Non-Traditional Approaches to
the Theories, Treatments and Prevention of Cancer

Carrot

March 30, 2015

The carrot has been native to Europe since ancient times, and was introduced to the United States during the period of early colonization. Carrots soon became a staple garden crop. Today, they are one of the major truck and garden vegetables.

Depending on the variety, carrots grow to maturity and are ready for market within 70 to 120 days. They are always in season, and are produced in nearly all states. The largest carrot producers are Texas, Florida, and New York. Carrots are so easy to raise that a garden in your backyard in can yield carrots that are rich in vitamins and high in mineral content.

When purchasing carrots, look for firm, smooth, well-shaped carrots of good color and fresh appearance. The tops should be fresh and green, unless they have been damaged in transit from grower to market. Carrots with excessively thick masses of leaf stems at the point of attachment arc usually undesirable because they have large cores and may be woody. Look for carrots with “eye appeal.”

Carrots may be utilized in the diet in many ways. The best way is to eat them raw and as fresh as possible. Raw cam sticks and curls are attractive garnishes and appetizers. Grated carrot, steamed in a stainless steel kettle or baked in the oven and served with parsley and butter, is a nice dish. The bright color of carrots makes them appealing and appetizing to serve with dinner, in salads, with other vegetables, or with cottage cheese or apples and nuts.

Carrot tops are full of potassium, but because of this they are so bitter that the average person does not enjoy them. However, a small portion of the tops may be cut fine and put into mixed salads, or a bunch may be tied with string and cooked in broths or soups for flavoring and for their high mineral content. Lift them out before saving.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Because the carrot is so high in vitamin A, it has been used extensively in the diet to improve the eyesight. Carrots were used in World War II in aerial training schools to improve the eyesight of the students.

Many children have lower jaws that are underdeveloped. This deformity is usually the result of calcium deficiency in the child’s early growth. Babies do not always get enough calcium and some do not have enough raw food or other chewing foods that help promote normal growth of bones and teeth. It is good for a child to have a raw carrot with each meal. I have seen the teeth of children straighten out and the lower jaw develop in a year, when they were given a carrot to chew on before each meal.

Carrots contain a great deal of roughage. They will help in an cases of constipation.

Used as a general bodybuilder, carrot juice is excellent. This juice is presently used in cases of severe illness, and as a foundation in cancer diets. It is delicious and nutritious when combined with other juices such as parsley, celery, watercress, endive, or romaine lettuce.

Everyone can benefit from drinking fresh vegetable juice, and carrot juice one of the best. Some juice vendors believe that die short, stubby carrot is the most flavorful and colorful, and contains more vitamins and minerals. However, the long, deader carrot can be high in these values, too, and is also used.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 179

Protein: 4.8 g

Fat: 1.2 g

Carbohydrates: 37.2 g

Calcium: 156 mg

Phosphorus: 148 mg

Iron: 3.2 mg

Vitamin A: 48,000 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.27 mg

Riboflavin: 0.26 mg

Niacin: 2 mg

Ascorbic acid: 24 mg

Cabbage

March 16, 2015

Cabbage was widely grown in ancient China. In fact, the workers on the Great Wall so many years ago were fed on cabbage and rice. When winter came, wine was added to the cabbage to preserve it, producing a sour cabbage pleasant to the taste, which didn’t spoil. A thousand years later the Tartars under Genghis Khan conquered China and carried sour cabbage with them as they overran other parts of the world. The vitamin C in cabbage was enough to prevent scurvy, the deficiency disease which killed many soldiers on long marches in ancient times.

When the Tartars came to Eastern Europe they were still eating sour cabbage, but they were preserving it with salt rather than wine. The Russians, Poles and Austrians tasted this food of their conquerors and liked it. The Austrians named it sauerkraut. The Dutch brought cole slaw to America, its name deriving from kool for cabbage and slaw for salad: cabbage salad.

Raw cabbage has been known from antiquity as a remedy for drunkenness. Eating cabbage with vinegar before a drinking bout and after a feast would prevent one from feeling too strongly the effects of the wine or beer.

Pliny, the Roman naturalist, thought the best cabbages were those tiny heads that grow on the stalk after the original big head is picked. Gardeners who leave the cabbage stalk in the ground usually find these a few weeks later.

On St. Patrick’s Day a dish of corned beef and cabbage, while delicious, is more American than Irish. The dish is a variation of a traditional Irish meal but because early Irish-Americans were poor, beef was a cheaper alternative to traditional pork, and cabbage happened to be a springtime vegetable.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Down through the centuries cabbage has been used for just about every purpose industrious herb doctors could experiment with: chronic coughs, colic, constipation, dysentery, toothache, gout, pains in the liver, deafness, insomnia and many other ailments. Contrarily, some writers on herb medicines declared that cabbage should be avoided because of its tendency to cause flatulence.

Today we know that long cooking produces the sulfur compounds which, in the past, gave cabbage its bad name. Heat, soaking in water or cooking for too long a time break down the sulfur compounds and create the digestive problems some people have with cabbage. Serve cabbage raw if you would get the most out of it, nutritionally speaking. If you must cook it, make it brief—no more than a few minutes in a tiny bit of water. Shred or chop it finely before cooking, so that this short cooking time will be enough.

Cabbage is one of our best sources of vitamin C—raw, it may contain up to 50 milligrams per serving. It also contains considerable potassium and vitamin A. One half cup contains only 10 calories, so it is an excellent “filler” food for the calorie-counter. A dressing of lemon juice or vinegar adds almost no calories. Mayonnaise or other oily salad dressing is suitable if you are counting carbohydrate units rather than calories. When you shred cabbage for slaw for cooking, prepare it as soon as possible before eating. It loses vitamin C with every additional moment it stands before eating. Keep the cabbage head in the refrigerator and, if you don’t use it all at one meal, cover the cut side with waxed paper or foil to keep out all air.

NUTRITIONAL VALUE

Calories: 22

Protein: 1.1 g

Fat: 0.1 g

Carbohydrates: 5.2 g

Calcium: 35.6 mg

Phosphorus: 23.1 mg

Iron: .4 mg

Vitamin A: 87.2 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.1 mg

Riboflavin: 0.1 mg

Niacin: 0.2 mg

Radish

March 2, 2015

The radish is a member of the mustard family, but is also related to cabbage, cauliflower, kale, and turnips. After this vegetable was introduced into Middle Asia from China in prehistoric times, many forms of the plant were developed. Radishes are a cool season crop, and the peak period is April through July. The American varieties can be used for both roots and tops in salads, and cooked.

A good-quality radish is well-formed, smooth, firm, tender, and crisp, with a mild flavor. The condition of the leaves does not always indicate quality, for they may be fresh, bright, and green, while the radishes may be spongy and strong, or the leaves may be wilted and damaged in handling, while the radishes themselves may be fresh and not at all pithy. Old, slow-growing radishes are usually strong in flavor, with a woody flesh. Slight finger pressure will disclose sponginess or pithiness.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Radishes are strongly diuretic and stimulate the appetite and digestion. The juice of raw radishes is helpful in catarrhal conditions. The mustard oil content of the radish makes it good for expelling gallstones from the bladder.

A good cocktail can be made with radishes. This cocktail will eliminate catarrhal congestion in the body, especially in the sinuses. It will also aid in cleansing the gall bladder and liver. To make this cocktail, combine one-third cucumber juice, one-third radish juice, and one-third green pepper juice. If desired, apple juice may be added to make this more palatable. An excellent cocktail for nervous disorders is made from radish juice, prune juice, and rice polishings. This drink is high in vitamin B and aids in the flow of bile.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 49

Protein: 2.9g

Fat: .3g

Carbohydrates: 10.3g

Calcium: 86mg

Phosphorus: 89mg

Iron: 2.9mg

Vitamin A: 30 I.U.

Thiamine: .09mg

Riboflavin: .09mg

Niacin: .9mg

Ascorbic Acid: 74mg

Asparagus

February 2, 2015

The ancient Phoenicians brought asparagus to the Greeks and Romans. It was described in the sixteenth century by the English writer Evelyn as “sperage” and he said that it was “delicious eaten raw with oil and vinegar.”

When selecting asparagus, choose spears that are fresh, firm, and tender (not woody or pithy), with tips that are tightly closed. Watch for signs of decay, such as rot and mold. If the tip of the spear appears wilted, the asparagus is really too old to be good. From the tip to all but an inch of the base, the stalk should be tender. Angular stalks indicate that they are tough and stringy.

Store asparagus wrapped in a damp cloth or waxed paper, and keep refrigerated until you are ready to use it. Asparagus loses its edible quality when it is subjected to dryness and heat, which reduce the sugar content and increase the fiber content.

Asparagus is a perennial herb, and is a member of the Lily of the Valley family. It can be served hot, with drawn butter; cold, in a salad; in soups; and as a sandwich filling or flavoring.

The season for asparagus is February through July, and the peak months are April, May, and June. Early spring asparagus is from California; late spring asparagus is shipped in early April or late May from Maryland, Delaware, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, Michigan, Illinois, and Iowa. Green asparagus is the most nutritious. Some varieties are green-tipped with white butts, and some are entirely white. Most of the white variety is canned.

Asparagus is best when cooked in stainless steel, on low heat. This leaves the shoots tender and retains their original color. If cooked with the tips up, more vitamin B1 and C will be preserved. The liquid can be saved and used in vegetable cocktails.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Asparagus acts as a general stimulant to the kidneys, but can be irritating to the kidneys if taken in excess or if there is extreme kidney inflammation. Because it contains chlorophyll, it is a good blood builder.

Green asparagus tips are high in vitamin A, while the white tips have almost none. This food leaves an alkaline ash in the body. Because they have a lot of roughage, only the tips can be used in a soft diet. They are high in water content and are considered a good vegetable in an elimination diet. Many of the elements that build the liver, kidneys, skin, ligaments, and bones are found in green asparagus. Green asparagus also helps in the formation of red blood corpuscles.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 90

Protein: 7.5g

Fat: .7g

Carbohydrates: 13.1g

Calcium: 71mg

Phosphorus: 211mg

Iron: 3.11mg

Vitamin A: 3,430 I.U.

Thiamine: .54mg

Riboflavin: .59mg

Niacin: 3.9mg

Ascorbic Acid: 113mg

Artichoke

January 26, 2015

The artichoke is believed to be native to the area around the western and central Mediterranean. The Romans were growing artichokes over 2000 years ago, and used it as a green and a salad plant.

Artichokes were brought to England in 1548, and French settlers planted them in Louisiana in the mid-nineteenth century. California is now the center of the artichoke crop, and its peak season is March, April, and May although the crop is also available in November and December.

The name “artichoke” is derived from the northern Italian words “articiocco” and “articoclos”, which refer to what we know to be a pine cone. The artichoke bud does resemble a pine cone.

There is a variety of vegetable called the Jerusalem artichoke, but it is not a true artichoke. It is a tuberous member of the sunflower family. Here, we refer to the two types of true artichokes, the Cardoon (cone-shaped) and the Globe. The most popular variety is the Green Globe.

The artichoke is a large, vigorous plant. It has long, coarse, spiny leaves that can grow to three feet long. The artichoke plants may grow as high as six feet tall.

A perennial, the artichoke grows best in cool, but not freezing, weather. It likes plenty of water, and rain and fog, so is best suited to the California coast, especially the San Francisco area.

For a good quality artichoke, select one that is compact, plump, and heavy, yields slightly to pressure, and has large, tightly clinging, fleshy leaf scales that are a good color. An artichoke that is brown is old or has been injured. An artichoke is overmature when it is open or spreading, the center is fuzzy or dark pink or purple, and the tips and scales are hard. March, April, and May are the months when the artichoke is most abundant.

The parts of the artichoke that are eaten are the fleshy part of the leaves and heart, and the tender base. Medium-sized artichokes are best—large ones tend to be tough and tasteless. They may be served either hot or cold, and make a delicious salad.

To prepare artichokes, cut off the stem and any tough or damaged leaves. Was the artichoke in cold running water, then place in boiling water, and cook twenty to thirty minutes, or until tender. To make the artichoke easier to eat, remove the choke in the center, pull out the top center leaves, and, with a spoon, remove the thistle-like inside.

To eat artichokes, pull off the petal leaves as you would the petals of a daisy, and bite off the end.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Artichoke hearts and leaves have a high alkaline ash. They also have a great deal of roughage, which is not good for those who have inflammation of the bowel. They are good to eat on a reducing diet.

Artichokes contain vitamins A and C, which are good for fighting off infection. They are high in calcium and iron.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (including inedible parts)

Calories: 60

Protein: 5.3 g

Fat: 0.4 g

Carbohydrates: 19.2 g

Calcium: 93 mg

Phosphorus: 160 mg

Iron: 2.4 mg

Vitamin A: 290 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.14 mg

Riboflavin: 0.09 mg

Niacin: 1.7 mg

Ascorbic acid: 22 mg

Mushroom

January 19, 2015

The Pharaohs of Egypt monopolized mushrooms for their own use. They thought they were too delicate to be eaten by common people. The Egyptian potentates did not understand the sudden, overnight appearance of mushrooms, and consequently believed they grew magically. By the first century B.C., the mushroom had gained such a fine reputation among epicures of the Roman Empire that the poet Horace celebrated its goodness in verse. The Romans called mushrooms “food of the gods”, and served them on festive occasions. They were thought to provide warriors with unusual strength.

Up to the seventeenth century, only the wild types of mushrooms found growing in meadows and pastures were known. During the reign of Louis XIV, mushroom · growing was introduced in France. Parisian market gardeners experimented to learn the secrets of successful mushroom culture. By 1749 mushroom beds were cultivated in caves and cellars, and the results were much better’ than ·when they were grown outdoors. The British were raising mushrooms in hothouses sometime before 1700.

The commercial production of mushrooms in the United States started in the late 1890s when a group of florists in Chester County, Pennsylvania started growing them under the benches in their greenhouses. The greatest event in the history of mushroom culture in the United States occurred in 1926 when a farmer found a clump of pure white mushrooms in a bed of uniformly cream-colored fungi. Most of the mushrooms grown today are descendants of this white clump.

Mushrooms are now cultivated in specially constructed buildings that are windowless and in which temperature and humidity are controlled. Mushroom spawn is cultivated by laboratory scientists who sell it to the growers for inoculation of the mushroom beds. Such precise methods are necessary to provide pure spawn of known characteristics.

The introduction of mushrooms into gravies, sauces, soups, and other dishes adds zest and flavor, but they also are a fine food when served as a vegetable . Mushrooms require very little preparation. Wash, cut off the bottom portion of the stem if it has dried, and either slice the caps and stems or leave whole, depending on the method of cooking. Butter a deep pan, cut up the mushrooms so they fill the pan to a depth of about two inches, and simmer over a low· heat until the mushrooms are covered with their own juice. This may take more than ten minutes. Then, cook more briskly for about five minutes, until tender. Overcooking toughens mushrooms.

Green plants can get their food by manufacturing it in their leaves from air, water, sunshine , and soil nutrients, but mushrooms cannot do this. They have no leaves, so they must depend on green plants to make their food for them, and they cannot use it unless it is in the process of decay. Mushrooms propagate from spores, a brownish powder shed from the rounded head which, when ripe, opens like a parasol. However, cultivated mushrooms are not reproduced from spores, but from fine strands of mycelium, which are root like growths that spread through organic material. Most wild mushrooms are not poisonous, but unless you know the difference, you should leave them alone. It is not possible to tell by taste which mushrooms are dangerous. Some very unpalatable mushrooms are harmless, while others that have an agreeable taste are poisonous.

Scientists today say that darkness is not the primary requisite for growing mushrooms. They say that, for healthy growth, all mushrooms need constant temperature and protection against drafts.

The term mushroom refers to a large number of different species and varieties of fleshy fungi. Only one species is usually cultivated and that is Agaricus Campestris, which has a straight stem, a smooth cap of a shade varying from white or ivory to brown, and gills of different shades of pink. Most of the cultivated mushrooms grown in the United States are of the white variety variously known as Snow White, White King, White Queen, etc. This variety is very prolific and is preferred by nearly all markets because of its attractive, clean, white appearance.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Prior to the mid-1940s, all you needed to do to work up a hot argument among nutritionists was to say the word “mushrooms.” Scientists’ assertions about the food value of mushrooms ranged from calling them’ ‘vegetable beefsteak” full of proteins, to declaring that they had no protein and very little else. This confusion arose partly from the fact that mushrooms of many species were investigated and the results reported under a common head. A June 1946 report by William B. Eccelen, Jr. and Carl R. Fellers of the Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment Station stated that cultivated mushrooms of the Agaricus Campestris type compare favorably in food value to many fresh fruits and vegetables.

Mushrooms are among the few rich organic sources of germanium, which increases oxygen efficiency of the body, counteracts the effects of pollutants, and increases resistance to disease. Because mushrooms are extremely low in calories, they are useful in reducing diets. They are also a good source of vitamin B.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 123

Protein: 11.9 g

Fat: 1.2 g

Carbohydrates: 19.4 g

Calcium: 26 mg

Phosphorus: 510 mg

Iron: 3.5 mg

Vitamin A: trace

Thiamine: 0.41 mg

Riboflavin: 2.02 mg

Niacin: 18.6 mg

Ascorbic acid: 14 mg

Brussels Sprouts

January 12, 2015

Brussels sprouts are said to be native to Brussels, Belgium. They were cultivated in England early in the nineteenth century. Brussels sprouts were not extensively cultivated in this country until the early twentieth century, and were first grown in the delta region of Louisiana.

Brussels sprouts are a member of the cabbage family. The plant produces a number of very small heads along the stem. They are grown for the fresh market, frozen, and canned. Fresh sprouts may be steamed or boiled, using very little water. California and New York produce the greatest number of Brussels sprouts.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Raw Brussels sprouts contain excellent levels of vitamin C and vitamin K, with more moderate amounts of B vitamins, such as folic acid and vitamin B6, essential minerals and dietary fiber exist in lesser amounts.

Brussels sprouts, as with broccoli and other brassicas, contain sulforaphane, a phytochemical under basic research for its potential anticancer properties. Although boiling reduces the level of sulforaphane, steaming and stir frying do not result in significant loss.

Brussels sprouts and other brassicas are also a source of indole-3-carbinol, a chemical being studied for how it affects DNA repair in cells and appears to block the growth of cancer cells in vitro.

Consuming Brussels sprouts in excess may not be suitable for heart patients taking anticoagulants since they contain vitamin K, a blood-clotting factor. In one such reported incident, doctors determined that the reason for a heart patient’s worsening condition was eating too many Brussels sprouts which countered the intended effects of blood-thinning therapy

Brussels sprouts often produce gas, but some people can eat them without this effect if they are steamed or boiled over low heat. The sulfur in Brussels sprouts is needed for circulation, and they are good in the winter to help keep us warm.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 213

Protein: 20.0 g

Fat: 2.3 g

Carbohydrates: 40.8 g

Calcium: 154 mg

Phosphorus: 354 mg

Iron: 5.9 mg

Vitamin A: 1,816 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.36 mg

Riboflavin: 0.73 mg

Niacin: 3.2 mg

Ascorbic acid: 431 mg

Kale

January 5, 2015

Kale, and collard, its close relative, are the oldest known members of the cabbage family. Wild cabbage, which strongly resembles kale in its appearance, is still found growing along the European coasts and in North Africa. Kale is native either to the eastern Mediterranean region or to Asia Minor. It is known that man has been eating this vegetable for more than 4000 years.

The word “kale” was first used in Scotland, and is derived from the Greek and Latin words “coles” and “caulis”. These words refer to the whole group of cabbage-like plants. In America, kale was first mentioned in 1669, although it was probably introduced to this continent at an earlier date.

The sulfur compounds that are found in the cabbage family are, of course, also found in kale. These compounds break up easily, and decomposition occurs when kale is cooked too long or at too low a temperature. Overcooking also destroys the flavor.

Kale is on the market all year, but is most abundant through the late fall and winter. The peak months are December through February. Kale comes principally from Virginia, New York, New Jersey, and the Middle Atlantic states.

There are now many varieties of kale, but the crinkly-leaved and the smooth-leaved are the two most popular commercial types. The smooth type is usually referred to as spring kale, and the curly as green Scotch kale, or Siberian blue kale. Scotch kale are usually crinkled and curled, have a finely divided leaf, and are bright green to yellowish-green in color. The leaves of the Siberian kale are flattened and smooth in the center, with curled and ruffled edges, and are of a deep, bluish-green color. Wilted and yellowed leaves should be avoided.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Kale is very high in calcium, vitamin A, and iron. It is good for building up the calcium content of the body, and builds strong teeth. Kale is beneficial to the digestive and nervous systems.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 117

Protein: 11.3 g

Fat: 1.7 g

Carbohydrates: 21.0 g

Calcium: 655 mg

Phosphorus: 180 mg

Iron: 6.4 mg

Vitamin A: 21,950 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.3 mg

Riboflavin: 0.76 mg

Niacin: 5.8 mg

Ascorbic acid: 335 mg

Radish

December 29, 2014

The radish is a member of the mustard family, but is also related to cabbage, cauliflower, kale, and turnips. After this vegetable was introduced into Middle Asia from China in prehistoric times, many forms of the plant were developed. Radishes are a cool season crop, and the peak period is April through July. The American varieties can be used for both roots and tops in salads, and cooked.

A good-quality radish is well-formed, smooth, firm, tender, and crisp, with a mild flavor. The condition of the leaves does not always indicate quality, for they may be fresh, bright, and green, while the radishes may be spongy and strong, or the leaves may be wilted and damaged in handling, while the radishes themselves may be fresh and not at all pithy. Old, slow-growing radishes are usually strong in flavor, with a woody flesh. Slight finger pressure will disclose sponginess or pithiness.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Radishes are strongly diuretic and stimulate the appetite and digestion. The juice of raw radishes is helpful in catarrhal conditions. The mustard oil content of the radish makes it good for expelling gallstones from the bladder.

A good cocktail can be made with radishes. This cocktail will eliminate catarrhal congestion in the body, especially in the sinuses. It will also aid in cleansing the gall bladder and liver. To make this cocktail, combine one-third cucumber juice, one-third radish juice, and one-third green pepper juice. If desired, apple juice may be added to make this more palatable. An excellent cocktail for nervous disorders is made from radish juice, prune juice, and rice polishings. This drink is high in vitamin B and aids in the flow of bile.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 49

Protein: 2.9g

Fat: .3g

Carbohydrates: 10.3g

Calcium: 86mg

Phosphorus: 89mg

Iron: 2.9mg

Vitamin A: 30 I.U.

Thiamine: .09mg

Riboflavin: .09mg

Niacin: .9mg

Ascorbic Acid: 74mg

Potato and Sweet Potato

November 24, 2014

The potato is one vegetable that is abundant throughout the year. It comes in many varieties. Though called “Irish”, the white potato is native to the mountains of tropical America from Chile to Mexico, and was widely cultivated in South America at the time of the Spanish Conquest. The Spaniards introduced the potato into Europe early in the sixteenth century, and it was Sir Walter Raleigh who showed England how to eat the potato with beef gravy. He, too, started the potato fad in colonial Virginia, but it was Sir Francis Drake who was supposed to have brought the potato to Ireland. The potato soon became second only to Indian corn as the most important food contribution of the Americas, and is now one of the most valuable vegetable crops in the world.

The potato is classed as a protective vegetable because of its high vitamin C content. It has been noted in the past that, as the potato became common, scurvy, which is prevalent where vitamin C is absent, became uncommon, and soon disappeared almost entirely in potato-eating countries.

If we had to confine ourselves to one food, the potato is the one on which we could live almost indefinitely, exclusive of other foods, as it is a complete food in itself. It was Professor Hinhede of Denmark, a food scientist during the last war, who proved to the world that a person could live on potatoes for a long period of time without any depreciation of body energy. In fact he and his assistant lived three years solely on potatoes-raw and cooked. He not only proved the potato to be a complete food, but he also showed how inexpensive a diet it was at a cost of approximately only six cents a day. It is good, however, to eat potatoes with other vegetables; eating them by themselves may eventually cause constipation.

When selecting potatoes make sure they are smooth, shallow-eyed, and reasonably unblemished. Avoid the extra large .potato as it may have a hollow or pithy center. Potatoes with a slight green color are sunburned and may have developed a bitter taste.

The energy value of the potato is approximately the same as bread, but it is a far better balanced food than bread, particularly in its content of potassium, iron, and vitamins C, B1 , and G. The potato is also lower in calories. Because potatoes are a starchy food, they put less work on the kidneys.

It is best to eat potatoes in as raw a form as possible. However, raw, cut potatoes should be eaten as soon as they are cut, as their oxidation is very rapid. I know of no other food that will turn green, ferment, and break down quicker than potatoes will when they have been juiced.

Potatoes may be sliced raw and used in salads. Juice them, mixed with parsley, beets, or other vegetables for flavor. Potato juice is . a great rejuvenator and is a quick way to get an abundance of vitamin C as well as other vitamins and minerals. Why not munch on a raw potato? It is no more peculiar for a child to eat a piece of raw potato than it is for him to eat a raw apple.

Instead of throwing away the potato peeling, eat it, because it is rich in mineral elements. At least 60 percent of the potassium contained in the potato lies so close to the skin that it cannot be saved if the potato is peeled. Furthermore, potassium is a salt, and you do not need to salt potatoes if the potato peelings are used. If you feel you need more seasoning, use a mineral broth powder (dehydrated vegetables) instead of table salt. Even using sweet butter in place of salted butter is better, and is not difficult to get used to when the flavor is enhanced with the addition of broth powder.

There are numerous ways to prepare and serve potatoes. They have a bland flavor, so they can be used frequently in meals. It is best to cook potatoes on a low heat, if possible, and if they are not baked they should be cooked in a vapor-sealed vessel to retain their goodness. The art of cooking can be used to build or to destroy.

It is necessary that we realize the difference between a properly steamed potato and a boiled potato-one is alkaline and the other is acid. According to the Bureau of Home Economics, United States Department of Agriculture, when ordinary cooking methods are used, from 32 to 76 percent of the essential food values, minerals, and vitamins are lost due to oxidation, or are destroyed by heat or dissolved in water. In a vapor-sealed utensil, oxidation is practically eliminated, less heat is required, and waterless cooking is possible . The vitamins and minerals are preserved for you and are not carried away by escaping steam.

The outside of the potato is the positive side. The negative side is the inside. The inside is carbohydrate and is acid in body reaction. So, it is best, when making alkalinizing broths for example, that you discard the center of the potato before adding the potato to the broth ingredients. Throw this part of the potato into your garden if you have one and it will do its part to rebuild the soil.

In preparing potatoes for cooking, scrub and wash them thoroughly. Use a stiff brush to remove the dirt. To bake, drop them first in very hot water to heat them, then rub them with oil to keep their skins from getting too hard in the process of baking and to help them be more easily digested. Remember to bake them at a slow oven heat. In the last five minutes of baking raise the oven heat to about 400°F to break down the starch grains.

Before serving baked potatoes, they may be cut in half, scooped out, and mashed with nut butter, avocado, or a little grated cheese. Garnish with parsley or chives. Or, take plain, baked potatoes, split open, and serve with a Roquefort, cream, and chive dressing.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Potatoes leave an alkaline ash in the body, are low in roughage, and may be used in the treatment of acidosis. They can also be used for catarrhal conditions.

When trying to overcome catarrhal conditions, cut the potato peeling about a half-inch thick and use it in broth or soup, cooking very little. The resulting broth will contain many important mineral elements.

Potato soup can also be used to great advantage in cases of uric acid, kidney, and stomach disorders, and for replacing minerals in the system. To make potato soup, peel six potatoes, making sure the peelings are about three-quarters of an inch thick. Place in water in a covered kettle and simmer twenty minutes. Add celery to change the flavor if desired. Add okra powder if the stomach is irritated.

The potassium in the potato is strongly alkaline, which makes for good liver activation, elastic tissues, and supple muscles. It also produces body grace and a good disposition. Potassium is the ”healer” of the body and is very necessary in rejuvenation. It is good heart element also, and potatoes can be used very well in all cases of heart troubles.

Anyone with ailments on the left side of the body-the negative side, or the heart and intestinal side of the body-can use carbohydrates that are negative in character. Potatoes are one of the best negative foods to use for building up the left side of the body.

To use an old remedy, take slices of potatoes and use as a pack over any congested part of the body. This type of pack draws out static, toxic material, or venous congestion in any part of the body. Use a narrow, thumb-shaped piece of potato to help correct hemorrhoid conditions.

To control diarrhea, cook potato soup with milk. The milk controls the diarrhea-it has a constipating effect, if boiled. The potato adds bulk, which is also necessary to control this trouble.

The raw potato juice is one of the most volatile juices and the strongest juice that can be taken into the body. It is used in many cases of intestinal disorders, as well as for rejuvenation.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (raw and pared)

Calories 279

Protein 7.6g

Fat 0.4g

Carbohydrates 6.8g

Calcium 26mg

Phosphorus 195mg

Iron 2.7g

Vitamin A trace

Thiamine 0.40mg

Riboflavin 0.15mg

Niacin 4.4 mg

Ascorbic acid 64mg

Sweet Potato

The sweet potato should be thought of as a true root and not a tuber, as is commonly believed. It has been one of the most popular foods of tropical and subtropical countries for centuries. Columbus and his men were fed boiled roots by the natives of the West Indies, which these men described as ”not unlike chestnuts in flavor.” This new food was carried back to Spain, and from there it was introduced to European countries. De Soto found sweet potatoes grow­ing in the gardens of the Indians who lived in the territory that is now called Louisiana.

During the Civil War, troops short of rations found they could live indefinitely on sweet potatoes alone. The Japanese on Okinawa could not have held out as long as they did if they had not been able to raid sweet potato patches at night. In 1913 the supply of sweet potatoes was so large and the demand so small that Louisi­ana towns sold them for fifty cents a barrel.

There are two main types of sweet potatoes; those that are mealy when cooked, and those that are wet when cooked-popu­larly miscalled ”yams.” Actually, there are few yams grown in this country, and they are grown almost solely in Florida.

Decay in sweet potatoes spreads rapidly and may give the en­ tire potato a disagreeable flavor. This decay may appear in the form of dark, circular spots or as soft, wet rot, or dry, shriveled, discol­ored and sunken areas, usually at the ends of the root.

Use the sweet potato baked, steamed, or roasted, in puddings or pies. Whenever possible, they should be cooked in their jackets, to conserve the nutrients. If you wish to discard the skin, this vegetable is much easier to peel when cooked. When combining the sweet potato with other foods, remember that it is a little more difficult to digest than the white potato.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

The sweet potato is good for the eliminative system, but is a little more difficult to digest than the white potato. It contains a great deal of vitamin A and is a good source of niacin.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 419

Protein: 6.2 g

Fat: 1.5 g

Carbohydrates: 96.6 g

Calcium: 117 mg

Phosphorus: 173 mg

Iron: 2.7 mg

Vitamin A: 30,0301 U.

Thiamine: 0.37 mg

Riboflavin: 0.23 mg

Niacin: 2.8 mg

Ascorbic acid: 77 mg

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