Foundation for Advancement in Cancer Therapy

Non-Traditional Approaches to
the Theories, Treatments and Prevention of Cancer

Orange

January 17, 2017

The orange is one of the oldest fruits known in the history of cultivation. As early as 500 B.C. the fruit of the citrus tree was mentioned in a collection of old documents believed to be edited by Confucius himself. In the year A.D. 1178, Han Yen-Chi, a Chinese horticulturist, wrote on the subject of oranges, and the seedless orange was mentioned in these writings. This author speaks of twenty-seven varieties of “very valuable and precious” oranges.

Oranges were originally brought from China to India, and gradually spread over the entire world where the climate was mild enough for their cultivation. The sour orange, or “Naranga,” as it was referred to in Sanskrit about A.D. 100. came into cultivation in the basin of the Mediterranean long before the fall of the Roman Empire. The sweet variety, or “Airavata,” does not appear to have been cultivated until early in the fifteenth century, and then became so popular that it was soon being cultivated extensively throughout Southern Europe. The Moors brought the Seville orange from the East.

Wild oranges were found in the West Indies and Brazil as early as1600. The early Spanish explorers are believed to have brought oranges with them to this country in the time of Ponce de Leon’s quest for the Fountain of Youth. In California, the orange was cultivated at the San Diego Mission in 1769 and, in the year 1804, 400 seedlings grew into a grove of considerable size around the San Gabriel Mission. The popularity of the orange, particularly in the favorable climate of California, grew rapidly, until it soon developed into a leading industry. The orange became known as “California’s liquid sunshine.”

The original orange was very small, bitter, and full of seeds, but through constant efforts in cross-fertilization and selection, many varieties of this delicious fruit are now cultivated with a tremendous improvement in the quality of the fruit. The sweet oranges are, by far, the most popular, while the sour orange is used more for its propagating stock than for its fruit. Unless killed by frost or fire, the orange tree lives to an old age and continues to bear fruit throughout its lifetime.

More than two hundred varieties of oranges are grown in the United States. In 1919 the United States produced only about 25 percent of the world’s total output of oranges, but now it produces about half. Oranges comprise about 60 percent of the citrus fruit grown in the United States.

Oranges are available every day of the year, but are most abundant in the United States from January to May. California, Florida, and Texas are the orange-producing states, and each of these states ships great quantities. California’s vast Valencia orange acreage is now more extensive than the Navel orange plantings. This state now has about 150.000 acres of Valendas, and about 100,000 acres of Navels, with an additional few thousand acres of miscdanmus orange varieties. The largest proportion of the California orange crop-about 85 to 90 percent, comes from southern California.

Choose the first oranges of the season, for they are the richest in mineral values. Tree-ripened oranges have, by far, the greatest mineral content. The best quality orange is firm and heavy, has a fine-textured skin varying in texture according to variety, and is well-colored. The light orange lacks juice. Avoid the soft, flabby, or shriveled orange and those oranges with any soft or moldy areas upon them. Do not eat unripe oranges because they can cause stomach upsets. particularly in small children. Once the skin is cut or broken, the fruit should be eaten immediately as the vitamin C is banned by exposure to the air. If orange juice is kept for a period of time, store in the refrigerator in an airtight container.

The orange is classified as a subtropical fruit and has a citric add content of 1.5 percent. This alkaline-reacting fruit is best eaten with other tropical or subtropical fruits, with add fruits, or with nuts or milk. It is best to avoid eating this fruit with starches or sweets, or with dried fruits.

Use oranges as a dessert fruit, with yogurt, or in combination salads. Make a cup of a segmented orange the thick-skinned seedless orange is best for segmenting-and nil with cottage cheese. Make liquefied drinks, mixing orange juice with other subtropical or tropical fruits such as cactus fruits, loquats, mango, papaya, persimmon, pineapple, pomegranate, apples, and citrus fruits. Many have advised eating oranges or drinking orange juice with meals, early in the morning on an empty stomach, or directly following a meal if the body is in a highly add condition.

The orange is one of the best sources of water-soluble vitamin C. The absence or insufficiency of this causes scurvy. As vitamin C is the least stable of all the vitamins, storage of orange juice at low temperature destroys the vitamin to some extent, and sterilization may destroy it completely. Generally, I think it is best to use the citric add fruits in sections rather than in juices. When the orange is eaten in sections, the mineral material found in the pulp will help to neutralize the citric add effect as it goes into the body.

Citrus fruits are high in sodium, but only when completely matured in the sunshine. The fruit acids from green or immature fruit cause many adverse body reactions.

If the section and bulk of the orange is fresh and sweet, it is an excellent food for children as a supplement for those who must drink cow’s milk, or any milk, because it seems to help in the retention of calcium in the body. Ripe oranges contain as much as 10 percent fruit sugar, which can be immediately assimilated by the body.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Oranges are the most popular source of Vitamin C. They are excellent for treating over acid body conditions, constipation, or a particularly sluggish intestinal tract. In cases of acidosis, drink orange juice, or eat oranges after meals. If the intestinal tract is not functioning properly, drink a large glass of orange juice upon wakening in the morning, or about one-half hour before breakfast. In the cases of stomach acid deficiency, start the meal with a peeled orange or a glass of orange juice.

Those who suffer from tooth decay or poor gums are probably lacking in vitamin C and should drink large amounts of orange juice for a period of a few weeks. People with gastric and duodenal ulcers are deficient in ascorbic acid, and their diet should be supplemented with a high potency vitamin C such as that found in fresh oranges and orange juice.

Orange are very good for elimination. They stir up the acid accumulations and catarrhal settlements in the body very quickly. However, sometimes this is not a good idea if the channels of elimination, such as skin and kidneys, are not able to take out these acids fast enough.

Eat the whole orange, excluding the very outer skin, to get all the good from the fruit. The luscious orange is rated tops in importance in the contribution to health.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 164

Protein: 2.9g

Fat: 0.7 g

Carbohydrates: 36.6 g

Calcium: 108 mg

Phosphorus: 75 mg

Iron: 1.3 mg

Vitamin A: 9101 I.U.

Thiamine: .25mg

Riboflavin: .08 mg

Niacin: .08 mg

Ascorbic acid: 162 mg

Brussels Sprouts

January 9, 2017

Brussels sprouts are said to be native to Brussels, Belgium. They were cultivated in England early in the nineteenth century. Brussels sprouts were not extensively cultivated in this country until the early twentieth century, and were first grown in the delta region of Louisiana.

Brussels sprouts are a member of the cabbage family. The plant produces a number of very small heads along the stem. They are grown for the fresh market, frozen, and canned. Fresh sprouts may be steamed or boiled, using very little water. California and New York produce the greatest number of Brussels sprouts.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Raw Brussels sprouts contain excellent levels of vitamin C and vitamin K, with more moderate amounts of B vitamins, such as folic acid and vitamin B6, essential minerals and dietary fiber exist in lesser amounts.

Brussels sprouts, as with broccoli and other brassicas, contain sulforaphane, a phytochemical under basic research for its potential anticancer properties. Although boiling reduces the level of sulforaphane, steaming and stir frying do not result in significant loss.

Brussels sprouts and other brassicas are also a source of indole-3-carbinol, a chemical being studied for how it affects DNA repair in cells and appears to block the growth of cancer cells in vitro.

Consuming Brussels sprouts in excess may not be suitable for heart patients taking anticoagulants since they contain vitamin K, a blood-clotting factor. In one such reported incident, doctors determined that the reason for a heart patient’s worsening condition was eating too many Brussels sprouts which countered the intended effects of blood-thinning therapy

Brussels sprouts often produce gas, but some people can eat them without this effect if they are steamed or boiled over low heat. The sulfur in Brussels sprouts is needed for circulation, and they are good in the winter to help keep us warm.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 213

Protein: 20.0 g

Fat: 2.3 g

Carbohydrates: 40.8 g

Calcium: 154 mg

Phosphorus: 354 mg

Iron: 5.9 mg

Vitamin A: 1,816 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.36 mg

Riboflavin: 0.73 mg

Niacin: 3.2 mg

Ascorbic acid: 431 mg

Spinach

January 2, 2017

Spinach is a small, fleshy-leaved annual of the goosefoot family. It is a quick-maturing, cool season crop that is hardy and will live outdoors over winter thoughout most of the area from New Jersey southward along the Atlantic Coast and in most parts of the lower South. Spinach has been both praised and abused. It has been popularized in the comic strips by the herculean feats of Popeye the sailor. On the other hand, Dr. Thurman B. Rice of the Indiana State Board of Health says, “If God had intended for us to eat spinach he would have flavored it with something.” But flavoring is a job for cooks. They way spinach is thrown in a pot with a large quantity of water and boiled for a half hour or more, it’s a wonder even Popeye relished it. Spinach should be cooked in a steamer with very little or no added water other than that clinging to the leaves after washing. If you insist on boiling it, again use only the water clinging to the leaves after washing, and cook in a covered pan for not more than ten minutes.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Spinach is an excellent source of vitamins C and A, and iron, and contains about 40 percent potassium. It leaves an alkaline ash in the body. Spinach is good for the lymphatic, urinary, and digestive systems. Spinach has a laxative effect and is wonderful in weight-loss diets. It has a high calcium content, but also contains oxalic acid. This acid combines with calcium to form a compound that the body cannot absorb. For this reason, the calcium in spinach is considered unavailable as a nutrient. This is of small importance, however, in the ordinary diet. The oxalic acid factor would become important only if a person relied largely on spinach for calcium. The only effect the acid would have is if a large quantity of spinach juice were taken. This might cause disturbing results in the joints.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 89

Protein: 10.4g

Fat: 1.4g

Carbohydrates: 14.5g

Calcium: 368mg

Phosphorus: 167mg

Iron: 13.6mg

Vitamin A: 26,450 I.U.

Thiamine: .5mg

Riboflavin: .93mg

Niacin: 2.7mg

Ascorbic Acid: 167mg

Pear

December 19, 2016

Pears were used as food long before agriculture was developed as an industry. They are native to the region from the Caspian Sea westward into Europe. Nearly 1000 Years before the Christian Era, Homer referred to pears as growing in the garden of Alcinous. A number of varieties were known prior to the Christian Era. Pliny listed more than forty varieties of pears. Many varieties were known in Italy, France, Germany, and England by the time America was discovered.

Both pear seeds and trees were brought to the United States by the early settlers. Like the apple, pear trees thrived and produced well from the very start. As early as 1771 the Prince Nursery on Long Island, New York, greatest of the colonial fruit nurseries, listed forty-two varieties. The introduction of pears to California is attributed to the Franciscan Fathers. Led by Father Junipera Serra, in 1776, they planted seeds carried from the Old World.

In the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries greatly improved pears were developed, particularly in Belgium and France. In 1850, pears were so popular in France that the fruit was celebrated in song and verse, and it was the fashion among the elite to see who could raise the best specimen. When the better varieties were brought into the United States a disease attacked the bark, roots, and other soft tissues of the trees, and practically destroyed the industry in the East. The European pear thrives primarily in California, Oregon, and Washington and in a few narrow strips on the south and east sides of Lake Michigan, Lake Erie, and Lake Ontario, where there are relatively cool summers and mild winters. Under these conditions, the trees are not as susceptible to pear blight, or “fire blight.”

Another kind of pear, distinguished from the European “butter fruit” with its soft, melting flesh, had developed in Asia, and is known as the sand pear. These have hard flesh with numerous “sand” or grit cells. Sand pears reached the United States before 1840, by way of Europe, and proved resistant to fire blight. Hybrids of sand pears and European varieties are now grown extensively in the eastern and southern parts of the United States. They are inferior to the European pear, but still better to eat than the original sand pear. The best European varieties grow in the Pacific States, and from these states come most of the pears used for sale as fresh fruit for processing.

Pears are grown in all sections of the country, but the Western states (California, Oregon, and Washington), produce approximately 87 to 90 percent of all pears sold commercially. Practically all pears that are processed come from the Western states.

More than 3000 varieties are known in the United States, but less than a dozen are commercially important today. The Bartlett outranks all other varieties in quantity of production and in value. It is the principal variety grown in California and Washington and is also the important commercial pear in New York and Michigan. It originated in England and was first distributed by a Mr. Williams, a nurseryman in Middlesex. In all other parts of the world it is known as Williams or Williams’ Bon-Chretien. It was brought to the United States in 1798 or 1799 and planted at Roxbury, Massachusetts under the name of Williams’ Bon Chretien. In 1817 Enoch Bartlett acquired the estate, and not knowing the true name of the pear, distributed it under his own name. The variety is large, and bell-shaped, and has smooth clear yellow skin that is often blushed with red. It has white, finely grained flesh, and is juicy and delicious.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Pears have a fairly high content of vitamin C and iron. They are good in all elimination diets and are a wonderful digestive aid. They help normalize bowel activity.

Pears have an alkaline excess. They are a good energy producer in the winter, when used as a dried fruit, and are a delicious summer food when fresh.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 236

Protein: 2.6 g

Fat: 1.5 g

Carbohydrates: 59.6 g

Calcium: 49 mg

Phosphorus: 60 mg

Iron: 1.1 mg

Vitamin A: 90 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.8 mg

Riboflavin: 0.16 mg

Niacin: 0.5 mg

Ascorbic acid: 15 mg

Potato

December 12, 2016

The potato is one vegetable that is abundant throughout the year. It comes in many varieties. Though called “Irish”, the white potato is native to the mountains of tropical America from Chile to Mexico, and was widely cultivated in South America at the time of the Spanish Conquest. The Spaniards introduced the potato into Europe early in the sixteenth century, and it was Sir Walter Raleigh who showed England how to eat the potato with beef gravy. He, too, started the potato fad in colonial Virginia, but it was Sir Francis Drake who was supposed to have brought the potato to Ireland. The potato soon became second only to Indian corn as the most important food contribution of the Americas, and is now one of the most valuable vegetable crops in the world.

The potato is classed as a protective vegetable because of its high vitamin C content. It has been noted in the past that, as the potato became common, scurvy, which is prevalent where vitamin C is absent, became uncommon, and soon disappeared almost entirely in potato-eating countries.

If we had to confine ourselves to one food, the potato is the one on which we could live almost indefinitely, exclusive of other foods, as it is a complete food in itself. It was Professor Hinhede of Denmark, a food scientist during the last war, who proved to the world that a person could live on potatoes for a long period of time without any depreciation of body energy. In fact he and his assistant lived three years solely on potatoes-raw and cooked. He not only proved the potato to be a complete food, but he also showed how inexpensive a diet it was at a cost of approximately only six cents a day. It is good, however, to eat potatoes with other vegetables; eating them by themselves may eventually cause constipation.

When selecting potatoes make sure they are smooth, shallow-eyed, and reasonably unblemished. Avoid the extra large .potato as it may have a hollow or pithy center. Potatoes with a slight green color are sunburned and may have developed a bitter taste.

The energy value of the potato is approximately the same as bread, but it is a far better balanced food than bread, particularly in its content of potassium, iron, and vitamins C, B1 , and G. The potato is also lower in calories. Because potatoes are a starchy food, they put less work on the kidneys.

It is best to eat potatoes in as raw a form as possible. However, raw, cut potatoes should be eaten as soon as they are cut, as their oxidation is very rapid. I know of no other food that will turn green, ferment, and break down quicker than potatoes will when they have been juiced.

Potatoes may be sliced raw and used in salads. Juice them, mixed with parsley, beets, or other vegetables for flavor. Potato juice is . a great rejuvenator and is a quick way to get an abundance of vitamin C as well as other vitamins and minerals. Why not munch on a raw potato? It is no more peculiar for a child to eat a piece of raw potato than it is for him to eat a raw apple.

Instead of throwing away the potato peeling, eat it, because it is rich in mineral elements. At least 60 percent of the potassium contained in the potato lies so close to the skin that it cannot be saved if the potato is peeled. Furthermore, potassium is a salt, and you do not need to salt potatoes if the potato peelings are used. If you feel you need more seasoning, use a mineral broth powder (dehydrated vegetables) instead of table salt. Even using sweet butter in place of salted butter is better, and is not difficult to get used to when the flavor is enhanced with the addition of broth powder.

There are numerous ways to prepare and serve potatoes. They have a bland flavor, so they can be used frequently in meals. It is best to cook potatoes on a low heat, if possible, and if they are not baked they should be cooked in a vapor-sealed vessel to retain their goodness. The art of cooking can be used to build or to destroy.

It is necessary that we realize the difference between a properly steamed potato and a boiled potato-one is alkaline and the other is acid. According to the Bureau of Home Economics, United States Department of Agriculture, when ordinary cooking methods are used, from 32 to 76 percent of the essential food values, minerals, and vitamins are lost due to oxidation, or are destroyed by heat or dissolved in water. In a vapor-sealed utensil, oxidation is practically eliminated, less heat is required, and waterless cooking is possible . The vitamins and minerals are preserved for you and are not carried away by escaping steam.

The outside of the potato is the positive side. The negative side is the inside. The inside is carbohydrate and is acid in body reaction. So, it is best, when making alkalinizing broths for example, that you discard the center of the potato before adding the potato to the broth ingredients. Throw this part of the potato into your garden if you have one and it will do its part to rebuild the soil.

In preparing potatoes for cooking, scrub and wash them thoroughly. Use a stiff brush to remove the dirt. To bake, drop them first in very hot water to heat them, then rub them with oil to keep their skins from getting too hard in the process of baking and to help them be more easily digested. Remember to bake them at a slow oven heat. In the last five minutes of baking raise the oven heat to about 400°F to break down the starch grains.

Before serving baked potatoes, they may be cut in half, scooped out, and mashed with nut butter, avocado, or a little grated cheese. Garnish with parsley or chives. Or, take plain, baked potatoes, split open, and serve with a Roquefort, cream, and chive dressing.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Potatoes leave an alkaline ash in the body, are low in roughage, and may be used in the treatment of acidosis. They can also be used for catarrhal conditions.

When trying to overcome catarrhal conditions, cut the potato peeling about a half-inch thick and use it in broth or soup, cooking very little. The resulting broth will contain many important mineral elements.

Potato soup can also be used to great advantage in cases of uric acid, kidney, and stomach disorders, and for replacing minerals in the system. To make potato soup, peel six potatoes, making sure the peelings are about three-quarters of an inch thick. Place in water in a covered kettle and simmer twenty minutes. Add celery to change the flavor if desired. Add okra powder if the stomach is irritated.

The potassium in the potato is strongly alkaline, which makes for good liver activation, elastic tissues, and supple muscles. It also produces body grace and a good disposition. Potassium is the ”healer” of the body and is very necessary in rejuvenation. It is good heart element also, and potatoes can be used very well in all cases of heart troubles.

Anyone with ailments on the left side of the body-the negative side, or the heart and intestinal side of the body-can use carbohydrates that are negative in character. Potatoes are one of the best negative foods to use for building up the left side of the body.

To use an old remedy, take slices of potatoes and use as a pack over any congested part of the body. This type of pack draws out static, toxic material, or venous congestion in any part of the body. Use a narrow, thumb-shaped piece of potato to help correct hemorrhoid conditions.

To control diarrhea, cook potato soup with milk. The milk controls the diarrhea-it has a constipating effect, if boiled. The potato adds bulk, which is also necessary to control this trouble.

The raw potato juice is one of the most volatile juices and the strongest juice that can be taken into the body. It is used in many cases of intestinal disorders, as well as for rejuvenation.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (raw and pared)

Calories 279

Protein 7.6g

Fat 0.4g

Carbohydrates 6.8g

Calcium 26mg

Phosphorus 195mg

Iron 2.7g

Vitamin A trace

Thiamine 0.40mg

Riboflavin 0.15mg

Niacin 4.4 mg

Ascorbic acid 64mg

Grapefruit

December 5, 2016

The name grapefruit originated in the West Indies in the eighteenth century, perhaps because of the fact that its fruit grows in clusters of three to twelve or more, similar to grape clusters. This citrus fruit was cultivated more than 4000 years ago in India and Malaysia, but it was not until the sixteenth century that it was introduced to this country by the Spaniards. For many years it was not popular because of its slightly bitter taste. From 1880 to 1885 a group of Florida grapefruit growers shipped crates of the fruit to Philadelphia and New York and encouraged people to try it. In about 1915 the commercial sale of grapefruit expanded, until its production spread into three other states—California, Arizona, and Texas.

The United States furnishes about 97 percent of the world’s supply of grapefruit, and Florida and Texas together produce about 90 percent of the grapefruit grown in the United States. The Marsh seedless grapefruit is the most popular variety today.

The grapefruit tree is about the size of the orange tree and reaches a height of twenty to forty feet. Like the orange, it blooms in the spring. In California and Arizona, the fruit ripens throughout the year. Although grapefruit is available all year, it is most abundant from January through May. Grapefruit is also imported by the United States from Cuba in the late summer and early fall.

Grapefruit of good quality is firm, but springy to the touch, well-shaped, and heavy for its size—the heavier the fruit, the better. Do not choose soft, wilted, or flabby fruit. The heavy fruits are usually thin-skinned and contain more juice than those with coarse skin or those puffy or spongy to the touch.

Grapefruit often has a reddish brown color over the normal yellow, which is called “russeting.” Russeting does not affect the flavor in any way. Most of the defects found on the skin of the grapefruit are minor and do not affect the eating quality of the fruit. However, fruit with decayed spots is not desirable, as the decay usually affects the flavor. Decay may appear as a soft, discolored area on the stem end of the fruit or it may appear as a colorless area that breaks easily when pressure is applied. If the skin of the fruit appears rough, ridged, or wrinkled, it is likely to be thick-skinned.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Grapefruit is a subtropical acid fruit, and is highly alkaline in reaction. It is best eaten with other acid fruits, nuts, or milk. Eat grapefruit immediately after cutting into the rind to benefit from all of its goodness. For best digestion and assimilation, avoid eating grapefruit with sweeter fruits or with starches. The grapefruit is less acidulous than the lemon and is a good substitute when oranges or their juice cannot be tolerated, or when the alkaline reserves in the body need to be augmented.

Grapefruit is rich in vitamins C and B1, and is a good source of vitamin B12. It is low in calories, which makes it a good drink on a reducing diet. There is less sugar in grapefruit than in oranges. Eat the sun-ripened fruit when possible, as this fruit needs no sweetening, and is better for you. If sweetening is necessary, use a little honey.

Grapefruit is very rich in citric acids and their salts, and in potassium and calcium. Use it often in combination with meats, because grapefruit juice is excellent as an aid in the digestion of meats. However, avoid the overuse of all citric acid fruits as they are a powerful dissolver of the catarrhal accumulations in the body and the elimination of too much toxic material all at once may cause boils, irritated nerves, diarrhea, and other problems. People are often so eager to get vitamins and minerals into the body that they sometimes do not consider that the powerful action of citric acid causes irritation and discomfort.

When taken right before bedtime, grapefruit is conducive to a sound sleep. A drink of grapefruit juice first thing in the morning helps prevent constipation. It is also an excellent aid in reducing fevers from colds and the flu, and seldom causes allergic reactions.

Grapefruit rind contains the very valuable vitamin P, which is an important vitamin for healthy gums and teeth. This vitamin may be extracted by simmering the rind in water for about twenty minutes. Strain, and drink.

The sour taste of grapefruit increases the flow of digestive juices in the stomach. Grapefruit served at the beginning of a meal stimulates the appetite and helps in digestion.

This fruit is also good for any hardening of body tissue, such as hardening of the liver and the arteries. It can also help prevent stone formations.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 133

Protein: 1.5 g

Fat: 0.6 g

Carbohydrates: 30.3 g

Calcium: 51 mg

Phosphorus: 54 mg

Iron: 0.9 mg

Vitamin A: 4770 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.11 mg

Riboflavin: 0.06 mg

Niacin: 0.06 mg

Ascorbic acid: 12 mg

Artichoke

November 28, 2016

The artichoke is believed to be native to the area around the western and central Mediterranean. The Romans were growing artichokes over 2000 years ago, and used it as a green and a salad plant.

Artichokes were brought to England in 1548, and French settlers planted them in Louisiana in the mid-nineteenth century. California is now the center of the artichoke crop, and its peak season is March, April, and May although the crop is also available in November and December.

The name “artichoke” is derived from the northern Italian words “articiocco” and “articoclos”, which refer to what we know to be a pine cone. The artichoke bud does resemble a pine cone.

There is a variety of vegetable called the Jerusalem artichoke, but it is not a true artichoke. It is a tuberous member of the sunflower family. Here, we refer to the two types of true artichokes, the Cardoon (cone-shaped) and the Globe. The most popular variety is the Green Globe.

The artichoke is a large, vigorous plant. It has long, coarse, spiny leaves that can grow to three feet long. The artichoke plants may grow as high as six feet tall.

A perennial, the artichoke grows best in cool, but not freezing, weather. It likes plenty of water, and rain and fog, so is best suited to the California coast, especially the San Francisco area.

For a good quality artichoke, select one that is compact, plump, and heavy, yields slightly to pressure, and has large, tightly clinging, fleshy leaf scales that are a good color. An artichoke that is brown is old or has been injured. An artichoke is overmature when it is open or spreading, the center is fuzzy or dark pink or purple, and the tips and scales are hard. March, April, and May are the months when the artichoke is most abundant.

The parts of the artichoke that are eaten are the fleshy part of the leaves and heart, and the tender base. Medium-sized artichokes are best—large ones tend to be tough and tasteless. They may be served either hot or cold, and make a delicious salad.

To prepare artichokes, cut off the stem and any tough or damaged leaves. Was the artichoke in cold running water, then place in boiling water, and cook twenty to thirty minutes, or until tender. To make the artichoke easier to eat, remove the choke in the center, pull out the top center leaves, and, with a spoon, remove the thistle-like inside.

To eat artichokes, pull off the petal leaves as you would the petals of a daisy, and bite off the end.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Artichoke hearts and leaves have a high alkaline ash. They also have a great deal of roughage, which is not good for those who have inflammation of the bowel. They are good to eat on a reducing diet.

Artichokes contain vitamins A and C, which are good for fighting off infection. They are high in calcium and iron.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (including inedible parts)

Calories: 60

Protein: 5.3 g

Fat: 0.4 g

Carbohydrates: 19.2 g

Calcium: 93 mg

Phosphorus: 160 mg

Iron: 2.4 mg

Vitamin A: 290 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.14 mg

Riboflavin: 0.09 mg

Niacin: 1.7 mg

Ascorbic acid: 22 mg

Cranberry

November 21, 2016

Cranberries are native to the swampy regions of both the temperate and arctic zones of North America and Europe. Because they grow on slender, curved stalks, suggesting the neck of a crane, they were named “crane-berry, “or” cranberry.”

Long before the first colonists arrived in this country the cranberry was in common use by the Indians. The Pilgrims found them in the low marshes near the shore on the Cape Cod peninsula, and the women preserved them as a delicacy and served them with wild turkey at Thanksgiving and Christmas feasts.

Cultivation of the cranberry began early in the nineteenth cen­tury. The earliest records show that the business was largely carried on by retired seamen. Howe and McFarlin were the names of two of these men, and important varieties of cranberries are named for them. By 1870, a flourishing business had developed. It was re­corded in 1832 that ”Captain Henry Hall of Barnstable, Massachu­setts, had then cultivated the cranberry for twenty years,” and that “Mr. F. A. Hayden of Lincoln, Massachusetts, gathered from his farm in 1830, 400 bushels of cranberries which brought him in the Boston market $600.”

It has been said that the old clipper ships out of Gloucester, New Bedford, and the “Down East” ports carried supplies of raw cranberries in casks so that the sailors could help themselves. They did this to prevent scurvy, just as the sailors of England and South­ern Europe used limes to prevent this disease.

Cranberries grow on low, thick vines in a bog. The bogs are built on peat swamps that have been cleared, drained, and leveled. Water must be available and arranged so that the bog can be drained or flooded at the appropriate time. The surface, usually sand, on top of a subsoil that will hold moisture, must be level so the bog can be covered with water to a uniform depth when neces­sary. A cranberry bog takes three to five years to come into full production.

There are only five states that produce the greater supply of cranberries for market. They are, in order of production: Massa­chusetts, Wisconsin, New Jersey, Washington, and Oregon. The berries are marketed from September through March, and the peak months are October, November, and December.

The quality of the berry is determined by its roundness and size, and from its color, which varies from light to dark crimson, depending on the degree of maturity. Some varieties of cranberries are more olive-shaped or oblong. They have a fresh, plump appear­ance combined with a high luster and firmness. Avoid a shriveled, dull, soft-appearing berry.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Cranberries have a heavy acid content, and therefore should not be eaten too frequently. They increase the acidity of the urine. Be­ cause of their extremely tart taste, people drown them in sugar syrup, which makes them unfit for human consumption. They are best if cooked first; then add raisins and a little honey.

One of the finest therapeutic uses for cranberries is as a remedy for rectal disturbances, piles, hemorrhoids, and inflammation of the rectal pouch.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 218

Protein: 1.8g

Fat: 3.18g

Carbohydrates: 51.4g

Calcium: 63.5mg

Phosphorus: 50mg

Iron: 2.7mg

Vitamin A: 182I.U.

Thiamine: .13mg

Riboflavin: .09mg

Niacin: 0.45mg

Ascorbic acid: 55mg

Beet

November 14, 2016

The beet has been cultivated for its roots and leaves since the third or fourth century B.C. It spread from the area of the Mediterranean to the Near East. In ancient times it was used only for medicinal purposes-the edible beet root we know today was unknown before the Christian era. In the fourth century beet recipes were recorded in England, and in 1810 the beet began to be cultivated for sugar in France and Germany. It is not known when the beet was first introduced to the United States, but it is known that there was one variety grown here in 1806. Sugar beets are usually yellowish-white, and are cultivated extensively in this country. The garden beet ranges from dark purplish red to a bright vermilion to white, but the most popular commercial variety is red.

Beets are available in the markets all year. Their peak season is May through October. They are primarily grown in the southern United States, the Northeast, and the vest coast states. When selecting beets, do not just look at the condition of the leaves. Beets that remain to the ground too long become tough and woody, and can be identified by a short neck, deep scars, or several circles of leaf scars around the top of the beet.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Beets are wonderful for adding needed minerals. They can be used to eliminate pocket add material in the bowel and for ailments in the gall bladder and liver. Their vitamin A content is quite high, so they are not only good for the eliminative system, but also benefit the digestive and lymphatic systems.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (without tops)

Calories: 147

Protein: 5.4 g

Fat: 0.3 g

Carbohydrates: 32.6 g

Calcium: 51 mg

Phosphorus: 92 mg

Iron: 3.4 mg

Vitamin A: 22,700 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.07 mg

Riboflavin: 0.16 mg

Niacin: 1.5 mg

Ascorbic acid: 80 mg

Dates

November 7, 2016

One food which dates back in prehistoric times is the date. Here is truly a miracle food which has nourished, sustained and probably imparted life to countless travelers over the sands of time.

While the date is ripened on the tree, the sugar it contains increases until it is completely ripe. At that time, the natural sugar supply could be as much as 75% of the whole food. Those who find they have a “sweet tooth” would be wise to eat some dates when they finish a meal. It’s far healthier than commercial sweets or white sugar products.

M.C. Hetzell, writing about the date in Life and Health, national medical journal, (Vol. 71, No.12) explains that, “Of all fruit-bearing trees the date palm is most unique. For example, there are female date palms and male date palms. Yet, unlike other plants of this type, the flowers of the female are not pollinated via the ambitious migrations of bees or other insects Nor do the gentle breezes perform any expert service on behalf of Mother Nature. It remains for man to clamber aloft among the spiny leaves and shake the pollen from the male blossoms amid the blooms of the female. This service has been so performed for nearly 400 years!”

Because the date palm does not require any pollination, and because it is so self-sufficient, it may be regarded as the healthiest tree in the world! It just cannot be spoiled by improper pollination.

Once the dates are picked, they must be properly ripened. M.C. Hetzel explains, “Today dates are ripened in what are called maturation rooms, which are maintained at uniform temperature and humidity. Aiding also in the even development of the fruit is the brown-bag treatment. One who visits groves in the fall of the year, when the dates are maturing, may be amazed at the sight of what appears to be numerous bottomless brown sacks suspended from stately palms. Wrapped around the great clusters of dates, they repel the birds, who evidently suffer from sweet tooth. They encourage insect visitation. They perform the much needed service of an umbrella in case of rain.”

Dates are picked individually when they ripen. They are ready to be picked when they reach the “khalal stage” which is when they turn from intense red or yellow to the golden or brown hue. Such meticulous care means that the dates you will buy in handy package at the store is rich in natural undisturbed vitamins, minerals and other nutrients.

Originally, dates were grown only in the deserts of the ancient lands of Arabia and the country of the camel and the nomad tribes. So hardy were these dates and so filled with nutritional qualities, that they were the chief food grown at all oasis—caravans would take huge sacks of dates with them—without these dates their prime source of nourishment—it is doubtful they could have survived weeks and weeks of difficult travel. Dates are one of the few foods which thrive in various climates and are not affected by adverse conditions.

At the turn of the 19th century, Dr. T Swingle, a youthful researcher at the Bureau of Plant Industry of the Department of Agriculture, decided to help start America’s date industry. He obtained date tree offshoots or suckers from North Africa and planted them in various parts of the United States. One area was especially favorable—the sun drenched Imperial valleys of California which was excellent soil and ardent climate. The young date trees flourished and matured and produced delicious dates, earning this part of the country the title of the “date growing kingdom” of America. Here, the desert warmth provides the proper climate for date growing irrigation, offer sufficient water—at the base of the palm—and the result is a package of delicious, nutritious dates.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE CUP (100g)

Calories: 66

Protein:: .4g

Fat: ..0g

Carbohydrates: 18g

Calcium: 64mg

Phosphorus: 62mg

Iron: .90mg

Vitamin A: 149 I.U.

Thiamine: .05mg

Riboflavin: .06mg

Niacin: 1.6mg

Ascorbic Acid: 0mg

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