Foundation for Advancement in Cancer Therapy

Non-Traditional Approaches to
the Theories, Treatments and Prevention of Cancer

Chicory

September 24, 2018

Chicory is closely related to endive. There are many varieties to chicory. They include green chicory, which is leafy; and radicchio, also a root chicory, which is red and white. Chicory is best when tossed in salad with other vegetables.

Green chicory is cultivated primarily in Europe, although varieties grow wild in Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Unite States. Belgium endive is primarily cultivated in Belgium and is prized for its delicate flavor. Radicchio is native to Italy and primarily grows there.

Radicchio is often sold with the root attached. If possible the root should be eaten because it is very good.

When selecting chicory, look for a fresh, crisp, green vegetable. Belgium endive, which looks like a tightly wrapped stalk, should be white or near white. Radicchio should be crisp and fresh.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Chicory is an alkaline food that is good in elimination diets. It is high in vitamin C. Tea made from chicory roots and used as an enema is a wonderful remedy for increasing peristaltic action and getting the liver to work.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (greens only)

Calories: 74

Protein: 6.7 g

Fat: 1.1 g

Carbohydrates: 14.1 g

Calcium: 320 mg

Phosphorus: 149 mg

Iron: 3.3 mg

Vitamin A: 14,880 I.U.

Thiamine: .22 mg

Riboflavin: .37 mg

Niacin: 1.9 mg

Ascorbic acid: —

Lima Beans

September 17, 2018

Records found in old Peruvian tombs show that lima beans have been around for centuries. European explorers found this vegetable in Lima, Peru, and this is where the name comes from. Lima beans probably originated in Guatemala, and are still grown in tropical regions.

The flourishing dry lima bean industry of southern California seems to have started in 1865. In this year, Henry Lewis bought a few hundred pounds of lima bean seeds from a tramp steamer from Peru that had put in port at Santa Barbara. Most of the dry lima bean crop is produced along the Pacific coast from Santa Ana to Santa Barbara, and Florida is also a large producer of lima beans. The peak months of supply are July through October.

There are two types of lima beans. The large “potato” type have large pods and are fleshy and not likely to split at maturity. The baby lima bean is an annual plant that matures early. The pods are small and numerous, and are likely to split open at maturity.

When selecting lima beans, look for quality pods that are fresh, bright green in color, and well-filled. Lima beans, when shelled, should be plump with tender skins, green to greenish white. The skin should puncture when it is tested. Hard, tough skins mean that the bean is over mature, and these beans usually lack flavor. Lima beans are often called “butter” beans.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Lima beans can be used either dry or fresh. Fresh lima beans are alkaline and have high protein value. Dry limas are hard to digest, and the dry skin is irritating to an inflamed digestive system. Lima beans are beneficial to the muscular system.

Lima beans are excellent as a puree in soft diets for stomach disorders. They make a tasty baked dish, such as bean loaf. One pound of lima beans contains as many nutrients as two pounds of meat!

Dry beans have high protein content of almost 18%, but fresh beans are only 4% protein. The kidney bean and navy bean are very similar in makeup and therapeutic value to the lima bean.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (unshelled)

Calories: 234

Protein: 13.6 g

Fat: 1.5 g

Carbohydrates: 42.8 g

Calcium: 115 mg

Phosphorus: 288 mg

Iron: 4.2 mg

Vitamin A: 520 I.U.

Thiamine: .38 mg

Riboflavin: .21 mg

Niacin: 2.5 mg

Ascorbic acid: 48 mg

Rethinking Cancer Newsletter #67

September 10, 2018

Filed under: Rethinking Cancer Newsletters — admin @ 9:50 am

According to a recent major international study, many women with early-stage breast cancer, who are being prescribed chemotherapy under current medical standards, do not need it!

While this sounds like a breakthrough and will, no doubt, allow thousands of patients to avoid devastating toxic protocols, it is, by no means, to use a familiar phrase, “rethinking cancer.” For well over a century, conventional orthodoxy has defined cancer as the tumor which simply appears for some unknowable reason. Therefore, the answer to cancer has been, and remains, the destruction of the mass using procedures, such as chemotherapy and radiation, which, indeed, kill cancer cells, but can severely harm healthy cells and impair normal body function. These treatments have no intrinsic healing properties. They can buy some time, but the damage can be permanent and, too often, the cancer returns because the body’s natural healing capacity has been so compromised.

The Biorepair approach views cancer as a systemic problem. The tumor is a symptom of a biochemical breakdown which has resulted in the production of abnormal cells. This can be corrected with a comprehensive, non-toxic metabolic program which re-balances and strengthens all body functions in order to produce healthy cells and restore well being. Without correcting the cause of the problem, you can annihilate all cancer cells at any given time, but the body will continue producing abnormal cells. It becomes a game of whack-a-mole.

So, yes, it’s good that early stage breast cancers, which would likely never develop into serious disease, will not longer be treated with chemo, though Tamoxifen and other hormone treatments will continue and have their own problems. Sadly, in all cases, the primary goal of conventional cancer treatment remains the destruction of cancer cells, instead of the repair of the whole body.

To your health!

Foundation for Advancement in Cancer Therapy (F.A.C.T.)

P.S. For more unconventional wisdom, may we suggest our latest book, Healing Cancer — The Unconventional Wisdom of Ruth Sackman (now also available on Amazon). Ruth, co-founder and former president of F.A.C.T. for 38 years, helped literally thousands of people regain and maintain good health. Also, we hope you’ll take a look at our film, Rethinking Cancer now streaming internationally on Gaia.com, iTunes and Amazon and stay in the loop with us on Twitter, Facebook and our YouTube channel!

New 5G Wireless Technology: Boon or Bane?

We all love “the latest thing.” But when it comes to dazzling innovations in wireless technology, is there such a “thing” as too much speed, coverage and responsiveness for our own good? READ MORE

This Farm Is Medicine

Murray Provine used to be your typical Type A kind of guy — a financially successful, traveling executive with a stressed out no-exercise lifestyle, fueled with the standard American diet.
Everything changed, however, after Murray was diagnosed with prostate cancer. READ MORE

Why a Little Bitter Is Better

Most people are naturally drawn to the taste off sweet. Perhaps this sends a message to the brain that you will get energy to carry on. But a bitter taste emits a very different signal — on guard, this could be poison! Here’s the bitter truth: bitter foods in small doses have tremendous health benefits. READ MORE

Roasted Radishes & Leeks with Thyme

Here’s a pleasant way to get your bitters:

2 bunches radishes (approx. 1 lb.), cut in half if small, or quartered, if large
2 tablespoons butter from grass-fed animals — let soften at room temperature
½ teaspoon unrefined salt (seasalt, Celtic, Himalayan)
¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 large leek, white and light green part — halved and sliced thin
1 teaspoon fresh thyme, chopped fine or ¼ teaspoon dried

  1. Preheat oven to 450° F.
  2. Mix radishes, 1 tablespoon butter, salt and pepper in a bowl, then spread out on a large roasting pan.
  3. Roast for 10 minutes, then stir in the leek slices.
  4. Continue roasting about 10-15 minutes more — until the radishes are lightly browned and tender.
  5. Transfer to a serving dish. Stir in the thyme and remaining tablespoon of butter.
  6. Serve warm as an appetizer or side dish.

Cabbage

Cabbage was widely grown in ancient China. In fact, the workers on the Great Wall so many years ago were fed on cabbage and rice. When winter came, wine was added to the cabbage to preserve it, producing a sour cabbage pleasant to the taste, which didn’t spoil. A thousand years later the Tartars under Genghis Khan conquered China and carried sour cabbage with them as they overran other parts of the world. The vitamin C in cabbage was enough to prevent scurvy, the deficiency disease which killed many soldiers on long marches in ancient times.

When the Tartars came to Eastern Europe they were still eating sour cabbage, but they were preserving it with salt rather than wine. The Russians, Poles and Austrians tasted this food of their conquerors and liked it. The Austrians named it sauerkraut. The Dutch brought cole slaw to America, its name deriving from kool for cabbage and sla for salad: cabbage salad.

Raw cabbage has been known from antiquity as a remedy for drunkenness. Eating cabbage with vinegar before a drinking bout and after a feast would prevent one from feeling too strongly the effects of the wine or beer.

Pliny, the Roman naturalist, thought the best cabbages were those tiny heads that grow on the stalk after the original big head is picked. Gardeners who leave the cabbage stalk in the ground usually find these a few weeks later.

Down through the centuries cabbage has been used for just about every purpose industrious herb doctors could experiment with: chronic coughs, colic, constipation, dysentery, toothache, gout, pains in the liver, deafness, insomnia and many other ailments. Contrarily, some writers on herb medicines declared that cabbage should be avoided because of its tendency to cause flatulence.

Today we know that long cooking produces the sulfur compounds which, in the past, gave cabbage its bad name. Heat, soaking in water or cooking for too long a time break down the sulfur compounds and create the digestive problems some people have with cabbage. Serve cabbage raw if you would get the most out of it, nutritionally speaking. If you must cook it, make it brief—no more than a few minutes in a tiny bit of water. Shred or chop it finely before cooking, so that this short cooking time will be enough.

Cabbage is one of our best sources of vitamin C—raw, it may contain up to 50 milligrams per serving. It also contains considerable potassium and vitamin A. One half cup contains only 10 calories, so it is an excellent “filler” food for the calorie-counter. A dressing of lemon juice or vinegar adds almost no calories. Mayonnaise or other oily salad dressing is suitable if you are counting carbohydrate units rather than calories. When you shred cabbage for slaw for cooking, prepare it as soon as possible before eating. It loses vitamin C with every additional moment it stands before eating. Keep the cabbage head in the refrigerator and, if you don’t use it all at one meal, cover the cut side with waxed paper or foil to keep out all air.

Radish

September 4, 2018

The radish is a member of the mustard family, but is also related to cabbage, cauliflower, kale, and turnips. After this vegetable was introduced into Middle Asia from China in prehistoric times, many forms of the plant were developed. Radishes are a cool season crop, and the peak period is April through July. The American varieties can be used for both roots and tops in salads, and cooked.

A good-quality radish is well-formed, smooth, firm, tender, and crisp, with a mild flavor. The condition of the leaves does not always indicate quality, for they may be fresh, bright, and green, while the radishes may be spongy and strong, or the leaves may be wilted and damaged in handling, while the radishes themselves may be fresh and not at all pithy. Old, slow-growing radishes are usually strong in flavor, with a woody flesh. Slight finger pressure will disclose sponginess or pithiness.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Radishes are strongly diuretic and stimulate the appetite and digestion. The juice of raw radishes is helpful in catarrhal conditions. The mustard oil content of the radish makes it good for expelling gallstones from the bladder.

A good cocktail can be made with radishes. This cocktail will eliminate catarrhal congestion in the body, especially in the sinuses. It will also aid in cleansing the gall bladder and liver. To make this cocktail, combine one-third cucumber juice, one-third radish juice, and one-third green pepper juice. If desired, apple juice may be added to make this more palatable. An excellent cocktail for nervous disorders is made from radish juice, prune juice, and rice polishings. This drink is high in vitamin B and aids in the flow of bile.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 49

Protein: 2.9g

Fat: .3g

Carbohydrates: 10.3g

Calcium: 86mg

Phosphorus: 89mg

Iron: 2.9mg

Vitamin A: 30 I.U.

Thiamine: .09mg

Riboflavin: .09mg

Niacin: .9mg

Ascorbic Acid: 74mg

Watch Online

Watch on Amazon Video Watch on iTunes

Watch on DVD

Get the Book

Rethinking Cancer, by Ruth Sackman, is an excellent companion book to the film. Learn More

Newsletter signup

Bookmark and Share