Foundation for Advancement in Cancer Therapy

Non-Traditional Approaches to
the Theories, Treatments and Prevention of Cancer

Carrot

March 26, 2018

The carrot has been native to Europe since ancient times, and was introduced to the United States during the period of early colonization. Carrots soon became a staple garden crop. Today, they are one of the major truck and garden vegetables.

Depending on the variety, carrots grow to maturity and are ready for market within 70 to 120 days. They are always in season, and are produced in nearly all states. The largest carrot producers are Texas, Florida, and New York. Carrots are so easy to raise that a garden in your backyard in can yield carrots that are rich in vitamins and high in mineral content.

When purchasing carrots, look for firm, smooth, well-shaped carrots of good color and fresh appearance. The tops should be fresh and green, unless they have been damaged in transit from grower to market. Carrots with excessively thick masses of leaf stems at the point of attachment arc usually undesirable because they have large cores and may be woody. Look for carrots with “eye appeal.”

Carrots may be utilized in the diet in many ways. The best way is to eat them raw and as fresh as possible. Raw cam sticks and curls are attractive garnishes and appetizers. Grated carrot, steamed in a stainless steel kettle or baked in the oven and served with parsley and butter, is a nice dish. The bright color of carrots makes them appealing and appetizing to serve with dinner, in salads, with other vegetables, or with cottage cheese or apples and nuts.

Carrot tops are full of potassium, but because of this they are so bitter that the average person does not enjoy them. However, a small portion of the tops may be cut fine and put into mixed salads, or a bunch may be tied with string and cooked in broths or soups for flavoring and for their high mineral content. Lift them out before saving.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Because the carrot is so high in vitamin A, it has been used extensively in the diet to improve the eyesight. Carrots were used in World War II in aerial training schools to improve the eyesight of the students.

Many children have lower jaws that are underdeveloped. This deformity is usually the result of calcium deficiency in the child’s early growth. Babies do not always get enough calcium and some do not have enough raw food or other chewing foods that help promote normal growth of bones and teeth. It is good for a child to have a raw carrot with each meal. I have seen the teeth of children straighten out and the lower jaw develop in a year, when they were given a carrot to chew on before each meal.

Carrots contain a great deal of roughage. They will help in an cases of constipation.

Used as a general bodybuilder, carrot juice is excellent. This juice is presently used in cases of severe illness, and as a foundation in cancer diets. It is delicious and nutritious when combined with other juices such as parsley, celery, watercress, endive, or romaine lettuce.

Everyone can benefit from drinking fresh vegetable juice, and carrot juice one of the best. Some juice vendors believe that die short, stubby carrot is the most flavorful and colorful, and contains more vitamins and minerals. However, the long, deader carrot can be high in these values, too, and is also used.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 179

Protein: 4.8 g

Fat: 1.2 g

Carbohydrates: 37.2 g

Calcium: 156 mg

Phosphorus: 148 mg

Iron: 3.2 mg

Vitamin A: 48,000 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.27 mg

Riboflavin: 0.26 mg

Niacin: 2 mg

Ascorbic acid: 24 mg

Strawberry

March 19, 2018

The strawberry is native to North and South America. An early Chilean variety was taken to Peru in 1557 and this same variety is still growing in Chile, Peru, Ecuador, and other South American countries. The modem strawberry was developed in Europe.

Most strawberry varieties that grow commercially today have originated within the last fifty-five years. Territories for their growth have expanded to almost every state in the Union, including the interior of Alaska.

How the name “strawberry” first came into use is often disputed. One researcher tells us that it was because straw was used between the rows to keep the berries clean and to protect the berries in the winter. Another explanation is that in Europe ripe berries were threaded on straws to be carried to market.

In 1945, about fifteen varieties constituted 94 percent of the total commercial market. The leading variety in the United States is the Blakemore, which originated in Maryland in 1923. Its firmness, earliness, and the fact that it holds its color when stored make it a leading market berry, The Klondike is grown extensively in Southern California and is one of the best shipping varieties. The Klonmore is native to Louisiana. Because it appears earlier, it is more resistant to disease and is fast replacing the Klondike in that state. Other popular varieties are the Howard 17 and the Marshall, which both originated in Massachusetts.

Strawberries are at their peak of abundance in April, May, and June; January, February, March, and July are moderate months.

Quality strawberries are fresh, clean, and bright in appearance. They have a solid red color, and the caps are attached. Strawberries without caps may have been roughly handled or are over-mature.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Strawberries are a good source of vitamin C, and contain a large amount of fruit sugar. They are an excellent spring tonic, and are delicious when juiced.

They can be considered an eliminative food, and are good for the intestinal tract. Strawberries have an alkaline reaction in the body. Because of their high sodium content, they can be considered “a food of youth.” They also have a good amount of potassium.

Many people complain about getting hives from strawberries. This is usually because they are not ripened on the vine. If you are allergic to strawberries, try this: run hot water over them, then Immediately follow this by running cold water over them. This takes the fuzz off the outside of the berries, which is believed to be the cause of the hives.

The seeds of the strawberry can be irritating in cases of inflammation of the bowel or colitis.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 179

Protein: 3.5 g

Fat: 2.6 g

Carbohydrates: 35.3 g

Calcium: 122 mg

Phosphorus: 118 mg

Iron: 3.5 mg

Vitamin A: 250 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.13 mg

Riboflavin: 0.29 mg

Niacin: 1.3mg

Ascorbic acid: 261 mg

Rethinking Cancer Newsletter – #65

March 13, 2018

Filed under: Rethinking Cancer Newsletters — ggrieser @ 9:46 am

The scene: An attractive couple walking hand in hand along the water’s edge of an exotic beach at sunset.
The woman (close up): “My (name of dread disease) was not improving. In fact, I was barely managing symptoms, so my doctor recommended (awkward-sounding multi-syllabic name of a new drug) and now my life has never been better!
Soothing voiceover (soft music playing): “(drug name) can cause serious side effects, such as diabetes, tuberculosis, kidney disease, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, cardiac arrest, depression, suicidal tendancies, sudden death…….Ask your doctor if (drug name) is right for you!”

Why is it that direct-to-consumer TV ads of prescription drugs like this are banned in every country in the world, except the U.S. and New Zealand? Drug companies spend millions a day to air them — $4.5 billion in 2016, an investment leading to higher drug prices and creating demand for the newest, flashiest, most expensive drugs which may be less safe or effective than older time-tested products. AND, of course these commercials do nothing to support the notion that there are ways other than toxic drugs to overcome serious health issues, or just manage symptoms.

Even the American Medical Association (AMA) has called for a ban on these promotions. But our Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has done nothing to crack down on them, perhaps fearing litigation on commercial free-speech or just the power of the drug lobby. If you’ve had enough, let your Congressional representatives know that they need to stand up to Big Pharma and get these ads off our airways! You can also sign this petition.

To your health!
Foundation for Advancement in Cancer Therapy (F.A.C.T.)

P.S. Heads up! We have a powerful new book coming out, hopefully, by the end of this year. It’s called Healing Cancer, a must-have for your health library. In the meantime, be sure to view our film, Rethinking Cancer (streaming on iTunes in Belgium, British Virgin Islands, Canada, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Ireland, Japan, Luxembourg, Spain, Taiwan, Thailand, United Kingdom, United States) and stay in touch on TwitterFacebook and our YouTube channel!

Should We Fear Getting Sick?
A Traditional Chinese Medicine Perspective 

by Rishma Parpia

Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) originated in ancient China and is one of the oldest healing systems practiced for thousands of years. The discipline relies on the following four guiding principles:

The body is an integrated whole — All parts of your body are interconnected and each part plays an integral role to its harmonious functioning as a whole; this includes your mind and your emotions.

The body has a natural self-healing ability —Your body contains all the necessary instruments it needs to heal itself. It has the capacity to regenerate just like nature does. In some cases it may appear that the self-healing ability is decreasing, however, in most cases, it is not completely lost. Read More


Don’t Eat All the Cucumbers!

Cucumbers are a wonderful food. Though about 90% water, they contain an impressive array of vitamins — C, A, K, B5 — and minerals — potassium, magnesium, manganese — which fight inflammation and infection, produce energy, and strengthen bone and heart health. Recent studies have also shown that cucs contain powerful lignans that contribute to reduced risk of some cancers, including, prostate, breast, uterus, and ovarian and they are loaded with other phytonutrients, called cucurbitacins, known as strong inhibitors of cancer cell development.

But there are ways other than eating to enjoy the benefits of cucumbers. This member of the gourd family (technically a fruit because of its seed-bearing structure that develops from the ovary of a flowering plant, whereas vegetables come from other parts, like stems, roots, leaves) is a real treat for the skin! Read More

Tai Chi and Your Brain

You may have seen them in the park: small groups of people in loose clothing doing weird slow motion poses. This is not some fanatical dance cult! It’s tai chi chuan, an increasingly popular, moderate form of exercise that combines deep, diaphragmatic breathing with flowing, dancelike stances — a surprisingly effective workout for all ages.

Many recent studies have shown that tai chi improves balance, leg strength, cardiovascular endurance, pulse rate, muscular flexibility, immune function, sleep quality, happiness, self-esteem, and cognitive skills like the capacity to concentrate and multitask. Even cows appear to benefit: farmers from a British dairy organization that promotes organic milk perform Tai Chi in front of cows because they believe it “can bring an additional spiritual uplift to their herds, fields and farmyards.”

new study revealed especially impactful results on the brains of older adults who had been practicing this gentle martial art for several years. Read More

Easy Miso Soup

After your tai chi class, how about a healthy soup from Japan? Miso, along with natto and tempeh, are fermented soy products, a process that makes nutrients readily available. Miso provides beneficial probiotics, improves digestion, helps normalize blood pressure, has anticancer effects, and supplies important nutrients, like copper, manganese, Vitamin K. Unfermented soy (soy milk, tofu, TVP, soy cheese, soybean oil, edamame, etc.) is a very different product. It inhibits enzymatic function and may contain high levels of toxins and anti-nutrients. It is not recommended, which is why we do not add tofu to this recipe.

2 cups pure water (preferably distilled)
¼ cup chopped green chard, bok choy, collard greens, kale, cut in thin strips
¼ cup chopped green onion
1 ½ – 2 Tbsp. organic white miso paste (fermented soy bean paste)
1/2 sheet (1/8 cup) nori (dried seaweed), cut into large rectangles

  1. Place water in a medium saucepan and bring to a low simmer.
  2. Add nori and simmer 5-7 minutes.
  3. Meanwhile, put 1 1/2 Tbsp. miso into a small bowl, add a little hot water and mix until smooth. Then add to the soup and stir. This ensures no clumps.
  4. Add greens and onion to the pot and simmer for another 5 minutes or so. Adjust seasoning, add more miso if desired. Serve warm for a soothing, gastric-friendly dish. Often served at the beginning of a meal to calm the body/mind and “awaken” the taste buds.

Banana

March 12, 2018

Bananas were cultivated in India 4,000 years ago. In 1482, the Portuguese found the banana on the Guinea coast and carried it with them to the Canary Islands. Spanish priests are credited with having introduced this fruit to tropical America when they arrived as missionaries in the sixteenth century. Now, the banana can be found in all tropical countries.

The first known species of banana is the plantain. or cooking banana. The plantain has a salmon-colored and gummy texture, and a slightly acid taste. This fruit has been a substitute for bread or potatoes in many countries, and is slowly being introduced to the United States.

Bananas are usually harvested green, shipped green, and ripened by wholesale fruit jobbers in air-conditioned ripening rooms. The Gros Michel variety is the most popular of the many varieties. It produces the largest and most compact bunch, which makes it easier to ship. The thick skin of the banana protects the soft fruit.

Other popular varieties of banana are the Claret, or red banana, which has a gummy flesh; the Lady Finger, which is the smallest variety, but has a delicate, sweet flavor; and the Apple, which has an acid flavor and tastes somewhat like a mellow apple.

In the tropics, bananas are often cooked and served with beans, rice, or tortillas. In the Latin American countries, the ripe banana is sometimes dried in the sun in much the same manner as figs and raisins. They arc often sliced when ripe and left in the sun until they are covered with a coating of white, sugary powder that arises from their own juices.

The banana has no particular growing season. A ripe banana is firm, with a plump texture, strong peel, and no trace of green on the skin. A skin that is flecked with brown means the fruit is good.

Fully ripe bananas are composed of 76 percent water, 20 percent sugar, and 12 percent starch.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

The sugars in the banana are readily assimilated, and they contain many vitamins and minerals, and a great deal of fiber. They are excellent for young children and infants and are good in reducing diets because they satisfy the appetite and are low in fat.

Because they are so soft, they are good for persons who have intestinal disturbances, and for convalescents. Bananas feed the natural acidophilus bacteria of the bowel, and their high potassium content benefits the muscular system.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (edible portion)

Calories: 299

Protein: 3.6 g

Fat: 0.6 g

Carbohydrates: 69.9 g

Calcium: 24 mg

Phosphorus: 85 mg

Iron: 1.8 mg

Vitamin A: 1,300 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.27 mg

Riboflavin: 0.19 mg

Niacin: 1.7 mg

Ascorbic acid: 29 mg

Asparagus

March 5, 2018

The ancient Phoenicians brought asparagus to the Greeks and Romans. It was described in the sixteenth century by the English writer Evelyn as “sperage” and he said that it was “delicious eaten raw with oil and vinegar.”

When selecting asparagus, choose spears that are fresh, firm, and tender (not woody or pithy), with tips that are tightly closed. Watch for signs of decay, such as rot and mold. If the tip of the spear appears wilted, the asparagus is really too old to be good. From the tip to all but an inch of the base, the stalk should be tender. Angular stalks indicate that they are tough and stringy.

Store asparagus wrapped in a damp cloth or waxed paper, and keep refrigerated until you are ready to use it. Asparagus loses its edible quality when it is subjected to dryness and heat, which reduce the sugar content and increase the fiber content.

Asparagus is a perennial herb, and is a member of the Lily of the Valley family. It can be served hot, with drawn butter; cold, in a salad; in soups; and as a sandwich filling or flavoring.

The season for asparagus is February through July, and the peak months are April, May, and June. Early spring asparagus is from California; late spring asparagus is shipped in early April or late May from Maryland, Delaware, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, Michigan, Illinois, and Iowa. Green asparagus is the most nutritious. Some varieties are green-tipped with white butts, and some are entirely white. Most of the white variety is canned.

Asparagus is best when cooked in stainless steel, on low heat. This leaves the shoots tender and retains their original color. If cooked with the tips up, more vitamin B1 and C will be preserved. The liquid can be saved and used in vegetable cocktails.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Asparagus acts as a general stimulant to the kidneys, but can be irritating to the kidneys if taken in excess or if there is extreme kidney inflammation. Because it contains chlorophyll, it is a good blood builder.

Green asparagus tips are high in vitamin A, while the white tips have almost none. This food leaves an alkaline ash in the body. Because they have a lot of roughage, only the tips can be used in a soft diet. They are high in water content and are considered a good vegetable in an elimination diet. Many of the elements that build the liver, kidneys, skin, ligaments, and bones are found in green asparagus. Green asparagus also helps in the formation of red blood corpuscles.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 90

Protein: 7.5g

Fat: .7g

Carbohydrates: 13.1g

Calcium: 71mg

Phosphorus: 211mg

Iron: 3.11mg

Vitamin A: 3,430 I.U.

Thiamine: .54mg

Riboflavin: .59mg

Niacin: 3.9mg

Ascorbic Acid: 113mg

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