Foundation for Advancement in Cancer Therapy

Non-Traditional Approaches to
the Theories, Treatments and Prevention of Cancer

Cranberry

December 17, 2018

Cranberries are native to the swampy regions of both the temperate and arctic zones of North America and Europe. Because they grow on slender, curved stalks, suggesting the neck of a crane, they were named “crane-berry”. or “cranberry”.

Long before the first colonists arrived in this country the cranberry was in common use by the Native Americans. The Pilgrims found them in the low marshes near the shore on the Cape Cod peninsula, and the women preserved them as a delicacy and served them with wild turkey at Thanksgiving and Christmas feasts.

Cultivation of the cranberry began early in the nineteenth cen­tury. The earliest records show that the business was largely carried on by retired seamen. Howe and McFarlin were the names of two of these men, and important varieties of cranberries are named for them. By 1870, a flourishing business had developed. It was re­corded in 1832 that ”Captain Henry Hall of Barnstable, Massachu­setts, had then cultivated the cranberry for twenty years,” and that “Mr. F. A. Hayden of Lincoln, Massachusetts, gathered from his farm in 1830, 400 bushels of cranberries which brought him in the Boston market $600.”

It has been said that the old clipper ships out of Gloucester, New Bedford, and the “Down East” ports carried supplies of raw cranberries in casks so that the sailors could help themselves. They did this to prevent scurvy, just as the sailors of England and South­ern Europe used limes to prevent this disease.

Cranberries grow on low, thick vines in a bog. The bogs are built on peat swamps that have been cleared, drained, and leveled. Water must be available and arranged so that the bog can be drained or flooded at the appropriate time. The surface, usually sand, on top of a subsoil that will hold moisture, must be level so the bog can be covered with water to a uniform depth when neces­sary. A cranberry bog takes three to five years to come into full production.

There are only five states that produce the greater supply of cranberries for market. They are, in order of production: Massa­chusetts, Wisconsin, New Jersey, Washington, and Oregon. The berries are marketed from September through March, and the peak months are October, November, and December.

The quality of the berry is determined by its roundness and size, and from its color, which varies from light to dark crimson, depending on the degree of maturity. Some varieties of cranberries are more olive-shaped or oblong. They have a fresh, plump appear­ance combined with a high luster and firmness. Avoid a shriveled, dull, soft-appearing berry.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Cranberries have a heavy acid content, and therefore should not be eaten too frequently. They increase the acidity of the urine. Be­ cause of their extremely tart taste, people drown them in sugar syrup, which makes them unfit for human consumption. They are best if cooked first; then add raisins and a little honey.

One of the finest therapeutic uses for cranberries is as a remedy for rectal disturbances, piles, hemorrhoids, and inflammation of the rectal pouch.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 218

Protein: 1.8g

Fat: 3.18g

Carbohydrates: 51.4g

Calcium: 63.5mg

Phosphorus: 50mg

Iron: 2.7mg

Vitamin A: 182I.U.

Thiamine: .13mg

Riboflavin: .09mg

Niacin: 0.45mg

Ascorbic acid: 55mg

Spinach

December 10, 2018

Spinach is a small, fleshy-leaved annual of the goose-foot family. It is a quick-maturing, cool season crop that is hardy and will live outdoors over winter throughout most of the area from New Jersey southward along the Atlantic Coast and in most parts of the lower South. Spinach has been both praised and abused. It has been popularized in the comic strips by the herculean feats of Popeye the sailor. On the other hand, Dr. Thurman B. Rice of the Indiana State Board of Health says, “If God had intended for us to eat spinach he would have flavored it with something.” But flavoring is a job for cooks. The way spinach is thrown in a pot with a large quantity of water and boiled for a half hour or more, it’s a wonder even Popeye relished it. Spinach should be cooked in a steamer with very little or no added water other than that clinging to the leaves after washing. If you insist on boiling it, again use only the water clinging to the leaves after washing, and cook in a covered pan for not more than ten minutes.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Spinach is an excellent source of both vitamins C and A, as well as iron, it also contains about 40 percent potassium. It leaves an alkaline ash in the body. Spinach is good for the lymphatic, urinary, and digestive systems. Spinach has a laxative effect and is wonderful in weight-loss diets. It has a high calcium content, but also contains oxalic acid. This acid combines with calcium to form a compound that the body cannot absorb. For this reason, the calcium in spinach is considered unavailable as a nutrient. This is of small importance, however, in the ordinary diet. The oxalic acid factor would become important only if a person relied largely on spinach for calcium. The only effect the acid would have is if a large quantity of spinach juice were taken. This might cause disturbing results in the joints.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 89

Protein: 10.4g

Fat: 1.4g

Carbohydrates: 14.5g

Calcium: 368mg

Phosphorus: 167mg

Iron: 13.6mg

Vitamin A: 26,450 I.U.

Thiamine: .5mg

Riboflavin: .93mg

Niacin: 2.7mg

Ascorbic Acid: 167mg

Rethinking Cancer Newsletter #68

December 6, 2018

Filed under: Rethinking Cancer Newsletters — admin @ 9:15 am

Rethinking Cancer Newsletter #68

FALL SPECIAL! In appreciation of all our supporters: starting today through October 31st, all F.A.C.T. publications on our Donate page — including our latest book, Healing Cancer, the DVD Rethinking Cancer, the book Rethinking Cancer, Detoxification and Triumph Over Cancer — will be discounted 20%. Just apply the code FACT20 at check-out and remember that all purchases are U.S. tax-deductible donations. Go for it!

And just for fun —  a video special: She’s 91, he’s 94. To move is to be alive! Watch this!

To your health!
Foundation for Advancement in Cancer Therapy (F.A.C.T.)

P.S. Our film, Rethinking Cancer, is now streaming internationally on Gaia.com, iTunes and Amazon. We are very grateful for your continued support and hope you’ll stay in touch on Twitter, FacebookYouTube channel and now on Vimeo!

The Wisdom of the Body
By Ruth Sackman

Ruth Sackman (1915-2008), co-founder and president of F.A.C.T. for 38 years, had a down-to-earth way of explaining things. Her writings are the heart of our newest  publication, Healing Cancer — The Unconventional Wisdom of Ruth Sackman. Here’s a sample:

Physicians pour Drugs of which they know little, to cure Diseases
of which they know less, into Humans of which they know nothing.”
— Voltaire (1694 – 1778)

By far, the most important requirement to enable someone to restore and maintain one’s health is to understand physiology (body function). Lack of this understanding makes the individual vulnerable to all sorts of serious mistakes. When one understands how the body functions, one is capable of knowing what to do, when and how to do it. READ MORE

Baking Soda: Good for Practically Everything!

Most of us think of baking soda as something for baking or to keep in the back of refrigerators to absorb odors. But that would be a gross underestimation of the incredible powers of this amazing, low-cost natural remedy —  powers that include benefits for basic daily hygiene (e.g., dental care) digestive issues, kidney problems, urinary tract infections, itchy skin relief, arthritis, not to mention cleaning fruits and vegetables, removing greasy stains and mildew, brightening colors in the washing machine, unclogging drains, and on and on and on. READ MORE

What’s the Big Deal With Manuka Honey?

Honey has been coveted for food and medicine down through the ages. There are over 300 types on the planet and manuka is the best of the best — currently enjoying a boom in worldwide popularity. There is, however, a downside. The explosion in demand has led some manufacturers to engage in shady dealing. According to the UK Independent, approximately 83% of manuka honey on the 2014 global market was fake and that number is likely larger today. READ MORE

Sweet Sour Sauce*

1 cup ketchup, preferably homemade or organic
¼ cup raw apple cider vinegar
¼ cup organic maple syrup (certified chemical-free)

  1. Mix all ingredients well in a small glass bowl.
  2. Serve immediately.
  3. Refrigerate leftover sauce in a glass jar.

Great sauce or marinade for fish, meat or veggies.

*Thanks to Sarah, The Healthy Home Economist.

Chicory

December 3, 2018

Chicory is closely related to endive. There are many varieties to chicory. They include green chicory, which is leafy; and radicchio, also a root chicory, which is red and white. Chicory is best when tossed in salad with other vegetables.

Green chicory is cultivated primarily in Europe, although varieties grow wild in Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Unite States. Belgium endive is primarily cultivated in Belgium and is prized for its delicate flavor. Radicchio is native to Italy and primarily grows there.

Radicchio is often sold with the root attached. If possible the root should be eaten because it is very good.

When selecting chicory, look for a fresh, crisp, green vegetable. Belgium endive, which looks like a tightly wrapped stalk, should be white or near white. Radicchio should be crisp and fresh.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Chicory is an alkaline food that is good in elimination diets. It is high in vitamin C. Tea made from chicory roots and used as an enema is a wonderful remedy for increasing peristaltic action and getting the liver to work.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (greens only)

Calories: 74

Protein: 6.7 g

Fat: 1.1 g

Carbohydrates: 14.1 g

Calcium: 320 mg

Phosphorus: 149 mg

Iron: 3.3 mg

Vitamin A: 14,880 I.U.

Thiamine: .22 mg

Riboflavin: .37 mg

Niacin: 1.9 mg

Ascorbic acid: —

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