Foundation for Advancement in Cancer Therapy

Non-Traditional Approaches to
the Theories, Treatments and Prevention of Cancer

Celery

August 27, 2018

Celeriac is probably more commonly known as celery root. It is a turnip-rooted vegetable, and the root forms a solid knob just below the soil surface.

Italian and Swiss botanists gave the first description of celeriac about 1600. It became popular in Europe in the eighteenth century, but has never been popular in England or the United States.

Most of the United States’ supply of celery root is grown in California. It is available September to April.

When selecting this vegetable, choose roots that are firm. Press the tops of the roots to check for internal rot.

Celery root is usually boiled and eaten alone or in salads. To store, wrap it is plastic wrap and keep it very cool.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Celery root is high is phosphorus and potassium. It is beneficial to the lymphatic, nervous, and urinary systems.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 156

Protein: 7.0 g

Fat: 1.2 g

Carbohydrates: 33.2 g

Calcium: 168 mg

Phosphorus: 449 mg

Iron: 2.3 mg

Vitamin A: 0

Thiamine: 0.20 mg

Riboflavin: 0.11 mg

Niacin: 1.2 mg

Ascorbic acid: 30 mg

Radish

August 20, 2018

The radish is a member of the mustard family, but is also related to cabbage, cauliflower, kale, and turnips. After this vegetable was introduced into Middle Asia from China in prehistoric times, many forms of the plant were developed. Radishes are a cool season crop, and the peak period is April through July. The American varieties can be used for both roots and tops in salads, and cooked.

A good-quality radish is well-formed, smooth, firm, tender, and crisp, with a mild flavor. The condition of the leaves does not always indicate quality, for they may be fresh, bright, and green, while the radishes may be spongy and strong, or the leaves may be wilted and damaged in handling, while the radishes themselves may be fresh and not at all pithy. Old, slow-growing radishes are usually strong in flavor, with a woody flesh. Slight finger pressure will disclose sponginess or pithiness.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Radishes are strongly diuretic and stimulate the appetite and digestion. The juice of raw radishes is helpful in catarrhal conditions. The mustard oil content of the radish makes it good for expelling gallstones from the bladder.

A good cocktail can be made with radishes. This cocktail will eliminate catarrhal congestion in the body, especially in the sinuses. It will also aid in cleansing the gall bladder and liver. To make this cocktail, combine one-third cucumber juice, one-third radish juice, and one-third green pepper juice. If desired, apple juice may be added to make this more palatable. An excellent cocktail for nervous disorders is made from radish juice, prune juice, and rice polishings. This drink is high in vitamin B and aids in the flow of bile.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 49

Protein: 2.9g

Fat: .3g

Carbohydrates: 10.3g

Calcium: 86mg

Phosphorus: 89mg

Iron: 2.9mg

Vitamin A: 30 I.U.

Thiamine: .09mg

Riboflavin: .09mg

Niacin: .9mg

Ascorbic Acid: 74mg

Cucumber

August 13, 2018

The cucumber is said to be native to India, although plant explorers have never been able to discover a wild prototype. Cucumbers have been cultivated for thousands of years, and records indicate that they were used as food in ancient Egypt, and were a popular vegetable with the Greeks and Romans. The cucumber is one of the few vegetables mentioned in the Bible.

In 200 B.C. a Chinese ambassador traveled as far as Persia, where he saw cucumbers for the first time. Later, he brought them

to China. At a later date, an English sea captain, returning from the West Indies, brought back pickled gherkins to Mrs. Samuel Pepys. Shortly after this period, cucumbers were grown in England.

Occasionally, in a collection of old glass, a plain glass tube or cylinder resembling a lamp chimney with parallel sides will tum up. This may be an English cucumber glass, a device used at one time to make cucumbers grow straight. George Stephenson, inventor of the locomotive, is credited with its invention.

Florida is the principal producer of cucumbers, supplying al­ most one-third of the total United States commercial crop for mar­ ket. California, North and South Carolina, New Jersey, and New

York are also large producers.

Cucumbers for slicing should be firm, fresh, bright, well­ shaped, and of good medium or dark green color. The flesh should be firm and the seeds immature. Withered or shriveled cucumbers should be avoided. Their flesh is generally tough or rubbery and somewhat bitter. Over maturity is indicated by a generally over­ grown, puffy appearance. The color of over mature cucumbers is generally dull and not infrequently yellowed, the flesh is tough, the seeds hard, and the flesh in the seed cavity almost jelly-like. Cu­ cumbers in this condition should not be used for slicing. Some varieties are of solid green color when mature enough for slicing. but usually a little whitish color will be found at the tip, with a tendency to extend in lines along the seams, where they advance from pale green to white, and finally yellow with age.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Cucumbers are alkaline, non-starchy vegetables. They are a cooling food, especially when used in vegetable juices. Long ago it wasbelieved that people would die from eating the peelings, but this is not true.

Cucumbers are wonderful as a digestive aid, and have a purify­ing effect on the bowel. It is not necessary to soak them in salt water. Serve them thinly sliced, raw, in sour cream, lemon juice, or yogurt for a delightful summer dish. They have a marvelous effect on the skin, and the old saying ”keeping cool as a cucumber” is literally true because of its cooling effect on the blood.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 39

Protein: 2.2 g

Fat: 0.3 g

Carbohydrates: 8.6 g

Calcium: 32 mg

Phosphorus: 67 mg

Iron: 1.0 mg

Vitamin A: 0 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.11 mg

Riboflavin: 0.14 mg

Niacin: 0.7 mg

Ascorbic Acid: 27 mg

Pineapple

August 6, 2018

Filed under: Foods of the Week, What's New? — admin @ 5:56 am

Pineapples were cultivated in the West Indies long before Columbus visited there. But after his voyage to the island of Guadeloupe, it was recorded in Spain that Columbus had “discovered” the fruit. The pineapple is native to tropical America and was known to the Indians as na-na, meaning fragrance, and to the Spanish explorers as piiia, because of its resemblance to a pine cone.

History does not record how pineapples first reached Hawaii. For many years they grew wild. Then, a young Bostonian started commercial production of them there in 1901 on twelve acres of land. His company has enlarged to the present 25,000 acres. The plant of this fruit grows from two to four feet high, with a rosette of stiff, sword-shaped leaves growing from its base. Out of the rosette center grows a single, fleshy, scaly-coated fruit that is four to ten inches long. A cluster of sword-shaped leaves surmounts the fruit.

Pineapples are grown in many parts of the world, but the United States is supplied principally from Cuba, Mexico, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico. They may be obtained all year long, but are most abundant from March through July. The peak months are June and July.

A ripe pineapple in quality condition has a fresh, clean appearance, a distinctive darkish orange-yellow color, and a decided fragrance. The “eyes” of the fruit are flat and almost hollow. If the fruit is mature it is usually heavier in proportion to its size. To test for ripeness, pull at the spikes. If they pull out easily, the fruit is ripe; discolored areas, or soft spots, are an indication of bruised fruit.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

High in vitamin C, the pineapple is considered to be a protective fruit. It is wonderful for constipation and poor digestion. The pineapple helps digest proteins, and can be used in elimination diets. It leaves an alkaline ash in the body. Pineapple is thought to have a certain amount of iodine because it grows near the ocean. When buying canned pineapple, make sure it is unsweetened. Pineapple goes well with fruit and nuts, and is good to eat on a fruit diet.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories 123

Protein 1g

Fat 0.5g

Carbohydrates 33g

Calcium 39mg Niacin 0.5mg

Phosphorus 19mg Ascorbic acid 40mg

Iron 1.2mg

Vitamin A: 170 I.U.

Thiamine 0.20mg

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