Foundation for Advancement in Cancer Therapy

Non-Traditional Approaches to
the Theories, Treatments and Prevention of Cancer

Broccoli

February 4, 2019

Broccoli was grown in France and Italy in the sixteenth century, but was not well known in this country until 1923, when the D’Arrigo Brothers Company made a trial planting of Italian sprouting broccoli in California. A few crates of this were sent to Boston, and by 1925 the market was well established. Since then, the demand for broccoli has been steadily on the increase.

Broccoli is a member of the cabbage family. California, Arizona, and Texas are the main broccoli-producing states.

When choosing broccoli, look for tenderness in the stalk, especially the upper portion. If the lower portion of the stalk is tough and woody, and if the bud dusters are open and yellow, the broccoli is over mature and will be tough. Fresh broccoli does not keep, so purchase only as much as you can immediately use.

Broccoli is often gas-forming, but if cooked in a steamer or over a very low fire, this may be avoided. Broccoli is best if under-cooked, because the more green that is left in broccoli, the more chlorophyll will be left to counteract the sulfur compounds that form gas.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

All of the foods in the cabbage family, including broccoli, are best if eaten with proteins, because the combination helps drive amino acids to the brain. Broccoli is high in vitamins A and C, and is low in calories. It is beneficial to the elimination system.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 103

Protein: 9.1 g

Fat: 0.6 g

Carbohydrates: 15.2 g

Calcium: 360 mg

Phosphorus: 211 mg

Iron: 5.6 mg

Vitamin A: 9,700 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.26 mg

Riboflavin: 0.59 mg

Niacin: 2.5 mg

Ascorbic acid: 327 mg

Broccoli

April 23, 2018

Broccoli was grown in France and Italy in the sixteenth century, but was not well known in this country until 1923, when the D’Arrigo Brothers Company made a trial planting of Italian sprouting broccoli in California. A few crates of this were sent to Boston, and by 1925 the market was well established. Since then, the demand for broccoli has been steadily on the increase.

Broccoli is a member of the cabbage family. California, Arizona, and Texas are the main broccoli-producing states.

When choosing broccoli, look for tenderness in the stalk, especially the upper portion. If the lower portion of the stalk is tough and woody, and if the bud dusters are open and yellow, the b m – wli is over-mature and will be tough. Fresh broccoli does not keep, so purchase only as much as you can immediately use.

Broccoli is often gas-forming, but if cooked in a steamer or over a very low fire, this may be avoided. Broccoli is best if under-cooked, because the more green that is left in broccoli, the more chlorophyll will be left to counteract the sulfur compounds that form gas.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

All of the foods in the cabbage family, including broccoli, are best if eaten with proteins, because the combination helps drive amino acids to the brain. Broccoli is high in vitamins A and C, and is low in calories. It is beneficial to the eliminative system.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 103

Protein: 9.1 g

Fat: 0.6 g

Carbohydrates: 15.2 g

Calcium: 360 mg

Phosphorus: 211 mg

Iron: 5.6 mg

Vitamin A: 9,700 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.26 mg

Riboflavin: 0.59 mg

Niacin: 2.5 mg

Ascorbic acid: 327 mg

Broccoli

February 19, 2018

Broccoli was grown in France and Italy in the sixteenth century, but was not well known in this country until 1923, when the D’Arrigo Brothers Company made a trial planting of Italian sprouting broccoli in California. A few crates of this were sent to Boston, and by 1925 the market was well established. Since then, the demand for broccoli has been steadily on the increase.

Broccoli is a member of the cabbage family. California, Arizona, and Texas are the main broccoli-producing states.

When choosing broccoli, look for tenderness in the stalk, especially the upper portion. If the lower portion of the stalk is tough and woody, and if the bud dusters are open and yellow, the b m – wli is over-mature and will be tough. Fresh broccoli does not keep, so purchase only as much as you can immediately use.

Broccoli is often gas-forming, but if cooked in a steamer or over a very low fire, this may be avoided. Broccoli is best if under-cooked, because the more green that is left in broccoli, the more chlorophyll will be left to counteract the sulfur compounds that form gas.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

All of the foods in the cabbage family, including broccoli, are best if eaten with proteins, because the combination helps drive amino acids to the brain. Broccoli is high in vitamins A and C, and is low in calories. It is beneficial to the eliminative system.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 103

Protein: 9.1 g

Fat: 0.6 g

Carbohydrates: 15.2 g

Calcium: 360 mg

Phosphorus: 211 mg

Iron: 5.6 mg

Vitamin A: 9,700 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.26 mg

Riboflavin: 0.59 mg

Niacin: 2.5 mg

Ascorbic acid: 327 mg

Broccoli

August 28, 2017

Broccoli was grown in France and Italy in the sixteenth century, but was not well known in this country until 1923, when the D’Arrigo Brothers Company made a trial planting of Italian sprouting broccoli in California. A few crates of this were sent to Boston, and by 1925 the market was well established. Since then, the demand for broccoli has been steadily on the increase.

Broccoli is a member of the cabbage family. California, Arizona, and Texas are the main broccoli-producing states.

When choosing broccoli, look for tenderness in the stalk, espcially the upper portion. If the lower portion of the stalk is tough and woody, and if the bud dusters are open and yellow, the broccoli is over mature and will be tough. Fresh broccoli does not keep, so purchase only as much as you can immediately use.

Broccoli is often gas-forming, but if cooked in a steamer or over a very low fire, this may be avoided. Broccoli is best if under-cooked, because the more green that is left in broccoli, the more chlorophyll will be left to counteract the sulfur compounds that form gas.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

All of the foods in the cabbage family, including broccoli, are best if eaten with proteins, because the combination helps drive amino acids to the brain. Broccoli is high in vitamins A and C, and is low in calories. It is beneficial to the elimination system.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 103

Protein: 9.1 g

Fat: 0.6 g

Carbohydrates: 15.2 g

Calcium: 360 mg

Phosphorus: 211 mg

Iron: 5.6 mg

Vitamin A: 9,700 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.26 mg

Riboflavin: 0.59 mg

Niacin: 2.5 mg

Ascorbic acid: 327 mg

Broccoli

September 19, 2016

Broccoli was grown in France and Italy in the sixteenth century, but was not well known in this country until 1923, when the D’Arrigo Brothers Company made a trial planting of Italian sprouting broccoli in California. A few crates of this were sent to Boston, and by 1925 the market was well established. Since then, the demand for broccoli has been steadily on the increase.

Broccoli is a member of the cabbage family. California, Arizona, and Texas are the main broccoli-producing states.

When choosing broccoli, look for tenderness in the stalk, espcially the upper portion. If the lower portion of the stalk is tough and woody, and if the bud dusters are open and yellow, the broccoli is over mature and will be tough. Fresh broccoli does not keep, so purchase only as much as you can immediately use.

Broccoli is often gas-forming, but if cooked in a steamer or over a very low fire, this may be avoided. Broccoli is best if under-cooked, because the more green that is left in broccoli, the more chlorophyll will be left to counteract the sulfur compounds that form gas.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

All of the foods in the cabbage family, including broccoli, are best if eaten with proteins, because the combination helps drive amino acids to the brain. Broccoli is high in vitamins A and C, and is low in calories. It is beneficial to the elimination system.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 103

Protein: 9.1 g

Fat: 0.6 g

Carbohydrates: 15.2 g

Calcium: 360 mg

Phosphorus: 211 mg

Iron: 5.6 mg

Vitamin A: 9,700 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.26 mg

Riboflavin: 0.59 mg

Niacin: 2.5 mg

Ascorbic acid: 327 mg

Broccoli

February 15, 2016

Broccoli was grown in France and Italy in the sixteenth century, but was not well known in this country until 1923, when the D”Arrigo Brothers Company made a trial planting of Italian sprouting broccoli in California. A few crates of this were sent to Boston, and by 1925 the market was well established. Since then, the demand for broccoli has been steadily on the increase.

Broccoli is a member of the cabbage family. California, Arizona, and Texas are the main broccoli-producing states.

When choosing broccoli, look for tenderness in the stalk, espcially the upper portion. If the lower portion of the stalk is tough and woody, and if the bud dusters are open and yellow, the broccoli is over mature and will be tough. Fresh broccoli does not keep, so purchase only as much as you can immediately use.

Broccoli is often gas-forming, but if cooked in a steamer or over a very low fire, this may be avoided. Broccoli is best if under-cooked, because the more green that is left in broccoli, the more chlorophyll will be left to counteract the sulfur compounds that form gas.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

All of the foods in the cabbage family, including broccoli, are best if eaten with proteins, because the combination helps drive amino acids to the brain. Broccoli is high in vitamins A and C, and is low in calories. It is beneficial to the elimination system.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 103

Protein: 9.1 g

Fat: 0.6 g

Carbohydrates: 15.2 g

Calcium: 360 mg

Phosphorus: 211 mg

Iron: 5.6 mg

Vitamin A: 9,700 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.26 mg

Riboflavin: 0.59 mg

Niacin: 2.5 mg

Ascorbic acid: 327 mg

Broccoli

September 14, 2015

Broccoli was grown in France and Italy in the sixteenth century, but was not well known in this country until 1923, when the D’Arrigo Brothers Company made a trial planting of Italian sprouting broccoli in California. A few crates of this were sent to Boston, and by 1925 the market was well established. Since then, the demand for broccoli has been steadily on the increase.

Broccoli is a member of the cabbage family. California, Arizona, and Texas are the main broccoli-producing states.

When choosing broccoli, look for tenderness in the stalk, espcially the upper portion. If the lower portion of the stalk is tough and woody, and if the bud dusters are open and yellow, the broccoli is over mature and will be tough. Fresh broccoli does not keep, so purchase only as much as you can immediately use.

Broccoli is often gas-forming, but if cooked in a steamer or over a very low fire, this may be avoided. Broccoli is best if under-cooked, because the more green that is left in broccoli, the more chlorophyll will be left to counteract the sulfur compounds that form gas.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

All of the foods in the cabbage family, including broccoli, are best if eaten with proteins, because the combination helps drive amino acids to the brain. Broccoli is high in vitamins A and C, and is low in calories. It is beneficial to the elimination system.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 103

Protein: 9.1 g

Fat: 0.6 g

Carbohydrates: 15.2 g

Calcium: 360 mg

Phosphorus: 211 mg

Iron: 5.6 mg

Vitamin A: 9,700 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.26 mg

Riboflavin: 0.59 mg

Niacin: 2.5 mg

Ascorbic acid: 327 mg

Broccoli

February 10, 2014

Broccoli was grown in France and Italy in the sixteenth century, but was not well known in this country until 1923, when the D’Arrigo Brothers Company made a trial planting of Italian sprouting broccoli in California. A few crates of this were sent to Boston, and by 1925 the market was well established. Since then, the demand for broccoli has been steadily on the increase.

Broccoli is a member of the cabbage family. California, Arizona, and Texas are the main broccoli-producing states.

When choosing broccoli, look for tenderness in the stalk, especially the upper portion. If the lower portion of the stalk is tough and woody, and if the bud dusters are open and yellow, the broccoli is over-mature and will be tough. Fresh broccoli does not keep, so purchase only as much as you can immediately use.

Broccoli is often gas-forming, but if cooked in a steamer or over a very low fire, this may be avoided. Broccoli is best if under-cooked, because the more green that is left in broccoli, the more chlorophyll will be left to counteract the sulfur compounds that form gas.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

All of the foods in the cabbage family, including broccoli, are best if eaten with proteins, because the combination helps drive amino acids to the brain. Broccoli is high in vitamins A and C, and is low in calories. It is beneficial to the eliminative system.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 103

Protein: 9.1 g

Fat: 0.6 g

Carbohydrates: 15.2 g

Calcium: 360 mg

Phosphorus: 211 mg

Iron: 5.6 mg

Vitamin A: 9,700 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.26 mg

Riboflavin: 0.59 mg

Niacin: 2.5 mg

Ascorbic acid: 327 mg

Broccoli

February 11, 2013

Broccoli was grown in France and Italy in the sixteenth century, but was not well known in this country until 1923, when the D’Arrigo Brothers Company made a trial planting of Italian sprouting broccoli in California. A few crates of this were sent to Boston, and by 1925 the market was well established. Since then, the demand for broccoli has been steadily on the increase.

Broccoli is a member of the cabbage family. California, Arizona, and Texas are the main broccoli-producing states.

When choosing broccoli, look for tenderness in the stalk, especially the upper portion. If the lower portion of the stalk is tough and woody, and if the bud dusters are open and yellow, the broccoli is over-mature and will be tough. Fresh broccoli does not keep, so purchase only as much as you can immediately use.

Broccoli is often gas-forming, but if cooked in a steamer or over a very low fire, this may be avoided. Broccoli is best if under-cooked, because the more green that is left in broccoli, the more chlorophyll will be left to counteract the sulfur compounds that form gas.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

All of the foods in the cabbage family, including broccoli, are best if eaten with proteins, because the combination helps drive amino acids to the brain. Broccoli is high in vitamins A and C, and is low in calories. It is beneficial to the eliminative system.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 103

Protein: 9.1 g

Fat: 0.6 g

Carbohydrates: 15.2 g

Calcium: 360 mg

Phosphorus: 211 mg

Iron: 5.6 mg

Vitamin A: 9,700 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.26 mg

Riboflavin: 0.59 mg

Niacin: 2.5 mg

Ascorbic acid: 327 mg

Broccoli

October 1, 2012

Broccoli was grown in France and Italy in the sixteenth century, but was not well known in this country until 1923, when the D’Arrigo Brothers Company made a trial planting of Italian sprouting broccoli in California. A few crates of this were sent to Boston, and by 1925 the market was well established. Since then, the demand for broccoli has been steadily on the increase.

Broccoli is a member of the cabbage family. California, Arizona, and Texas are the main broccoli-producing states.

When choosing broccoli, look for tenderness in the stalk, especially the upper portion. If the lower portion of the stalk is tough and woody, and if the bud dusters are open and yellow, the b m – wli is over-mature and will be tough. Fresh broccoli does not keep, so purchase only as much as you can immediately use.

Broccoli is often gas-forming, but if cooked in a steamer or over a very low fire, this may be avoided. Broccoli is best if under-cooked, because the more green that is left in broccoli, the more chlorophyll will be left to counteract the sulfur compounds that form gas.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

All of the foods in the cabbage family, including broccoli, are best if eaten with proteins, because the combination helps drive amino acids to the brain. Broccoli is high in vitamins A and C, and is low in calories. It is beneficial to the eliminative system.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 103

Protein: 9.1 g

Fat: 0.6 g

Carbohydrates: 15.2 g

Calcium: 360 mg

Phosphorus: 211 mg

Iron: 5.6 mg

Vitamin A: 9,700 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.26 mg

Riboflavin: 0.59 mg

Niacin: 2.5 mg

Ascorbic acid: 327 mg

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