Foundation for Advancement in Cancer Therapy

Non-Traditional Approaches to
the Theories, Treatments and Prevention of Cancer

Pumpkin

October 29, 2018

The pumpkin, along with other squashes, is native to Americas. The stems, seeds, and parts of the fruit of the pumpkin have been found in the ruins of the ancient cliff dwellings in the southwestern part of the United States. Other discoveries in these ruins indicate that the pumpkin may even have been grown by the “basket makers”, whose civilization precedes that of the cliff dwellers, and who were probably the first agriculturists in North America.

Present varieties of pumpkin have been traced back to the days of Indian tribes. One variety, The Cushaw, was being grown by the Indians in 1586.

Botanically, a pumpkin is a squash. The popular term pumpkin has become a symbol, or tradition, at Halloween and Thanksgiving. The tradition dates as far back as the first colonial settlers.

Pumpkin can be served as a boiled or baked vegetable and as afilling for pies or in custards. It also makes a good ingredient for cornbread.

Pumpkins are grown throughout the United States and are used in or near the producing area. They are classed as stock feed and pie types, some serving both purposes. The principal producers are Indiana, Illinois, New Jersey, Maryland, Iowa, and California. They may be found in stores from late August to March, the peak months being October through December.

Pumpkins of quality should be heavy for their size and free of blemishes, with a hard rind. Watch for decay if the flesh has been bruised or otherwise injured. Decay may appear as a water-soaked area, sometimes covered with a dark, mold-like growth.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Pumpkins are very high in potassium and sodium and have a moderately low carbohydrate content. They are alkaline in reaction and are affair source of vitamins Band C. Pumpkins are good in soft diets.

Pumpkin can be used in pudding or it can be liquefied. One of the best ways to serve pumpkin is to bake it. Pumpkin seeds and onions mixed together with a little soy milk make a great remedy for parasitic worms in the digestive tract. To make this remedy, liquefy three tablespoons of pumpkin seeds that have been soaked for three hours, one-half of a small onion, one half cupsoy milk, and one teaspoon of honey. Take this amount three times daily, three days in a row.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (without rind and seeds)

Calories: 83

Protein: 3.8 g

Fat: 0.3 g

Carbohydrates: 20.6 g

Calcium: 66 mg

Phosphorus: 138 mg

Iron: 2.5 mg

Vitamin A: 5,080 I.U.

Thiamine: .15 mg

Riboflavin: .35 mg

Niacin: 1.8 mg

Ascorbic acid: 30 mg

Mushroom

October 22, 2018

The Pharaohs of Egypt monopolized mushrooms for their own use. They thought they were too delicate to be eaten by common people. The Egyptian potentates did not understand the sudden, overnight appearance of mushrooms, and consequently believed they grew magically. By the first century B.C., the mushroom had gained such a fine reputation among epicures of the Roman Empire that the poet Horace celebrated its goodness in verse. The Romans called mushrooms “food of the gods” and served them on festive occasions. They were thought to provide warriors with unusual strength.

Up to the seventeenth century, only the wild types of mushrooms found growing in meadows and pastures were known. During the reign of Louis XIV, mushroom · growing was introduced in France. Parisian market gardeners experimented to learn the secrets of successful mushroom culture. By 1749 mushroom beds were cultivated in caves and cellars, and the results were much better’ than ·when they were grown outdoors. The British were raising mushrooms in hothouses sometime before 1700.

The commercial production of mushrooms in the United States started in the late 1890s when a group of florists in Chester County, Pennsylvania started growing them under the benches in their greenhouses. The greatest event in the history of mushroom culture in the United States occurred in 1926 when a farmer found a clump of pure white mushrooms in a bed of uniformly cream-colored fungi. Most of the mushrooms grown today are descendants of this white clump.

Mushrooms are now cultivated in specially constructed buildings that are windowless and in which temperature and humidity are controlled. Mushroom spawn is cultivated by laboratory scientists who sell it to the growers for inoculation of the mushroom beds. Such precise methods are necessary to provide pure spawn of known characteristics.

The introduction of mushrooms into gravies, sauces, soups, and other dishes adds zest and flavor, but they also are a fine food when served as a vegetable . Mushrooms require very little preparation. Wash, cut off the bottom portion of the stem if it has dried, and either slice the caps and stems or leave whole, depending on the method of cooking. Butter a deep pan, cut up the mushrooms so they fill the pan to a depth of about two inches, and simmer over a low· heat until the mushrooms are covered with their own juice. This may take more than ten minutes. Then, cook more briskly for about five minutes, until tender. Overcooking toughens mushrooms.

Green plants can get their food by manufacturing it in their leaves from air, water, sunshine , and soil nutrients, but mushrooms cannot do this. They have no leaves, so they must depend on green plants to make their food for them, and they cannot use it unless it is in the process of decay. Mushrooms propagate from spores, a brownish powder shed from the rounded head which, when ripe, opens like a parasol. However, cultivated mushrooms are not reproduced from spores, but from fine strands of mycelium, which are root like growths that spread through organic material. Most wild mushrooms are not poisonous, but unless you know the difference, you should leave them alone. It is not possible to tell by taste which mushrooms are dangerous. Some very unpalatable mushrooms are harmless, while others that have an agreeable taste are poisonous.

Scientists today say that darkness is not the primary requisite for growing mushrooms. They say that, for healthy growth, all mushrooms need constant temperature and protection against drafts.

The term mushroom refers to a large number of different species and varieties of fleshy fungi. Only one species is usually cultivated and that is Agaricus Campestris, which has a straight stem, a smooth cap of a shade varying from white or ivory to brown, and gills of different shades of pink. Most of the cultivated mushrooms grown in the United States are of the white variety variously known as Snow White, White King, White Queen, etc. This variety is very prolific and is preferred by nearly all markets because of its attractive, clean, white appearance.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Prior to the mid-1940s, all you needed to do to work up a hot argument among nutritionists was to say the word “mushrooms.” Scientists’ assertions about the food value of mushrooms ranged from calling them’ ‘vegetable beefsteak” full of proteins, to declaring that they had no protein and very little else. This confusion arose partly from the fact that mushrooms of many species were investigated and the results reported under a common head. A June 1946 report by William B. Eccelen, Jr. and Carl R. Fellers of the Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment Station stated that cultivated mushrooms of the Agaricus Campestris type compare favorably in food value to many fresh fruits and vegetables.

Mushrooms are among the few rich organic sources of germanium, which increases oxygen efficiency of the body, counteracts the effects of pollutants, and increases resistance to disease. Because mushrooms are extremely low in calories, they are useful in reducing diets. They are also a good source of vitamin B.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 123

Protein: 11.9 g

Fat: 1.2 g

Carbohydrates: 19.4 g

Calcium: 26 mg

Phosphorus: 510 mg

Iron: 3.5 mg

Vitamin A: trace

Thiamine: 0.41 mg

Riboflavin: 2.02 mg

Niacin: 18.6 mg

Ascorbic acid: 14 mg

Blueberry

October 15, 2018

Blueberries originally grew wild in North America, and in many places they still do. By 1910 there were at least two varieties being cultivated for market. Breeding and selection have made these berries popular, but wild fruit is also marketed.

Blueberries are available from early May through August, and the peak month is July. Canada and the northeastern United States produce the greatest amount of blueberries, because they grow best when the days are long and the nights cool. In any one area the blueberry season usually lasts from six to seven weeks.

Quality blueberries are plump, look fresh, clean, and dry, are fairly uniform in size, and are a deep blue, black, or purplish color. Overripe berries are dull in appearance, soft and watery, and moldy.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Blueberries contain silicon, which helps rejuvenate the pancreas. They are said to be good for diabetic conditions.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 310

Protein: 2.9g

Fat: 2.1g

Carbohydrates: 63.8g

Calcium: 63mg

Phosphorus: 54mg

Iron: 3.6mg

Vitamin A: 420 I.U.

Thiamine: —

Riboflavin: —

Niacin: —

Ascorbic Acid: 58mg

Swiss Chard

October 8, 2018

Swiss chard is a member of the beet family. Unlike most members of this family, chard does not develop an enlarged, fleshy root. Instead it has large leaves with thickened midribs, and both ribs and leaves are edible. The roots are hard and woody. Swiss chard is a temperate zone biennial that withstands rather severe winters. It is of the same species as garden beets, mangel-wurzels, and sugar beets, and readily inter-crosses with them through airborne pollination.

Chard is the beet of the ancients. Aristotle wrote about red chard and Theophrastus mentioned light-green and dark-green types of chard in the fourth century B.C. The Romans called this plant “beta”, and the Arabs called it “selg”. But chard was used as a potherb in the Mediterranean lands, Asia Minor, the Caucasus, and the Near East, long before Roman times. Wild beets grow widely in these areas.

Beets of the type that produce large, fleshy, edible roots were unknown before the Christian era. The ancients apparently used the root of the wild beet or chard for medicinal purposes only. Chard has been used in Europe for as long as there are definite records of food plants.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Swiss chard contains a great deal of vitamin C, vitamin A, potassium, sodium, and calcium. It is best not to cook it for a long time, because its vitamin content will decrease.

This vegetable is low in calories and high in alkaline ash. It is good when combined with other vegetables in salads, and helps ward off colds. It is beneficial to the digestive system, because it contains many of the vitamins and minerals essential to its operation.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 82

Protein: 5.5 g

Fat: 0.8 g

Carbohydrates: 17.2 g

Calcium: 410 mg

Phosphorus: 140 mg

Iron: 9.8 mg

Vitamin A: 10,920 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.22 mg

Riboflavin: 0.28 mg

Niacin: 1.7 mg

Ascorbic acid: 148 mg

Apple

October 1, 2018

One of the first things a child learns is the alphabet, and almost always, “A is for apple.” The apple has been around for so long that it can be called the first fruit. Hieroglyphic writings found in: the pyramids and tombs of the ancient Egyptians indicate that they used the apple as both a food and a medicine. It not only has been at the beginning of alphabet songs, but has been the center of legends, folklore, and even religion, for thousands of. years, from Adam and Eve to Johnny Appleseed.

The people of the United States love apples. The state of Washington produces 32,000,000 boxes of apples a year. Washington’s orchards supposedly began from a single tree that was planted in 1827 from a seed given to Captain Simpson of the Hudson Bay Company by a young woman from London. That tree is still standing!

Years ago, apples were used to relieve gout, bilious constitutions, skin eruptions, and nerves. They are so popular around the world that they have all kinds of superstitions and traditions at· tached to them. The peasants of Westphalia used apples mixed with saffron as a cure for jaundice. There is also a legend in Devonshire, England, that an apple rubbed on a wart will cure it. On Easter morning, peasants in a province of Prussia ate an apple to insure against fever. The Turks gave the apple the power of restoring youth.

There are so many varieties of apples that almost ai1YOne can find an apple to suit his palate. Since there are summer, winter, and fall varieties, apples can be had fresh all year around.

Today, doctors use apple therapy for stubborn cases of diarrhea in patients of all ages, including babies. Raw apple is scraped in very fine slices or used in a specially prepared concentrate. This treatment is often used for what is called the “lazy colon,” and is also good for babies who are ready to begin a solid diet. Because so many of the essential vitamins and minerals in apples contain a predigested form of fruit sugar, it is an ideal fruit for infants and invalids.

When you cook apples, be sure to do so over a very low flame. It is best ·to cook them in a stainless steel utensil, so that the delicate pectin, vitamins, and minerals will be preserved as much as possible. Apples, of course, are best raw and are good in various kinds of salads.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Apples are an alkaline food. They are also an eliminative food, and contain pectin, which has the ability to take up excess water in the intestines and make a soft bulk that acts as a mild, nonirritating stimulant. This stimulant helps the peristaltic movement and aids in natural bowel elimination.

The iron content of the apple is not high, but it has a property that helps the body absorb the iron in other foods, such as eggs and liver. It does contain a generous amount of calcium, and this calcium aids the system in absorbing the calcium in other foods.

Apples contain 50 percent more vitamin A than oranges. This vitamin helps ward off colds and other infections and promotes growth. It also keeps the eyes in good condition, and prevents night blindness.

Apples have an abundant supply of vitamins. They contain more vitamin G than almost any other fruit. This is called the “appetite vitamin,” and promotes digestion and growth. They are rich in vitamin C, which is a body normalizer and is essential in keeping bones and teeth sound. The vitamin that is so important in maintaining nerve health, vitamin B, is also found in apples.

Apples are good for low blood pressure and hardening of the arteries because they are powerful blood purifiers. They also benefit the lymphatic system.

The juice of apples is good for everyone. It can be used in a cleansing and reducing diet, but speeds up bowel action, and can produce gas if bowels are not moving well. Apple juice or concentrate added to water makes a solution that heals bowel irritation when given as an enema.

Raw apples should be used for homemade apple juice, which should be consumed immediately after preparation. Save the peelings for health tea, which is excellent for the kidneys. This tea is simply made from steeped apple peelings. It is especially tasty when a little honey has been added to it.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 258

Protein: 1.2g

Fat: 1.6 g

Carbohydrates: 59.6g

Calcium: 24 mg

Iron: 1.2 mg

Vitamin A: 360 I.U.

Thiamine: .15mg

Riboflavin: .08 mg

Ascorbic acid: 18 mg

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