Foundation for Advancement in Cancer Therapy

Non-Traditional Approaches to
the Theories, Treatments and Prevention of Cancer

Rhubarb

April 22, 2019

Rhubarb is a species of plant in the family Polygonaceae. They are herbaceous perennials growing from short, thick rhizomes. They have large leaves that are somewhat triangular, with long fleshy petioles. They have small flowers grouped in large compound leafy greenish-white to rose-red inflorescence.

Most commonly, rhubarb’s leaf stalks are cooked with sugar and used in pies and other desserts. A number of varieties have been domesticated for human consumption, most of which are recognized as Rheum hybridum by the Royal Horticultural Society.

Rhubarb is usually considered to be a vegetable; however, in the United States, a New York court decided in 1947 that since it was used in the United States as a fruit, it was to be counted as a fruit for the purposes of regulations and duties. A side effect was a reduction on imported rhubarb tariffs, as tariffs were higher for vegetables than fruits.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Rhubarb can be used as a strong laxative. Its roots have been used as a laxative for at least 5,000 years.

The roots and stems are rich in anthraquinones, such as emodin and rhein. These substances are cathartic and laxative, which explains the sporadic use of rhubarb as a dieting aid. These molecules also contain sugars attached to them and are hence glycosides. Glycosides can retain water more thus adding to the cathartic action.

Rhubarb roots are used in traditional Chinese medicine; rhubarb also appears in medieval Arabic and European prescriptions.

The rhizomes (’roots’) contain stilbenoid compounds (including rhaponticin), which has shown to lower blood glucose levels in diabetic mice.

NUTRIENTS (per 100 grams)

Carbohydrates 4.54 g

Sugars 1.1 g

Dietary fibre 1.8 g

Fat 0.2 g

Protein 0.9 g

Water 93.61 g

Folate 7 μg

Vitamin C 8 mg

Vitamin E 0.27 mg

Vitamin K 29.3 μg

Calcium 86 mg

Iron 0.22 mg

Potassium 288 mg

Sodium 4 mg

Zinc 0.1 mg

Carrot

April 15, 2019

The carrot has been native to Europe since ancient times, and was introduced to the United States during the period of early colonization. Carrots soon became a staple garden crop. Today, they are one of the major truck and garden vegetables.

Depending on the variety, carrots grow to maturity and are ready for market within 70 to 120 days. They are always in season, and are produced in nearly all states. The largest carrot producers are Texas, Florida, and New York. Carrots are so easy to raise that a garden in your backyard in can yield carrots that are rich in vitamins and high in mineral content.

When purchasing carrots, look for firm, smooth, well-shaped carrots of good color and fresh appearance. The tops should be fresh and green, unless they have been damaged in transit from grower to market. Carrots with excessively thick masses of leaf stems at the point of attachment arc usually undesirable because they have large cores and may be woody. Look for carrots with “eye appeal.”

Carrots may be utilized in the diet in many ways. The best way is to eat them raw and as fresh as possible. Raw cam sticks and curls are attractive garnishes and appetizers. Grated carrot, steamed in a stainless steel kettle or baked in the oven and served with parsley and butter, is a nice dish. The bright color of carrots makes them appealing and appetizing to serve with dinner, in salads, with other vegetables, or with cottage cheese or apples and nuts.

Carrot tops are full of potassium, but because of this they are so bitter that the average person does not enjoy them. However, a small portion of the tops may be cut fine and put into mixed salads, or a bunch may be tied with string and cooked in broths or soups for flavoring and for their high mineral content. Lift them out before saving.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Because the carrot is so high in vitamin A, it has been used extensively in the diet to improve the eyesight. Carrots were used in World War II in aerial training schools to improve the eyesight of the students.

Many children have lower jaws that are underdeveloped. This deformity is usually the result of calcium deficiency in the child’s early growth. Babies do not always get enough calcium and some do not have enough raw food or other chewing foods that help promote normal growth of bones and teeth. It is good for a child to have a raw carrot with each meal. I have seen the teeth of children straighten out and the lower jaw develop in a year, when they were given a carrot to chew on before each meal.

Carrots contain a great deal of roughage. They will help in an cases of constipation.

Used as a general bodybuilder, carrot juice is excellent. This juice is presently used in cases of severe illness, and as a foundation in cancer diets. It is delicious and nutritious when combined with other juices such as parsley, celery, watercress, endive, or romaine lettuce.

Everyone can benefit from drinking fresh vegetable juice, and carrot juice one of the best. Some juice vendors believe that die short, stubby carrot is the most flavorful and colorful, and contains more vitamins and minerals. However, the long, deader carrot can be high in these values, too, and is also used.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 179

Protein: 4.8 g

Fat: 1.2 g

Carbohydrates: 37.2 g

Calcium: 156 mg

Phosphorus: 148 mg

Iron: 3.2 mg

Vitamin A: 48,000 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.27 mg

Riboflavin: 0.26 mg

Niacin: 2 mg

Ascorbic acid: 24 mg

Turnip

April 8, 2019

The turnip, which belongs to the mustard family, is reported to have come from Russia, Siberia, and the Scandinavian peninsula. It has been used since ancient times. Columella wrote in A.D. 42 that two varieties of turnips were grown in what is now known as France. Pliny refers to five varieties, and stated that the broad-bot­tom flat turnip and the globular turnip were the most popular.

Back in the sixteenth century, giant turnips created comment. In 1558, Matthiolus spoke of having heard of long purple turnips weighing thirty pounds: however, this may be considered small compared with the turnip weighing one hundred pounds grown in California in 1850.

Cartier sowed turnip seed in Canada as early as 1540, and they were cultivated in Virginia in 1609, and in Massachusetts as early as 1629. In 1707 they were plentiful around Philadelphia, and their use was recorded in South Carolina as early as 1779.

Turnips may be served steamed, with drawn butter or cream sauce. They are also excellent raw and shredded in salads.

Turnip greens are excellent cooked the same way spinach is usually cooked. The greens should be cooked in a covered pan until tender, using only the water that clings to the leaves.

Regardless of variety, turnips have much the same flavor if grown under the same conditions. They may be distinguished by shape, as round, flat, or top-shaped, and also by color of the flesh­ white or yellow-by the color of the skin, and by the leaves. Vari­eties like Seven Top and Shogoin are grown almost exclusively for the leaves.

The most popular variety is the Purple Top White Globe. This variety has a large globe-shaped root, with an irregularly marked purple cap, and its flesh is white, sweet, crisp, and tender. The leaves are dark green, large, and erect.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Turnips are very high in sulfur and are sometimes gas forming. The root vegetable can be considered a carbohydrate vegetable. If eaten raw, they have a high content of vitamin C. Turnip juice is espe­cially good for any mucous and catarrhal conditions. They have been used successfully in all bronchial disturbances, even asthma. Turnip packs over the chest are good for relieving bronchial disor­ders and packs over the throat are good for sore throats. When fresh and young, turnips can be used raw in salads. They leave an alkaline ash, and have a low calorie content and low carbohydrate content. They can be used in most diets.

Turnip leaves are considered good for controlling calcium in the body, as are all other greens. They have been used successfully in the South to combat pellagra, which is a disease caused by lack of calcium in the body.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (root vegetable)

Calories: 117

Protein: 3.9 g

Fat: .8 g

Carbohydrates: 25.7 g

Calcium: 152 mg

Phosphorus: 117 mg

Iron: 2 mg

Vitamin A: trace I.U.

Thiamine: .16 mg

Riboflavin: .26 mg

Niacin: 2.2 mg

Ascorbic Acid: 140 mg

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (turnip greens only)

Calories: 140

Protein: 11 g

Fat: .1.5 g

Carbohydrates: 20.6 g

Calcium: 987 mg

Phosphorus: 190 mg

Iron: 9.1 mg

Vitamin A: 34,470 I.U.

Thiamine: .37 mg

Riboflavin: 2.15 mg

Niacin: 2.9 mg

Ascorbic Acid: 519 mg

Beet

April 1, 2019

The beet has been cultivated for its roots and leaves since the third or fourth century B.C. It spread from the area of the Mediterranean to the Near East. In ancient times it was used only for medicinal purposes-the edible beet root we know today was unknown before the Christian era. In the fourth century beet recipes were recorded in England, and in 1810 the beet began to be cultivated for sugar in France and Germany. It is not known when the beet was first introduced to the United States, but it is known that there was one variety grown here in 1806. Sugar beets are usually yellowish-white, and are cultivated extensively in this country. The garden beet ranges from dark purplish red to a bright vermilion to white, but the most popular commercial variety is red.

Beets are available in the markets all year. Their peak season is May through October. They are primarily grown in the southern United States, the Northeast, and the vest coast states. When selecting beets, do not just look at the condition of the leaves. Beets that remain to the ground too long become tough and woody, and can be identified by a short neck, deep scars, or several circles of leaf scars around the top of the beet.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Beets are wonderful for adding needed minerals. They can be used to eliminate pocket add material in the bowel and for ailments in the gall bladder and liver. Their vitamin A content is quite high, so they are not only good for the eliminative system, but also benefit the digestive and lymphatic systems.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (without tops)

Calories: 147

Protein: 5.4 g

Fat: 0.3 g

Carbohydrates: 32.6 g

Calcium: 51 mg

Phosphorus: 92 mg

Iron: 3.4 mg

Vitamin A: 22,700 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.07 mg

Riboflavin: 0.16 mg

Niacin: 1.5 mg

Ascorbic acid: 80 mg

Spinach

March 25, 2019

Spinach is a small, fleshy-leaved annual of the goosefoot family. It is a quick-maturing, cool season crop that is hardy and will live outdoors over winter thoughout most of the area from New Jersey southward along the Atlantic Coast and in most parts of the lower South. Spinach has been both praised and abused. It has been popularized in the comic strips by the herculean feats of Popeye the sailor. On the other hand, Dr. Thurman B. Rice of the Indiana State Board of Health says, “If God had intended for us to eat spinach he would have flavored it with something.” But flavoring is a job for cooks. They way spinach is thrown in a pot with a large quantity of water and boiled for a half hour or more, it’s a wonder even Popeye relished it. Spinach should be cooked in a steamer with very little or no added water other than that clinging to the leaves after washing. If you insist on boiling it, again use only the water clinging to the leaves after washing, and cook in a covered pan for not more than ten minutes.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Spinach is an excellent source of vitamins C and A, and iron, and contains about 40 percent potassium. It leaves an alkaline ash in the body. Spinach is good for the lymphatic, urinary, and digestive systems. Spinach has a laxative effect and is wonderful in weight-loss diets. It has a high calcium content, but also contains oxalic acid. This acid combines with calcium to form a compound that the body cannot absorb. For this reason, the calcium in spinach is considered unavailable as a nutrient. This is of small importance, however, in the ordinary diet. The oxalic acid factor would become important only if a person relied largely on spinach for calcium. The only effect the acid would have is if a large quantity of spinach juice were taken. This might cause disturbing results in the joints.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 89

Protein: 10.4g

Fat: 1.4g

Carbohydrates: 14.5g

Calcium: 368mg

Phosphorus: 167mg

Iron: 13.6mg

Vitamin A: 26,450 I.U.

Thiamine: .5mg

Riboflavin: .93mg

Niacin: 2.7mg

Ascorbic Acid: 167mg

Asparagus

March 18, 2019

The ancient Phoenicians brought asparagus to the Greeks and Romans. It was described in the sixteenth century by the English writer Evelyn as “sperage,” and he said that it was “delicious eaten raw with oil and vinegar”.

When selecting asparagus, choose spears that are fresh, firm, and tender (not woody or pithy), with tips that are tightly closed. Watch for signs of decay, such as rot and mold. If the tip of the spear appears wilted, the asparagus is really too old to be good. From the tip to all but an inch of the base, the stalk should be tender. Angular stalks indicate that they are tough and stringy.

Store asparagus wrapped in a damp cloth or waxed paper, and keep refrigerated until you are ready to use it. Asparagus loses its edible quality when it is subjected to dryness and heat, which reduce the sugar content and increase the fiber content.

Asparagus is a perennial herb, and is a member of the Lily of the Valley family. It can be served hot, with drawn butter; cold, in a salad; in soups; and as a sandwich filling or flavoring.

The season for asparagus is February through July, and the peak months are April, May, and June. Early spring asparagus is from California; late spring asparagus is shipped in early April or late May from Maryland, Delaware, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, Michigan, Illinois, and Iowa. Green asparagus is the most nutritious. Some varieties are green-tipped with white butts, and some are entirely white. Most of the white variety is canned.

Asparagus is best when cooked in stainless steel, on low heat. This leaves the shoots tender and retains their original color. If cooked with the tips up, more vitamin B1 and C will be preserved. The liquid can be saved and used in vegetable cocktails.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Asparagus acts as a general stimulant to the kidneys, but can be irritating to the kidneys if taken in excess or if there is extreme kidney inflammation. Because it contains chlorophyll, it is a good blood builder.

Green asparagus tips are high in vitamin A, while the white tips have almost none. This food leaves an alkaline ash in the body. Because they have a lot of roughage, only the tips can be used in a soft diet. They are high in water content and are considered a good vegetable in an elimination diet. Many of the elements that build the liver, kidneys, skin, ligaments, and bones are found in green asparagus. Green asparagus also helps in the formation of red blood corpuscles.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 90

Protein: 7.5g

Fat: .7g

Carbohydrates: 13.1g

Calcium: 71mg

Phosphorus: 211mg

Iron: 3.11mg

Vitamin A: 3,430 I.U.

Thiamine: .54mg

Riboflavin: .59mg

Niacin: 3.9mg

Ascorbic Acid: 113mg

Strawberry

March 11, 2019

The strawberry is native to North and South America. An early Chilean variety was taken to Peru in 1557 and this same variety is still growing in Chile, Peru, Ecuador, and other South American countries. The modem strawberry was developed in Europe.

Most strawberry varieties that grow commercially today have originated within the last fifty-five years. Territories for their growth have expanded to almost every state in the Union, including the interior of Alaska.

How the name “strawberry” first came into use is often disputed. One researcher tells us that it was because straw was used between the rows to keep the berries clean and to protect the berries in the winter. Another explanation is that in Europe ripe berries were threaded on straws to be carried to market.

In 1945, about fifteen varieties constituted 94 percent of the total commercial market. The leading variety in the United States is the Blakemore, which originated in Maryland in 1923. Its firmness, earliness, and the fact that it holds its color when stored make it a leading market berry, The Klondike is grown extensively in Southern California and is one of the best shipping varieties. The Klonmore is native to Louisiana. Because it appears earlier, it is more resistant to disease and is fast replacing the Klondike in that state. Other popular varieties are the Howard 17 and the Marshall, which both originated in Massachusetts.

Strawberries are at their peak of abundance in April, May, and June; January, February, March, and July are moderate months.

Quality strawberries are fresh, clean, and bright in appearance. They have a solid red color, and the caps are attached. Strawberries without caps may have been roughly handled or are over-mature.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Strawberries are a good source of vitamin C, and contain a large amount of fruit sugar. They are an excellent spring tonic, and are delicious when juiced.

They can be considered an elimination food, and are good for the intestinal tract. Strawberries have an alkaline reaction in the body. Because of their high sodium content, they can be considered “a food of youth.” They also have a good amount of potassium.

Many people complain about getting hives from strawberries. This is usually because they are not ripened on the vine. If you are allergic to strawberries, try this: run hot water over them, then Immediately follow this by running cold water over them. This takes the fuzz off the outside of the berries, which is believed to be the cause of the hives.

The seeds of the strawberry can be irritating in cases of inflammation of the bowel or colitis.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 179

Protein: 3.5 g

Fat: 2.6 g

Carbohydrates: 35.3 g

Calcium: 122 mg

Phosphorus: 118 mg

Iron: 3.5 mg

Vitamin A: 250 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.13 mg

Riboflavin: 0.29 mg

Niacin: 1.3mg

Ascorbic acid: 261 mg

Artichoke

March 4, 2019

The artichoke is believed to be native to the area around the western and central Mediterranean. The Romans were growing artichokes over 2000 years ago, and used it as a green and a salad plant.

Artichokes were brought to England in 1548, and French settlers planted them in Louisiana in the mid-nineteenth century. California is now the center of the artichoke crop, and its peak season is March, April, and May.

The name “artichoke” is derived from the northern Italian words “articiocco” and “articoclos,” which refer to what we know to be a pine cone. The artichoke bud does resemble a pine cone.

There is a variety of vegetable called the Jerusalem artichoke, but it is not a true artichoke. It is a tuberous member of the sunflower family. Here, we refer to the two types of true artichokes, the Cardoon (cone-shaped) and the Globe. The most popular variety is the Green Globe.

The artichoke is a large, vigorous plant. It has long, coarse, spiny leaves that can grow to three feet long. The artichoke plants may grow as high as six feet tall.

A perennial, the artichoke grows best in cool, but not freezing, weather. It likes plenty of water, and rain and fog, so is best suited to the California coast, especially the San Francisco area.

For a good quality artichoke, select one that is compact, plump, and heavy, yields slightly to pressure, and has large, tightly clinging, fleshy leaf scales that are a good color. An artichoke that is brown is old or has been injured. An artichoke is over mature when it is open or spreading, the center is fuzzy or dark pink or purple, and the tips and scales are hard. March, April, and May are the months when the artichoke is abundant.

The parts of the artichoke that are eaten are the fleshy part of the leaves and heart, and the tender base. Medium-sized artichokes are best—large ones tend to be tough and tasteless. They may be served either hot or cold, and make a delicious salad.

To prepare artichokes, cut off the stem and any tough or damaged leaves. Wash the artichoke in cold running water, then place in boiling water, and cook twenty to thirty minutes, or until tender. To make the artichoke easier to eat, remove the choke in the center, pull out the top center leaves, and, with a spoon, remove the thistle-like inside.

To eat artichokes, pull off the petal leaves as you would the petals of a daisy, and bite off the end.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Artichoke hearts and leaves have a high alkaline ash. They also have a great deal of roughage, which is not good for those who have inflammation of the bowel. They are good to eat on a reducing diet.

Artichokes contain vitamins A and C, which are good for fighting off infection. They are high in calcium and iron.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (including inedible parts)

Calories: 60

Protein: 5.3 g

Fat: 0.4 g

Carbohydrates: 19.2 g

Calcium: 93 mg

Phosphorus: 160 mg

Iron: 2.4 mg

Vitamin A: 290 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.14 mg

Riboflavin: 0.09 mg

Niacin: 1.7 mg

Ascorbic acid: 22 mg

Beet

February 25, 2019

The beet has been cultivated for its roots and leaves since the third or fourth century B.C. It spread from the area of the Mediterranean to the Near East. In ancient times it was used only for medicinal purposes-the edible beet root we know today was unknown before the Christian era. In the fourth century beet recipes were recorded in England, and in 1810 the beet began to be cultivated for sugar in France and Germany. It is not known when the beet was first introduced to the United States, but it is known that there was one variety grown here in 1806. Sugar beets are usually yellowish-white, and are cultivated extensively in this country. The garden beet ranges from dark purplish-red to a bright vermillion to white, but the most popular commercial variety is red.

Beets are available in the markets all year. Their peak season is May through October. They are primarily grown in the southern United States, the Northeast, and the vest coast states. When selecting beets, do not just look at the condition of the leaves. Beets that remain to the ground too long become tough and woody, and can be identified by a short neck, deep scars, or several circles of leaf scars around the top of the beet.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Beets are wonderful for adding needed minerals. They can be used to eliminate pocket add material in the bowel and for ailments in the gall bladder and liver. Their vitamin A content is quite high, so they are not only good for the eliminative system, but also benefit the digestive and lymphatic systems.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND (without tops)

Calories: 147

Protein: 5.4 g

Fat: 0.3 g

Carbohydrates: 32.6 g

Calcium: 51 mg

Phosphorus: 92 mg

Iron: 3.4 mg

Vitamin A: 22,700 I.U.

Thiamine: 0.07 mg

Riboflavin: 0.16 mg

Niacin: 1.5 mg

Ascorbic acid: 80 mg

Radish

February 18, 2019

The radish is a member of the mustard family, but is also related to cabbage, cauliflower, kale, and turnips. After this vegetable was introduced into Middle Asia from China in prehistoric times, many forms of the plant were developed. Radishes are a cool season crop, and the peak period is April through July. The American varieties can be used for both roots and tops in salads, and cooked.

A good-quality radish is well-formed, smooth, firm, tender, and crisp, with a mild flavor. The condition of the leaves does not always indicate quality, for they may be fresh, bright, and green, while the radishes may be spongy and strong, or the leaves may be wilted and damaged in handling, while the radishes themselves may be fresh and not at all pithy. Old, slow-growing radishes are usually strong in flavor, with a woody flesh. Slight finger pressure will disclose sponginess or pithiness.

THERAPEUTIC VALUE

Radishes are strongly diuretic and stimulate the appetite and digestion. The juice of raw radishes is helpful in catarrhal conditions. The mustard oil content of the radish makes it good for expelling gallstones from the bladder.

A good cocktail can be made with radishes. This cocktail will eliminate catarrhal congestion in the body, especially in the sinuses. It will also aid in cleansing the gall bladder and liver. To make this cocktail, combine one-third cucumber juice, one-third radish juice, and one-third green pepper juice. If desired, apple juice may be added to make this more palatable. An excellent cocktail for nervous disorders is made from radish juice, prune juice, and rice polishings. This drink is high in vitamin B and aids in the flow of bile.

NUTRIENTS IN ONE POUND

Calories: 49

Protein: 2.9g

Fat: .3g

Carbohydrates: 10.3g

Calcium: 86mg

Phosphorus: 89mg

Iron: 2.9mg

Vitamin A: 30 I.U.

Thiamine: .09mg

Riboflavin: .09mg

Niacin: .9mg

Ascorbic Acid: 74mg

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