Foundation for Advancement in Cancer Therapy

Non-Traditional Approaches to
the Theories, Treatments and Prevention of Cancer

Pineapple

December 11, 2017

Pineapples were cultivated in the West Indies long before Columbus visited there. But after his voyage to the island of Guadeloupe, it was recorded in Spain that Columbus had “discovered” the fruit. The pineapple is native to tropical America and was known to the Indians as na-na, meaning fragrance, and to the Spanish explorers as piiia, because of its resemblance to a pine cone.

History does not record how pineapples first reached Hawaii. For many years they grew wild. Then, a young Bostonian started commercial production of them there in 1901 on twelve acres of land. His company has enlarged to the present 25,000 acres. The plant of this fruit grows from two to four feet high, with a rosette of stiff, sword-shaped leaves growing from its base. Out of the rosette center grows a single, fleshy, scaly-coated fruit that is four to ten inches long. A cluster of sword-shaped leaves surmounts the fruit.

Pineapples are grown in many parts of the world, but the United States is supplied principally from Cuba, Mexico, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico. They may be obtained all year long, but are most abundant from March through July. The peak months are June and July.

A ripe pineapple in quality condition has a fresh, clean appearance, a distinctive darkish orange-yellow color, and a decided fragrance. The “eyes” of the fruit are flat and almost hollow. If the fruit is mature it is usually heavier in proportion to its size. To test for ripeness, pull at the spikes. If they pull out easily, the fruit is ripe; discolored areas, or soft spots, are an indication of bruised fruit.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

High in vitamin C, the pineapple is considered to be a protective fruit. It is wonderful for constipation and poor digestion. The pineapple helps digest proteins, and can be used in elimination diets. It leaves an alkaline ash in the body. Pineapple is thought to have a certain amount of iodine because it grows near the ocean. When buying canned pineapple, make sure it is unsweetened. Pineapple goes well with fruit and nuts, and is good to eat on a fruit diet.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories 123

Protein 1g

Fat 0.5g

Carbohydrates 33g

Calcium 39mg Niacin 0.5mg

Phosphorus 19mg Ascorbic acid 40mg

Iron 1.2mg

Vitamin A: 170 I.U.

Thiamine 0.20mg

Potato

December 4, 2017

The potato is one vegetable that is abundant throughout the year. It comes in many varieties. Though called “Irish”, the white potato is native to the mountains of tropical America from Chile to Mexico, and was widely cultivated in South America at the time of the Spanish Conquest. The Spaniards introduced the potato into Europe early in the sixteenth century, and it was Sir Walter Raleigh who showed England how to eat the potato with beef gravy. He, too, started the potato fad in colonial Virginia, but it was Sir Francis Drake who was supposed to have brought the potato to Ireland. The potato soon became second only to Indian corn as the most important food contribution of the Americas, and is now one of the most valuable vegetable crops in the world.

The potato is classed as a protective vegetable because of its high vitamin C content. It has been noted in the past that, as the potato became common, scurvy, which is prevalent where vitamin C is absent, became uncommon, and soon disappeared almost entirely in potato-eating countries.

If we had to confine ourselves to one food, the potato is the one on which we could live almost indefinitely, exclusive of other foods, as it is a complete food in itself. It was Professor Hinhede of Denmark, a food scientist during the last war, who proved to the world that a person could live on potatoes for a long period of time without any depreciation of body energy. In fact he and his assistant lived three years solely on potatoes-raw and cooked. He not only proved the potato to be a complete food, but he also showed how inexpensive a diet it was at a cost of approximately only six cents a day. It is good, however, to eat potatoes with other vegetables; eating them by themselves may eventually cause constipation.

When selecting potatoes make sure they are smooth, shallow-eyed, and reasonably unblemished. Avoid the extra large .potato as it may have a hollow or pithy center. Potatoes with a slight green color are sunburned and may have developed a bitter taste.

The energy value of the potato is approximately the same as bread, but it is a far better balanced food than bread, particularly in its content of potassium, iron, and vitamins C, B1 , and G. The potato is also lower in calories. Because potatoes are a starchy food, they put less work on the kidneys.

It is best to eat potatoes in as raw a form as possible. However, raw, cut potatoes should be eaten as soon as they are cut, as their oxidation is very rapid. I know of no other food that will turn green, ferment, and break down quicker than potatoes will when they have been juiced.

Potatoes may be sliced raw and used in salads. Juice them, mixed with parsley, beets, or other vegetables for flavor. Potato juice is . a great rejuvenator and is a quick way to get an abundance of vitamin C as well as other vitamins and minerals. Why not munch on a raw potato? It is no more peculiar for a child to eat a piece of raw potato than it is for him to eat a raw apple.

Instead of throwing away the potato peeling, eat it, because it is rich in mineral elements. At least 60 percent of the potassium contained in the potato lies so close to the skin that it cannot be saved if the potato is peeled. Furthermore, potassium is a salt, and you do not need to salt potatoes if the potato peelings are used. If you feel you need more seasoning, use a mineral broth powder (dehydrated vegetables) instead of table salt. Even using sweet butter in place of salted butter is better, and is not difficult to get used to when the flavor is enhanced with the addition of broth powder.

There are numerous ways to prepare and serve potatoes. They have a bland flavor, so they can be used frequently in meals. It is best to cook potatoes on a low heat, if possible, and if they are not baked they should be cooked in a vapor-sealed vessel to retain their goodness. The art of cooking can be used to build or to destroy.

It is necessary that we realize the difference between a properly steamed potato and a boiled potato-one is alkaline and the other is acid. According to the Bureau of Home Economics, United States Department of Agriculture, when ordinary cooking methods are used, from 32 to 76 percent of the essential food values, minerals, and vitamins are lost due to oxidation, or are destroyed by heat or dissolved in water. In a vapor-sealed utensil, oxidation is practically eliminated, less heat is required, and waterless cooking is possible . The vitamins and minerals are preserved for you and are not carried away by escaping steam.

The outside of the potato is the positive side. The negative side is the inside. The inside is carbohydrate and is acid in body reaction. So, it is best, when making alkalinizing broths for example, that you discard the center of the potato before adding the potato to the broth ingredients. Throw this part of the potato into your garden if you have one and it will do its part to rebuild the soil.

In preparing potatoes for cooking, scrub and wash them thoroughly. Use a stiff brush to remove the dirt. To bake, drop them first in very hot water to heat them, then rub them with oil to keep their skins from getting too hard in the process of baking and to help them be more easily digested. Remember to bake them at a slow oven heat. In the last five minutes of baking raise the oven heat to about 400°F to break down the starch grains.

Before serving baked potatoes, they may be cut in half, scooped out, and mashed with nut butter, avocado, or a little grated cheese. Garnish with parsley or chives. Or, take plain, baked potatoes, split open, and serve with a Roquefort, cream, and chive dressing.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Potatoes leave an alkaline ash in the body, are low in roughage, and may be used in the treatment of acidosis. They can also be used for catarrhal conditions.

When trying to overcome catarrhal conditions, cut the potato peeling about a half-inch thick and use it in broth or soup, cooking very little. The resulting broth will contain many important mineral elements.

Potato soup can also be used to great advantage in cases of uric acid, kidney, and stomach disorders, and for replacing minerals in the system. To make potato soup, peel six potatoes, making sure the peelings are about three-quarters of an inch thick. Place in water in a covered kettle and simmer twenty minutes. Add celery to change the flavor if desired. Add okra powder if the stomach is irritated.

The potassium in the potato is strongly alkaline, which makes for good liver activation, elastic tissues, and supple muscles. It also produces body grace and a good disposition. Potassium is the ”healer” of the body and is very necessary in rejuvenation. It is good heart element also, and potatoes can be used very well in all cases of heart troubles.

Anyone with ailments on the left side of the body-the negative side, or the heart and intestinal side of the body-can use carbohydrates that are negative in character. Potatoes are one of the best negative foods to use for building up the left side of the body.

To use an old remedy, take slices of potatoes and use as a pack over any congested part of the body. This type of pack draws out static, toxic material, or venous congestion in any part of the body. Use a narrow, thumb-shaped piece of potato to help correct hemorrhoid conditions.

To control diarrhea, cook potato soup with milk. The milk controls the diarrhea-it has a constipating effect, if boiled. The potato adds bulk, which is also necessary to control this trouble.

The raw potato juice is one of the most volatile juices and the strongest juice that can be taken into the body. It is used in many cases of intestinal disorders, as well as for rejuvenation.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (raw and pared)

Calories 279

Protein 7.6g

Fat 0.4g

Carbohydrates 6.8g

Calcium 26mg

Phosphorus 195mg

Iron 2.7g

Vitamin A trace

Thiamine 0.40mg

Riboflavin 0.15mg

Niacin 4.4 mg

Ascorbic acid 64mg

Celery

November 27, 2017

Celery has long been native to marshy regions extending from Sweden southward to Algeria, Egypt, and Ethiopia. Ancient Oriental people gathered wild celery and brewed it as a medicinal herb for stomach maladies and for a general tonic. Wild celery has a bitter flavor and pungent odor. The early physicians seemed to think that the worse a concoction tasted, the better it was for the patient. The ancient Greeks valued it highly, and awarded celery as a prize to winners in many of their sport contests.

There is mention of a cultivated variety of celery grown in France in 1623, and in 1776 celery seed was sold in England for the growing of plants to be used in flavoring soups and stews. Celery has been grown commercially in the United States since about 1880.

Celery belongs to the same plant family as carrots, parsley, fennel, caraway, and anise. The characteristic flavor of these plants is from the volatile oils found in the stems, leaves, and seeds.

California and Florida are the two leading celery producing states, but celery is also grown in many other states in the eastern and western United States. Celery is available all year, but its peak season is November through May. Study the market in your state and plan to use celery in abundance during the months when celery is in season.

The most desirable celery is of medium length, thickness, and solidity. The stalks should be brittle enough to snap easily. Pithy or stringy celery is not good to eat and probably has less vitamin and mineral content.

The pithiness of a celery stalk can be detected by pressing or twisting the stalk, and stringiness can be detected by breaking the stalk. Celery that has formed a seed stem probably has a poor flavor and may be bitter.

Celery is highly perishable, and should be kept refrigerated. To prepare for eating, scrub and wash thorottghly to be sure all poisonous sprays are removed. Before the tops of celery are used, they should be separated, and washed several times. If you are cooking celery tops, douse. them in water that is slightly warn1 to insure a thorough washing.

If you are cooking celery, steam it only long enough to break down the fibers, or cook it a few minutes in a vessel with a tight lid. Use very little water. Cooked celery takes only about three hours to digest. Celery is also delicious in soup and as a seasoning in almost all cooked food.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Celery is fairly high in roughage and low in calories. Its high water content makes it an especially good food to eat with foods that are more concentrated, particularly heavy starches. It is an alkaline food and should be classified as a protective food. The greener stalks of celery are an especially good source of vitamin A and celery is also a good source of vitamins B1 and G. It is rich in chlorine, sodium, potassium, and magnesium.

As an all-around maintainer of good health, celery juice gets top billing. It is good by itself or mixed with other vegetable juices,and goes best with carrot, carrot and parsley, or apple. Celery can be juiced with fruits, vegetables, or nuts for a complete, easily digested meal.

Celery is generally known as a sodium food, and sodium is what we call the youth maintainer in the body. Sodium helps keep us young and active, and the muscles limber and pliable. Whenever there is a stiffness in the joints and creaking or cracking in the knees, we know we are lacking in sodium. Sodium is the one element that most people lack.

When the tissues, joints, and arteries get hard, there is too much calcium in the body, and a softer element is needed. The element that counteracts calcium best is sodium. It helps keep calcium in solution.

Celery should be eaten often because it is one of the best foods for keeping the body well. It neutralizes acids and is a good blood cleanser. It has protective properties that are beneficial to both the brain and the nervous system. Celery is an excellent food for people suffering from arthritis, neuritis, and rheumatism. It can help to clear up high blood pressure.

Sodium is one of the chemical elements needed so much in the walls of the stomach and in the intestinal tract. Celery is particularly good for these parts of the body. However, many times celery can be very irritating to a sensitive stomach because it contains a great deal of fiber. If irritation results, celery juice should be substituted. It is also best to avoid using raw celery leaves if there is any stomach irritation. Broths made of celery leaves, with other vegetables and milk or cream added, are good. to take for stomach disturbance. The milk or cream has a wonderful soothing effect on the stomach, especially when there is excessive acidity. A broth made with celery and other vegetables is also good in an elimination diet.

Celery aids digestion, counteracts acidosis, halts fermentation, and purifies the bloodstream. Celery juice can be handled and tolerated by most people, especially children. However, many people prefer diluted celery juice, and it is very good when combined with pineapple or apple juice. Apple and celery juice combined is great for neutralizing the rheumatic acids in the body. Combine celery, parsley, and asparagus juice for kidney disorders; celery and papaya juice for asthma; celery and grapefruit juice with a pinch of pure cream of tartar for colds or sinus troubles; celery and parsley juice for fevers, gout, or arthritis; and, if t~e condition of the teeth is poor, combine beet greens, parsley, celery juice, and green kale. It is a non-starchy vegetable.

Celery is best eaten raw, preferably in the form of combination vegetable salads. Use it as a balance in high protein salads such as chicken, tuna, or shrimp. Celery is particularly flavorful when cooked with tomatoes or green peppers. Its pot liquor is especially good as a base in soups and sauces.

The leaves of celery are rich in potassium, sodium, and sulfur. The raw leaves or tops are excellent irt the treatment of diabetes. Because they are so tough, they should be chopped, liquefied, and added to other vegetables to lessen the~ir strong taste. When eaten raw, the leaves are beneficial to the nerves and disorders resulting from nervous conditions. Celery leaves are also good for all acid conditions of the body.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (one pound of celery contains 93 percent water)

Calories: 218

Protein: 1.8 g

Fat: 3.18 g

Carbohydrates: 51.4 g

Calcium: 63.5 mg

Phosphorus: 50 mg

Iron: 2.7 mg

Vitamin A: 182 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.13 mg

Riboflavin: 0.09 mg

Niacin: .45 mg

Ascorbic acid: 55 mg

Cranberry

November 20, 2017

Cranberries are native to the swampy regions of both the temperate and arctic zones of North America and Europe. Because they grow on slender, curved stalks, suggesting the neck of a crane, they were named “crane-berry”, or “cranberry”.

Long before the first colonists arrived in this country the cranberry was in common use by the Native Americans. The Pilgrims found them in the low marshes near the shore on the Cape Cod peninsula, and the women preserved them as a delicacy and served them with wild turkey at Thanksgiving and Christmas feasts.

Cultivation of the cranberry began early in the nineteenth cen­tury. The earliest records show that the business was largely carried on by retired seamen. Howe and McFarlin were the names of two of these men, and important varieties of cranberries are named for them. By 1870, a flourishing business had developed. It was re­corded in 1832 that ”Captain Henry Hall of Barnstable, Massachu­setts, had then cultivated the cranberry for twenty years,” and that “Mr. F. A. Hayden of Lincoln, Massachusetts, gathered from his farm in 1830, 400 bushels of cranberries which brought him in the Boston market $600.”

It has been said that the old clipper ships out of Gloucester, New Bedford, and the “Down East” ports carried supplies of raw cranberries in casks so that the sailors could help themselves. They did this to prevent scurvy, just as the sailors of England and South­ern Europe used limes to prevent this disease.

Cranberries grow on low, thick vines in a bog. The bogs are built on peat swamps that have been cleared, drained, and leveled. Water must be available and arranged so that the bog can be drained or flooded at the appropriate time. The surface, usually sand, on top of a subsoil that will hold moisture, must be level so the bog can be covered with water to a uniform depth when neces­sary. A cranberry bog takes three to five years to come into full production.

There are only five states that produce the greater supply of cranberries for market. They are, in order of production: Massa­chusetts, Wisconsin, New Jersey, Washington, and Oregon. The berries are marketed from September through March, and the peak months are October, November, and December.

The quality of the berry is determined by its roundness and size, and from its color, which varies from light to dark crimson, depending on the degree of maturity. Some varieties of cranberries are more olive-shaped or oblong. They have a fresh, plump appear­ance combined with a high luster and firmness. Avoid a shriveled, dull, soft-appearing berry.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Cranberries have a heavy acid content, and therefore should not be eaten too frequently. They increase the acidity of the urine. Be­ cause of their extremely tart taste, people drown them in sugar syrup, which makes them unfit for human consumption. They are best if cooked first; then add raisins and a little honey.

One of the finest therapeutic uses for cranberries is as a remedy for rectal disturbances, piles, hemorrhoids, and inflammation of the rectal pouch.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 218

Protein: 1.8g

Fat: 3.18g

Carbohydrates: 51.4g

Calcium: 63.5mg

Phosphorus: 50mg

Iron: 2.7mg

Vitamin A: 182I.U.

Thiamine: .13mg

Riboflavin: .09mg

Niacin: 0.45mg

Ascorbic acid: 55mg

Potato and Sweet Potato

November 13, 2017

The potato is one vegetable that is abundant throughout the year. It comes in many varieties. Though called “Irish”, the white potato is native to the mountains of tropical America from Chile to Mexico, and was widely cultivated in South America at the time of the Spanish Conquest. The Spaniards introduced the potato into Europe early in the sixteenth century, and it was Sir Walter Raleigh who showed England how to eat the potato with beef gravy. He, too, started the potato fad in colonial Virginia, but it was Sir Francis Drake who was supposed to have brought the potato to Ireland. The potato soon became second only to Indian corn as the most important food contribution of the Americas, and is now one of the most valuable vegetable crops in the world.

The potato is classed as a protective vegetable because of its high vitamin C content. It has been noted in the past that, as the potato became common, scurvy, which is prevalent where vitamin C is absent, became uncommon, and soon disappeared almost entirely in potato-eating countries.

If we had to confine ourselves to one food, the potato is the one on which we could live almost indefinitely, exclusive of other foods, as it is a complete food in itself. It was Professor Hinhede of Denmark, a food scientist during the last war, who proved to the world that a person could live on potatoes for a long period of time without any depreciation of body energy. In fact he and his assistant lived three years solely on potatoes-raw and cooked. He not only proved the potato to be a complete food, but he also showed how inexpensive a diet it was at a cost of approximately only six cents a day. It is good, however, to eat potatoes with other vegetables; eating them by themselves may eventually cause constipation.

When selecting potatoes make sure they are smooth, shallow-eyed, and reasonably unblemished. Avoid the extra large .potato as it may have a hollow or pithy center. Potatoes with a slight green color are sunburned and may have developed a bitter taste.

The energy value of the potato is approximately the same as bread, but it is a far better balanced food than bread, particularly in its content of potassium, iron, and vitamins C, B1 , and G. The potato is also lower in calories. Because potatoes are a starchy food, they put less work on the kidneys.

It is best to eat potatoes in as raw a form as possible. However, raw, cut potatoes should be eaten as soon as they are cut, as their oxidation is very rapid. I know of no other food that will turn green, ferment, and break down quicker than potatoes will when they have been juiced.

Potatoes may be sliced raw and used in salads. Juice them, mixed with parsley, beets, or other vegetables for flavor. Potato juice is . a great rejuvenator and is a quick way to get an abundance of vitamin C as well as other vitamins and minerals. Why not munch on a raw potato? It is no more peculiar for a child to eat a piece of raw potato than it is for him to eat a raw apple.

Instead of throwing away the potato peeling, eat it, because it is rich in mineral elements. At least 60 percent of the potassium contained in the potato lies so close to the skin that it cannot be saved if the potato is peeled. Furthermore, potassium is a salt, and you do not need to salt potatoes if the potato peelings are used. If you feel you need more seasoning, use a mineral broth powder (dehydrated vegetables) instead of table salt. Even using sweet butter in place of salted butter is better, and is not difficult to get used to when the flavor is enhanced with the addition of broth powder.

There are numerous ways to prepare and serve potatoes. They have a bland flavor, so they can be used frequently in meals. It is best to cook potatoes on a low heat, if possible, and if they are not baked they should be cooked in a vapor-sealed vessel to retain their goodness. The art of cooking can be used to build or to destroy.

It is necessary that we realize the difference between a properly steamed potato and a boiled potato-one is alkaline and the other is acid. According to the Bureau of Home Economics, United States Department of Agriculture, when ordinary cooking methods are used, from 32 to 76 percent of the essential food values, minerals, and vitamins are lost due to oxidation, or are destroyed by heat or dissolved in water. In a vapor-sealed utensil, oxidation is practically eliminated, less heat is required, and waterless cooking is possible . The vitamins and minerals are preserved for you and are not carried away by escaping steam.

The outside of the potato is the positive side. The negative side is the inside. The inside is carbohydrate and is acid in body reaction. So, it is best, when making alkalinizing broths for example, that you discard the center of the potato before adding the potato to the broth ingredients. Throw this part of the potato into your garden if you have one and it will do its part to rebuild the soil.

In preparing potatoes for cooking, scrub and wash them thoroughly. Use a stiff brush to remove the dirt. To bake, drop them first in very hot water to heat them, then rub them with oil to keep their skins from getting too hard in the process of baking and to help them be more easily digested. Remember to bake them at a slow oven heat. In the last five minutes of baking raise the oven heat to about 400°F to break down the starch grains.

Before serving baked potatoes, they may be cut in half, scooped out, and mashed with nut butter, avocado, or a little grated cheese. Garnish with parsley or chives. Or, take plain, baked potatoes, split open, and serve with a Roquefort, cream, and chive dressing.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Potatoes leave an alkaline ash in the body, are low in roughage, and may be used in the treatment of acidosis. They can also be used for catarrhal conditions.

When trying to overcome catarrhal conditions, cut the potato peeling about a half-inch thick and use it in broth or soup, cooking very little. The resulting broth will contain many important mineral elements.

Potato soup can also be used to great advantage in cases of uric acid, kidney, and stomach disorders, and for replacing minerals in the system. To make potato soup, peel six potatoes, making sure the peelings are about three-quarters of an inch thick. Place in water in a covered kettle and simmer twenty minutes. Add celery to change the flavor if desired. Add okra powder if the stomach is irritated.

The potassium in the potato is strongly alkaline, which makes for good liver activation, elastic tissues, and supple muscles. It also produces body grace and a good disposition. Potassium is the ”healer” of the body and is very necessary in rejuvenation. It is good heart element also, and potatoes can be used very well in all cases of heart troubles.

Anyone with ailments on the left side of the body-the negative side, or the heart and intestinal side of the body-can use carbohydrates that are negative in character. Potatoes are one of the best negative foods to use for building up the left side of the body.

To use an old remedy, take slices of potatoes and use as a pack over any congested part of the body. This type of pack draws out static, toxic material, or venous congestion in any part of the body. Use a narrow, thumb-shaped piece of potato to help correct hemorrhoid conditions.

To control diarrhea, cook potato soup with milk. The milk controls the diarrhea-it has a constipating effect, if boiled. The potato adds bulk, which is also necessary to control this trouble.

The raw potato juice is one of the most volatile juices and the strongest juice that can be taken into the body. It is used in many cases of intestinal disorders, as well as for rejuvenation.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (raw and pared)

Calories 279

Protein 7.6g

Fat 0.4g

Carbohydrates 6.8g

Calcium 26mg

Phosphorus 195mg

Iron 2.7g

Vitamin A trace

Thiamine 0.40mg

Riboflavin 0.15mg

Niacin 4.4 mg

Ascorbic acid 64mg

Quince

October 23, 2017

It is believed that the quince long preceded the apple, and that many ancient references to apples were, in fact, references to quince, including the forbidden fruit in the Garden of Eden. Greek mythology associates the quince with Aphrodite, the goddess of love, and many believe that the golden apple given to her by Paris was a quince.

Ancient Greeks associated the quince with fertility, and it played an important role in wedding celebrations where it was offered as a gift, used to sweeten the bride’s breath before entering the bridal chamber, and shared by bride and groom. These associations have resulted in the quince becoming known as the “fruit of love, marriage, and fertility.”

In Kydonia on the island of Crete, which is the origin of the botanical name, Cydonia oblonga, the ordinary quince of old was transformed into the fruit as we know it today in the Mediterranean area. The shape is somewhere between an apple and pear, it has a rich yellow exterior, and a strong pleasant fragrance.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

The Quince is very low in Saturated Fat, Cholesterol and Sodium. It is also a good source of Dietary Fiber and Copper, and a very good source of Vitamin C.

The quince is hard, acidic, and astringent before cooking, but once cooked and sweetened, it turns red, tastes divine, and takes on the color and flavor of love, in addition to the name.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 52

Protein: .04 g

Fat: .1 g

Carbohydrates: 14.1 g

Calcium: 10.1 mg

Phosphorus: 15.6 mg

Iron: 0.6 mg

Vitamin A: 36.8 I.U.

Thiamine: 0 mg

Riboflavin: .08 mg

Niacin: .2 mg

Lime

October 9, 2017

The lime is native to southeastern Asia and has been cultivated for thousands of years. It is believed that the Arabs brought them from India during the period of Mohammedan expansion in A.D. 570-900. From the earliest days of British sailing vessels, British sailors were given a regular ration of lime juice to prevent scurvy at sea, resulting in the nickname Limey for British sailors.

Limes have been grown in California and Florida since the early days of the citrus industry. After the great freeze in Florida in 1894-95, when the lemon industry was almost totally destroyed, California began growing virtually all the lemons in the United States. At this time Florida’s lime industry expanded, and now Florida grows most of the limes used in this country. California is second in production, and Mexico is a close third. Limes grow all year. Florida produces them from April to April, and California from October throughout the year. The main season for imports is May through August.

Limes that are green in color and heavy for their size are the most desirable commercially, because of their extreme acidity. The full, ripe, yellow lime does not have a high acid content. If the lime is kept until fully ripe it may be used in the very same way the lemon is used, and to fortify other foods with vitamin C. Like lemons, limes are very high in vitamin C, are a good source of vitamin B1, and are rich in potassium. They spoil easily, and limes with a dry, leathery skin or soft, moldy areas should be avoided. Store limes in a cool, dry place.

Limes contain 5 to 6 percent citric acid, and are too acid to drink without sweetening. Their natural flavor is enhanced when combined with other juices. Limes make a delicious dressing for fish, and, when added to melons, bring out the natural flavor of the melon. A few drops of lime juice added to consommé, or jellied soups, give a particular zest to the flavor. Sub-acid fruits, such as apples, pears, plums, peaches, grapes, and apricots, go best with limes.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Limes are good for the relief of arthritis because they have such a high vitamin C content. They are especially good for anyone with acidemia, because they are one of the most alkalinizing foods. A drink of lime juice and whey is a wonderful cooler for the brain and nervous system. Limes can be used to treat brain fever, or someone who is mentally ill. They are good for a brain with a great deal of hot blood in it, which usually shows itself in anger, hatred, or other brain disturbances. Limes make a wonderful sedative for those suffering from these afflictions.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (without rinds or seeds)

Calories: 107

Protein: 2.8g

Fat: .8g

Carbohydrates: 42.4g

Calcium: 126mg

Phosphorus: 69mg

Iron: 2.3mg

Vitamin A: 50 I.U.

Thiamine: .1mg

Riboflavin: .08mg

Niacin: .7mg

Ascorbic Acid: 94mg

Blackberry

October 2, 2017

Blackberries are native to both North America and Europe, but cultivation of this fruit is largely limited to North America. In the early days of the United States, when land was cleared for pasture, blackberry bushes began to multiply. There are many hybrids of blackberries, and both man and nature have had a hand in this process. By 1850, cultivated blackberries had become very popular. Blackberries are now cultivated in almost every part of the United States. Texas and Oregon probably have the largest numbers of acres planted with blackberries. Cultivation of this berry has been slow, because wild berries grow in abundance all over the country. The summer months are the peak season for blackberries.

A quality berry is solid and plump, appears bright and fresh, and is a full black or blue color. Do not choose berries that are partly green or off-color, because the flavor will not be good.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Blackberries are high in iron, but can cause constipation. They have been used for years to control diarrhea. If blackberry juice is mixed with cherry or prune juice, the constipating effect will be taken away. If one can take blackberry juice without constipating results, it is one of the finest builders of the blood.

Much like spinach, raisins, apples, plums and grapes, blackberries are rich in bioflavonoids and Vitamin C, but other nutritional benefits include a very low sodium count and having only 62 calories to a cup. The dark blue colour ensures blackberries have one of the highest antioxidant levels of all fruits. Antioxidants, well-known for lowering the risk of a number of cancers, are a huge bonus, but be aware the berries are best consumed in their natural state to get the full benefits.

The berries are known by a variety of names, which include brambleberries, bramble, dewberry, thimbleberry and lawers. Consumption of blackberries can help to promote the healthy tightening of tissue, which is a great non-surgical procedure to make skin look younger. Prolonged consumption also helps keeps your brain alert, thereby maintaining clarity of thought and good memory. The high tannin content of blackberries provides a number of benefits to reduce intestinal inflammation, alleviate hemorrhoids and soothe the effects of diarrhea.

Traditionally, the leaves and barks of the plant have also been consumed. The leaves of blackberries have been used to treat mild inflammation of the gums and sometimes even sore throats. The astringent tannins are effective in oral hygiene when used as a gargle or mouthwash. The leaves can also be used in a refreshing cup of tea or enhanced as a therapeutic drink. Not everyone will like the flavor, so to mask the bitter taste, honey or another form of sweetener may be added. The healthy dose of Vitamin K aids in muscle relaxing, so some women use the berries to alleviate labor pains. As part of a regular diet, the juice can also be used to regulate menstruation as it is very effective in helping blood to clot.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 294

Protein: 5.4 g

Fat: 3.6 g

Carbohydrates: 59.9 g

Calcium: 163 mg

Phosphorus: 154 mg

Iron: 4.1 mg

Vitamin A: 1,460 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.12 mg

Riboflavin: 0.03 mg

Niacin: 1.3 mg

Ascorbic acid: 106 mg

Plums and Fresh Prunes

September 25, 2017

The early colonists found plums growing wild along the entire Eastern coast. They were one of many fruits eaten by the Indians before the coming of the white man, and reports of early explorers mention the finding of plums growing in abundance. Today however native plums are not important commercially. The European type of plums, Prunas Domestica, has replaced the native plum. Plum pits from Europe probably were brought to America by the first colonists, for it is reported that plums were planted by the Pilgrims in Massachusetts, and the French brought them to Canada.

Although plums came to America by way of Europe, they are believed to have originated in Western Asia in the region south of the Caucasus Mountains to the Caspian Sea. According to the earliest writings in which the European plum is mentioned,the species dates back at least 2000 years.

Another species, Prunus Institia, known to us as the Damson plum, also came to America by way of Europe. This plum was named for Damascus and apparently antedates the European type, although Damson pits have been found in the lake dwellings of Switzerland and in other ancient ruins.

Another important species, the Japanese plum, was domesticated in Japan, but originated in China. It was introduced in the United States about 1870. This type is grown extensively in California.

Plums have been grown in some of the Spanish mission gardens of California at least as early as 1792, and the first prune plums grown in California were produced in Santa Clara Mission. However, the present California prune industry is not based on these but the French prune, Petite Prune d’Agen, scions of which were brought to California from France in 1856 by Pierre Pellier. French-type prunes grown in California orchards were shipped in to San Francisco markets in 1859.

Botanically, plums and prunes of the European or Domestica type belong to the same species. The interchangeable use of the terms “plum and prune” dates back for several centuries. Plum is Anglo-Saxon, and prune is French. It is uncertain just when the word prune was first used to designate a dried plum or a plum suitable for drying. The prune is a variety of plum that can be dried without fermenting when the pit is left in. Fresh prunes, as compared with plums, have firmer flesh, higher sugar content, and frequently higher acid content. A ripe, fresh prune can be separated from the pit like a freestone peach, but a plum cannot be opened this way.

Of all the stone fruits, plums have the largest number and greatest diversity of kinds and species. H.F. Tysser, editor of Fruit Manual, published in London, says there are over 2000 varieties. Samual Fraser, in his book America Fruits, speaks of a list of about 1500 varieties of Old World plums alone, and says there probably are just as many varieties of plums native to this continent. In addition, there is a long list of Japanese and Chinese plums.

Almost all of the plums shipped in the United States are grown in California. There are two types of California plums, Japanese and European. The former marketed early in the season and the latter in mid season or later. The Japanese varieties are characterized by their large size, heart-shape, and bright red or yellow color. Japanese varieties are never blue.

Plums and prunes of good quality are plump, clean, of fresh appearance, full colored for the particular variety, and soft enough to yield to slight pressure. Unless one is well acquainted with varieties, color alone cannot be replied upon an indication of ripeness. Some varieties are fully ripe when the color is yellowish-green, others when the color is red, and others when purplish-blue or black. Softening at the tip is a good indication of maturity. Immature fruit is hard. It may be shriveled and is generally of poor color or flavor. Over mature fruit is generally soft, easily bruised, and is often leaky.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Fresh plums are more acid to the body than fresh prunes. When too many plums are eaten, an over acid condition results. When prunes are dried, however they are wonderful for the nerves because the contain a phosphorus content of nearly 5 percent.

Prunes have a laxative effect. The dried prune is better to eat than the fresh plum or prune. The salts contained in the dried prune are valuable as food for the blood, brain and nerves. The French prunes are considered the best for their value to the nervous system.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 218

Protein: 3 g

Fat: 0.9 g

Carbohydrates: 55.6 g

Calcium: 73 mg

Phosphorus: 86 mg

Iron: 2.2 mg

Vitamin A: 1200 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.28 mg

Riboflavin: 0.18 mg

Niacin: 2.1 mg

Ascorbic acid: 20 mg

Artichoke

September 18, 2017

The artichoke is believed to be native to the area around the western and central Mediterranean. The Romans were growing artichokes over 2000 years ago, and used it as a green and a salad plant.

Artichokes were brought to England in 1548, and French settlers planted them in Louisiana in the mid-nineteenth century. California is now the center of the artichoke crop, and its peak season is March, April, and May.

The name “artichoke” is derived from the northern Italian words “articiocco” and “articoclos,” which refer to what we know to be a pine cone. The artichoke bud does resemble a pine cone.

There is a variety of vegetable called the Jerusalem artichoke, but it is not a true artichoke. It is a tuberous member of the sunflower family. Here, we refer to the two types of true artichokes, the Cardoon (cone-shaped) and the Globe. The most popular variety is the Green Globe.

The artichoke is a large, vigorous plant. It has long, coarse, spiny leaves that can grow to three feet long. The artichoke plants may grow as high as six feet tall.

A perennial, the artichoke grows best in cool, but not freezing, weather. It likes plenty of water, and rain and fog, so is best suited to the California coast, especially the San Francisco area.

For a good quality artichoke, select one that is compact, plump, and heavy, yields slightly to pressure, and has large, tightly clinging, fleshy leaf scales that are a good color. An artichoke that is brown is old or has been injured. An artichoke is over mature when it is open or spreading, the center is fuzzy or dark pink or purple, and the tips and scales are hard. March, April, and May are the months when the artichoke is abundant.

The parts of the artichoke that are eaten are the fleshy part of the leaves and heart, and the tender base. Medium-sized artichokes are best—large ones tend to be tough and tasteless. They may be served either hot or cold, and make a delicious salad.

To prepare artichokes, cut off the stem and any tough or damaged leaves. Wash the artichoke in cold running water, then place in boiling water, and cook twenty to thirty minutes, or until tender. To make the artichoke easier to eat, remove the choke in the center, pull out the top center leaves, and, with a spoon, remove the thistle-like inside.

To eat artichokes, pull off the petal leaves as you would the petals of a daisy, and bite off the end.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Artichoke hearts and leaves have a high alkaline ash. They also have a great deal of roughage, which is not good for those who have inflammation of the bowel. They are good to eat on a reducing diet.

Artichokes contain vitamins A and C, which are good for fighting off infection. They are high in calcium and iron.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (including inedible parts)

Calories: 60

Protein: 5.3 g

Fat: 0.4 g

Carbohydrates: 19.2 g

Calcium: 93 mg

Phosphorus: 160 mg

Iron: 2.4 mg

Vitamin A: 290 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.14 mg

Riboflavin: 0.09 mg

Niacin: 1.7 mg

Ascorbic acid: 22 mg

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