

Calories: 147

Protein: 5.4 g

Fat: 0.3 g

Carbohydrates: 32.6 g

Calcium: 51 mg

Phosphorus: 92 mg

Iron: 3.4 mg

Vitamin A: 22,700 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.07 mg

Riboflavin: 0.16 mg

Niacin: 1.5 mg

Ascorbic acid: 80 mg

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