Foundation for Advancement in Cancer Therapy

Non-Traditional Approaches to
the Theories, Treatments and Prevention of Cancer

Plums and Fresh Prunes

September 25, 2017

The early colonists found plums growing wild along the entire Eastern coast. They were one of many fruits eaten by the Indians before the coming of the white man, and reports of early explorers mention the finding of plums growing in abundance. Today however native plums are not important commercially. The European type of plums, Prunas Domestica, has replaced the native plum. Plum pits from Europe probably were brought to America by the first colonists, for it is reported that plums were planted by the Pilgrims in Massachusetts, and the French brought them to Canada.

Although plums came to America by way of Europe, they are believed to have originated in Western Asia in the region south of the Caucasus Mountains to the Caspian Sea. According to the earliest writings in which the European plum is mentioned,the species dates back at least 2000 years.

Another species, Prunus Institia, known to us as the Damson plum, also came to America by way of Europe. This plum was named for Damascus and apparently antedates the European type, although Damson pits have been found in the lake dwellings of Switzerland and in other ancient ruins.

Another important species, the Japanese plum, was domesticated in Japan, but originated in China. It was introduced in the United States about 1870. This type is grown extensively in California.

Plums have been grown in some of the Spanish mission gardens of California at least as early as 1792, and the first prune plums grown in California were produced in Santa Clara Mission. However, the present California prune industry is not based on these but the French prune, Petite Prune d’Agen, scions of which were brought to California from France in 1856 by Pierre Pellier. French-type prunes grown in California orchards were shipped in to San Francisco markets in 1859.

Botanically, plums and prunes of the European or Domestica type belong to the same species. The interchangeable use of the terms “plum and prune” dates back for several centuries. Plum is Anglo-Saxon, and prune is French. It is uncertain just when the word prune was first used to designate a dried plum or a plum suitable for drying. The prune is a variety of plum that can be dried without fermenting when the pit is left in. Fresh prunes, as compared with plums, have firmer flesh, higher sugar content, and frequently higher acid content. A ripe, fresh prune can be separated from the pit like a freestone peach, but a plum cannot be opened this way.

Of all the stone fruits, plums have the largest number and greatest diversity of kinds and species. H.F. Tysser, editor of Fruit Manual, published in London, says there are over 2000 varieties. Samual Fraser, in his book America Fruits, speaks of a list of about 1500 varieties of Old World plums alone, and says there probably are just as many varieties of plums native to this continent. In addition, there is a long list of Japanese and Chinese plums.

Almost all of the plums shipped in the United States are grown in California. There are two types of California plums, Japanese and European. The former marketed early in the season and the latter in mid season or later. The Japanese varieties are characterized by their large size, heart-shape, and bright red or yellow color. Japanese varieties are never blue.

Plums and prunes of good quality are plump, clean, of fresh appearance, full colored for the particular variety, and soft enough to yield to slight pressure. Unless one is well acquainted with varieties, color alone cannot be replied upon an indication of ripeness. Some varieties are fully ripe when the color is yellowish-green, others when the color is red, and others when purplish-blue or black. Softening at the tip is a good indication of maturity. Immature fruit is hard. It may be shriveled and is generally of poor color or flavor. Over mature fruit is generally soft, easily bruised, and is often leaky.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Fresh plums are more acid to the body than fresh prunes. When too many plums are eaten, an over acid condition results. When prunes are dried, however they are wonderful for the nerves because the contain a phosphorus content of nearly 5 percent.

Prunes have a laxative effect. The dried prune is better to eat than the fresh plum or prune. The salts contained in the dried prune are valuable as food for the blood, brain and nerves. The French prunes are considered the best for their value to the nervous system.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 218

Protein: 3 g

Fat: 0.9 g

Carbohydrates: 55.6 g

Calcium: 73 mg

Phosphorus: 86 mg

Iron: 2.2 mg

Vitamin A: 1200 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.28 mg

Riboflavin: 0.18 mg

Niacin: 2.1 mg

Ascorbic acid: 20 mg

Artichoke

September 18, 2017

The artichoke is believed to be native to the area around the western and central Mediterranean. The Romans were growing artichokes over 2000 years ago, and used it as a green and a salad plant.

Artichokes were brought to England in 1548, and French settlers planted them in Louisiana in the mid-nineteenth century. California is now the center of the artichoke crop, and its peak season is March, April, and May.

The name “artichoke” is derived from the northern Italian words “articiocco” and “articoclos,” which refer to what we know to be a pine cone. The artichoke bud does resemble a pine cone.

There is a variety of vegetable called the Jerusalem artichoke, but it is not a true artichoke. It is a tuberous member of the sunflower family. Here, we refer to the two types of true artichokes, the Cardoon (cone-shaped) and the Globe. The most popular variety is the Green Globe.

The artichoke is a large, vigorous plant. It has long, coarse, spiny leaves that can grow to three feet long. The artichoke plants may grow as high as six feet tall.

A perennial, the artichoke grows best in cool, but not freezing, weather. It likes plenty of water, and rain and fog, so is best suited to the California coast, especially the San Francisco area.

For a good quality artichoke, select one that is compact, plump, and heavy, yields slightly to pressure, and has large, tightly clinging, fleshy leaf scales that are a good color. An artichoke that is brown is old or has been injured. An artichoke is over mature when it is open or spreading, the center is fuzzy or dark pink or purple, and the tips and scales are hard. March, April, and May are the months when the artichoke is abundant.

The parts of the artichoke that are eaten are the fleshy part of the leaves and heart, and the tender base. Medium-sized artichokes are best—large ones tend to be tough and tasteless. They may be served either hot or cold, and make a delicious salad.

To prepare artichokes, cut off the stem and any tough or damaged leaves. Wash the artichoke in cold running water, then place in boiling water, and cook twenty to thirty minutes, or until tender. To make the artichoke easier to eat, remove the choke in the center, pull out the top center leaves, and, with a spoon, remove the thistle-like inside.

To eat artichokes, pull off the petal leaves as you would the petals of a daisy, and bite off the end.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Artichoke hearts and leaves have a high alkaline ash. They also have a great deal of roughage, which is not good for those who have inflammation of the bowel. They are good to eat on a reducing diet.

Artichokes contain vitamins A and C, which are good for fighting off infection. They are high in calcium and iron.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (including inedible parts)

Calories: 60

Protein: 5.3 g

Fat: 0.4 g

Carbohydrates: 19.2 g

Calcium: 93 mg

Phosphorus: 160 mg

Iron: 2.4 mg

Vitamin A: 290 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.14 mg

Riboflavin: 0.09 mg

Niacin: 1.7 mg

Ascorbic acid: 22 mg

Endive and Escarole

September 11, 2017

Native to the East Indies, endive and escarole were introduced into Egypt and Greece at a very early period and references to them appear in history. The plants were brought to America by colonists. Endive is closely related botanically to chicory and the two names are sometimes incorrectly used as synonyms. Escarole is another name for a type of endive with broad leaves and a well-blanched heart. The word “endive” is used to designate plants with narrow, finely divided, curly leaves. These greens are used raw in salad, or may be cooked like spinach. The slightly bitter flavor adds zest to a mixed salad.

Crispness, freshness, and tenderness are essential factors of quality. Wilted plants, especially those that have brown leaves, are undesirable, as are plants with tough, coarse leaves. Such leaves will be excessively bitter. Tenderness can be determined by breaking or twisting a leaf. In the unblanched condition leaves should be green, but when blanched, center leaves should be creamy white or yellowish white.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Escarole and endive are very high in vitamin A, and work very well in ridding the body of infections. They are both high in iron and potassium and are alkaline in reaction. Escarole and endive are both useful as an appetite stimulant because of their bitter ingredients. Escarole also helps to activate the bile. They are best when used raw.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (both escarole and endive)

Calories: 80

Protein: 6.8g

Fat: .4g

Carbohydrates: 16.4g

Calcium: 323mg

Phosphorus: 216mg

Iron: 6.8mg

Vitamin A: 13,170 I.U.

Thiamine: .27mg

Riboflavin: .56mg

Niacin: 2mg

Ascorbic Acid: 42mg

Rethinking Cancer Newsletter #63

September 7, 2017

Filed under: Rethinking Cancer Newsletters — ggrieser @ 5:30 pm

Occasionally, we get a question on our info@rethinkingcancer.org that makes us wonder if we’re getting our message across as effectively as we’d like. Here’s a recent example:

“I take two 500 mg of clove caps. Is this too much? I read it was the top antioxidant food.”

Clove may contain many beneficial elements, including antioxidants, but taking this amount routinely, particularly as a supplement, can be too harsh on the system. Supplements should be used sparingly and only for as long as needed to resolve a difficiency or other issue. Real food is what the body is designed for. Moreover, doubling down on one food, like clove, because of its antioxidant content is flawed thinking. Antioxidants are found to some degree in a multitude of fresh, whole foods, but to focus on one edible item because of one attribute is to miss the panoply of vital elements — many of which may not yet even be known by science— in other so-called “lesser” foods. There is no “magic bullet” food to insure health or protect us from all disease. Nature has provided us with a food supply of stunning diversity, each creation containing its unique tapestry (essential synergism) of phytochemicals, antioxidants, minerals, vitamins, etc., for sustaining life. Don’t miss out on any of the goodness. Mix it up! Listen to your body! One day you may find yourself drawn to a cauliflower, the next day it’s something else. Some days you’re very hungry, others not. The body is a dynamic instrument and does not do well on “automatic

”Cloves are nice, but variety is truly the “top” spice of life.

To your health!

Foundation for Advancement in Cancer Therapy (F.A.C.T.)

P.S. Take a look at our Donate page, now with links to a “variety” of classic books essential for your health library.  And don’t forget, you can stream our film on iTunes and on Amazon. Do keep in touch on TwitterFacebook and our YouTube channel!

A New Breed of Doctor

By Alan H. Nittler, M.D.

The great need of the average citizen of planet Earth is to know how to live a healthy, productive life, free of disease. In 1972, Dr. Alan Nittler wrote a book called A New Breed of Doctor in which he lamented the fact that very few doctors focus on teaching this sort of thing in their practice. He hoped that a new breed would emerge who considered it infinitely more important to keep you well than to try to help you when you’re sick. Today, 45 years later, there are more doctors who understand this (many of whom can be found on our (Practitioner Directory), but there is still a great need for more. Here are some of his thoughts:

The doctor of the future will influence the political process and the food and drug laws. He will see that restaurants do not serve food that brings on degeneration. He will have a voice in food processing, manufacturing and packaging. In the future, we will have hospitals that will not allow patients to check out before they know how to change their habits and prevent future recurrences of their condition. We will learn how to cook right. Read More

A Travel Tip: Grapefruit Seed Extract

As the Northern Hemisphere moves into summer, many of us will be heading for exotic locales. But nothing can ruin a vacation faster than picking up some exotic bacteria or other assorted critters from the local water or food, leading to a case of  “Montezuma’s Revenge” (a.k.a. Traveler’s Diarrhea) — a quick way to turn a dream trip into a nightmare.

So here’s a little known secret: grapefruit seed extract (GSE). Read More

On the Rebound

The simple act of bouncing on a rebounder (mini-trampoline) is a uniquely powerful form of exercise. While most types of workouts target specific muscles or just increase cardiovascular function, rebounding uses the forces of acceleration and deceleration to activate literally every cell in the body without stressing any particular part.

The idea of rebounding has been around for quite a while. However, it really picked up steam in the 1980’s when NASA was looking for the most effective way to counteract the harmful effects of weightlessness on the body, namely, that after as little as 14 days in space, astronauts can lose up to 15% of bone and muscle mass. After conducting studies comparing the benefits of various forms of exercise, they found rebounding to be the superior choice. Read More

Iced Turmeric Lemonade

After bouncing on your rebounder, you might be up for something refreshing to drink. Iced turmeric lemonade combines the flavor of earthy turmeric with fresh lemon and natural sweetness for a surprisingly delicious, salubrious drink. A spice superstar, turmeric has long been known for its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties which benefit virtually every organ of the body. Current studies focus on it’s potential to lower the incidence and severity of chronic diseases, such as cancer, heart disease, Alzheimer’s, and to improve blood sugar balance, support kidney function, lessen the severity of arthritis and some digestive disorders.

  • 1 cup pure water (preferably distilled)
  • 3/4 cup of ice
  • 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice (or more to taste)
  • ½ -1 tsp. teaspoon turmeric powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon stevia drops (or more to taste), or about a teaspoon of other natural
  • sweetener like raw honey, maple syrup, etc.
  • tiny pinch of black pepper (increases the benefits of turmeric)
  1. Combine all ingredients in a high speed blender and blend until ice is completely blended in.
  2. Let rest about 30 seconds before pouring. Serve over more ice, if you like.
  3. Drink immediately for peak flavor and potency.

You can also substitute limes for lemons; for oranges, double the juice and reduce the water by 1/4 cup.

Thanks to Wellness Mama for this recipe!

Blackberry

September 5, 2017

Blackberries are native to both North America and Europe, but cultivation of this fruit is largely limited to North America. In the early days of the United States, when land was cleared for pasture, blackberry bushes began to multiply. There are many hybrids of blackberries, and both man and nature have had a hand in this process. By 1850, cultivated blackberries had become very popular. Blackberries are now cultivated in almost every part of the United States. Texas and Oregon probably have the largest numbers of acres planted with blackberries. Cultivation of this berry has been slow, because wild berries grow in abundance all over the country. The summer months are the peak season for blackberries.

A quality berry is solid and plump, appears bright and fresh, and is a full black or blue color. Do not choose berries that are partly green or off-color, because the flavor will not be good.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Blackberries are high in iron, but can cause constipation. They have been used for years to control diarrhea. If blackberry juice is mixed with cherry or prune juice, the constipating effect will be taken away. If one can take blackberry juice without constipating results, it is one of the finest builders of the blood.

Much like spinach, raisins, apples, plums and grapes, blackberries are rich in bio-flavonoids and Vitamin C, but other nutritional benefits include a very low sodium count and having only 62 calories to a cup. The dark blue color ensures blackberries have one of the highest antioxidant levels of all fruits. Antioxidants, well-known for lowering the risk of a number of cancers, are a huge bonus, but be aware the berries are best consumed in their natural state to get the full benefits.

The berries are known by a variety of names, which include brambleberries, bramble, dewberry, thimbleberry and lawers. Consumption of blackberries can help to promote the healthy tightening of tissue, which is a great non-surgical procedure to make skin look younger. Prolonged consumption also helps keeps your brain alert, thereby maintaining clarity of thought and good memory. The high tannin content of blackberries provides a number of benefits to reduce intestinal inflammation, alleviate hemorrhoids and soothe the effects of diarrhea.

Traditionally, the leaves and barks of the plant have also been consumed. The leaves of blackberries have been used to treat mild inflammation of the gums and sometimes even sore throats. The astringent tannins are effective in oral hygiene when used as a gargle or mouthwash. The leaves can also be used in a refreshing cup of tea or enhanced as a therapeutic drink. Not everyone will like the flavor, so to mask the bitter taste, honey or another form of sweetener may be added. The healthy dose of Vitamin K aids in muscle relaxing, so some women use the berries to alleviate labor pains. As part of a regular diet, the juice can also be used to regulate menstruation as it is very effective in helping blood to clot.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 294

Protein: 5.4 g

Fat: 3.6 g

Carbohydrates: 59.9 g

Calcium: 163 mg

Phosphorus: 154 mg

Iron: 4.1 mg

Vitamin A: 1,460 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.12 mg

Riboflavin: 0.03 mg

Niacin: 1.3 mg

Ascorbic acid: 106 mg

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